Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report 1961"

See other formats


^;;*!n,;,^:^^:^|■■:r:,',!•>^^i- 

S; Ills" 111;:;; ■ ■ 

■;t! 'CTi'ii';-'l»; ■''■■»'<'■:■■;'■■ 

















m 

























Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport1961onta 








OTTER RAPIDS GENERATING STATION - ABITIBI RIVER - With the installation of the second 
unit in October 1961, the first stage of construction at Otter Rapids Generating Station 
was complete. Two further units are scheduled for service in the second stage in 1963. 
The necessary minimum provision has been made for an ultimate installation of eight units. 




The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 



Fifty-fourth 

Annual Report 



for the year 



1961 



This Report is published pursuant to The Power Commission Act, 
Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1960, Chapter 300, Section 10. 



620 University Ave. 



Toronto, Canada 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

December 1961 



W. Ross Strike, q.c. 
Chairman 



George E. Gathercole 
1st V ice-Chairman 



William G. Davis, m.l.a. 
2nd Vice-Chairman 



Hon. Robert W. Macaulay, q.c, m.l.a. 
Commissioner 



Lt.-Col. a. a. Kennedy, d.s.o., e.d. 
Commissioner 



D. P. Cliff 
Commissioner 



Ernest B. Easson 
Secretary 



H. A. Smith 

Assistant General Manager 

Engineering 



J. M. Hambley 
General Manager 



E. H. Banks 

Assistant General Manager 
Finance 



I. K. Sitzer 

Assistant General Manager 

Production and Marketing 



C. B. C. Scott 

Assistant General Manager 

Personnel 



H. J. SiSSONS 

Assistant General Manager 
Services 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Toronto, Ontario, July 3, 1962 

The Honourable John Keiller Mackay, d.s.o., v.d., ll.d. 
Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario 

Sir: 

I have the honour to present the Annual Report of The Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission of Ontario for the year ended December 31, 1961. 

The year marks another milestone in the development of the Hydro enter- 
prise in Ontario. During 1961, extensive studies, prompted by the Ontario Munici- 
pal Electric Association, were undertaken for the amalgamation of the Southern 
Ontario System and the Northern Ontario Properties. This amalgamation is the 
final and logical step in a series of system amalgamations that have led over the 
past several decades to the physical and financial integration of an ever-widening 
network of electrical generating and transmitting facilities. In the southern part of 
the Province the Niagara, Georgian Bay, and Eastern Ontario Systems, themselves 
the result of several earlier consolidations, were merged in 1944 in the Southern 
Ontario System. In the north the combining of a number of small and some 
relatively isolated systems resulted in the Northern Ontario Properties, with 
which the former Thunder Bay System was amalgamated in 1952. The purpose 
of the present merger, like that prompting the earlier consolidations, will be the 
achievement of improved eflftciency in operation and administration. 

Nothing in the Commission's long history better demonstrates the co-opera- 
tive and responsible partnership existing among the customer municipalities than 
the successful negotiation of the present plan to merge the resources of the 



north with the substantially greater resources of the south in a province-wide 
system to be operated for the benefit of all. The amalgamation will bring about 
a simplification of power-costing procedures, and result in a more flexible financial 
system better equipped to withstand economic fluctuations. The legislation neces- 
sary to accomplish this step was enacted at the recent session of the Legislature, 
and was made effective January 1, 1962. 

The Commission also acknowledges the splendid co-operation of the munici- 
pal commissions and their staffs in the common task of supplying the people 
of the Province with electric power at cost, and recognizes too their continuing 
effort to maintain that cost at the lowest level consistent with an appropriate 
standard of service. In the face of increasing competition a combined sales 
promotion effort on the part of the Commission and the local utilities was well 
and effectively supported by electrical manufacturers, distributors, dealers, and 
contractors. This evidence of strong, co-operative effort from the electrical in- 
dustry as a whole is an encouraging promise of success in our effort to provide 
a continuously improving electrical service to our customers. 

The trend of economic activity in Canada turned upward in February 1961. 
There was no significant evidence, however, of the upturn in the Commission's 
loads until the month of June, but thereafter the climb was distinctly encouraging. 
Power demands reached a new peak in December of 5,948,800 kilowatts, which 
represents an increase of 3.5 per cent over the corresponding peak of 5,745,700 
kilowatts in 1960. Growth was, however, largely concentrated in the Southern 
Ontario System, as the Northern Ontario Properties continued to reflect little 
or no change in the power demands of the mining, and pulp and paper industries. 

The dependable peak capacity of the Commission's resources to meet this 
December demand was 6,733,800 kilowatts. The effect of additional hydro- 
electric units in the Northern Ontario Properties, and of additional thermal- 
electric units in the Southern Ontario System was offset by downward adjustment 
in the capacities of other resources, the principal factor being a reduction 
in the amount of water available to the Commission with the increased use by 
the Power Authority of the State of New York of the United States' share of 
water on the Niagara River. Despite these downward revisions the reserve 
capacities on the Commission's power networks were not materially changed 
from those of last year, and though the reserve on the combined Southern 
Ontario System and Northeastern Division is still under 12 per cent, it is con- 
sidered reasonably adequate to meet emergency conditions. 

In its continuing program for the co-ordinated development of hydro- 
electric, thermal-electric, and nuclear resources, the Commission actually in- 
stalled 500,000 kilowatts of capacity in thermal-electric stations, and added 
108,000 kilowatts of dependable peak capacity in hydro-electric stations. The 
Richard L. Hearn Generating Station in Toronto was completed, and Lakeview 
Generating Station, west of Toronto, was placed in service. Red Rock Falls Gener- 
ating Station on the Mississagi River was completed, and two units at Otter Rapids 
Generating Station on the Abitibi River were brought into service. Work 
proceeded on three new stations on the Mattagami River, and good progress was 



made on preparations for the construction of an extra-high-voltage transmission 
line associated with the continuing development of hydro-electric resources in the 
north. Thunder Bay Generating Station at the Lakehead was made ready for test- 
ing in the spring of 1962. The first source of nuclear-electric power in Canada, 
the 20,000-kw Nuclear Power Demonstration station, is scheduled for initial service 
in 1962, and construction of the Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station is in 
progress. 

Expenditure on capital construction during the year amounted to $123.7 
million, the lowest annual expenditure since 1955. Careful control of capital 
expenditure, together with various measures to conserve working capital, enabled 
the Commission to hold its borrowings during 1961 to $100 million. The re- 
sulting benefits have been obtained without loss in the efficiency or quality of 
service. Indeed, it may be unequivocally stated that recent changes in inventory 
management and control in particular have notably reduced cost and improved 
operating efficiency. 

The Commission's new research laboratory was completed in 1961, and 
the premises were occupied in September. In honour of W. P. Dobson, M.A.Sc, 
D.Sc, LL.D., who was the guiding force in the development of the Commission's 
research activities over a period of more than 40 years and a distinguished leader 
in the engineering and scientific community in Canada, the premises will be known 
as the Ontario Hydro W. P. Dobson Research Laboratory. 

The Commission wishes to record its appreciation of the effort of all members 
of the staff in making possible another year of substantial accomplishment. 

It was my pleasure, during the latter part of 1961, to welcome two new 
members to the Commission, Mr. George Edward Gathercole as First Vice- 
Chairman, and Mr. William Grenville Davis as Second Vice-Chairman. Mr. 
Gathercole succeeds the Hon. Robert W. Macaulay, who has made an outstanding 
contribution as the Government's representative on the Commission. As a result 
of increased responsibilities in the Government of the Province, Mr. Macaulay 
found it necessary to resign from the Vice-Chairmanship, but has remained a 
member of the Commission. To the other members of the Commission, who 
have been most active in carrying out their duties during 1961, I extend my 
sincere personal thanks, particularly to my predecessor, Mr. James S. Duncan, 
who gave notable leadership in public service as Chairman of Ontario Hydro 
for a period of over four and one-half years. 

Respectfully submitted, 



W. ROSS STRIKE, 

Chairman. 



CONTENTS 



Letter of Transmittal 
List of Illustrations 
List of Diagrams 



111 
viii 

X 



Section 



Foreword 

Guide to the Report - 

Operation of the Systems 

Southern Ontario System - 
Northern Ontario Properties 
Maintenance of the Systems 



Page 



9 
12 
14 
16 



II Finance --------- 

Combined Systems — 1961 ------ 

Operating Results by Systems — 1961 
Balance Sheet — Southern Ontario System 
Balance Sheet — Northern Ontario Properties 
Statement of Operations — Southern Ontario System 
Statement of Operations — Northern Ontario Properties 
Statement of Funded Debt ------ 

Statement of Advances from the Province of Ontario 



19 
21 
23 
26 

28 
30 
31 
32 
34 



III The Commission's Customers ------ 

Municipal Electrical Utilities and Local Systems 
Direct Industrial Customers and Interconnected Systems 
Rural Electrical Service ----- 

Reports from the Regions ------ 

Public Relations and Services to Customers 



36 
41 
42 

45 
51 

55 



IV Planning, Engineering, and Construction - 

Southern Ontario System 

Progress on Power Developments 
Transformer Stations - - - - 

Transmission Lines - - - . 

Northern Ontario Properties 

Progress on Power Developments - 
Transformer Stations and Transmission Lines 



58 

63 
66 
69 

71 
81 



Contents vii 

Section Page 

V Research and Testing Activities --.-.-. 34 

V'l Staff Relations --....... 95 

Appendix 

I Operations ---.----... loi 

The Commission's Power Resources ..... 102 

Resources and Loads .--.--..- 104 

Analysis of Energy Sales ....... 106 

II Financial .--...--... 109 

Southern Ontario System 

Schedules Supporting the Balance Sheet - - - 110 

Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power - - - - 118 

Sinking Fund Equity ....... 135 

Northern Ontario Properties 

Schedules Supporting the Balance Sheet - - - 144 

Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power - - - - 150 

Sinking Fund Equity ....... 154 

Amalgamated Systems Financial Statements - - - - - 155 

III Rural 152 

Description of Main Classes of Service ..... 162 

Rates and Typical Bills for Service to Rural Customers - 164 
Miles of Line and Number of Customers by Rural Operating Areas 166 

Customers, Revenue, and Consumption 1952-1961 - - - 170 

IV Legislative - - - - - -- - - - -171 

The Power Commission Amendment Act, 1961 - - - - 171 

Order in Council - - - - - - - - - 173 

Supplement 

Municipal Electrical Service ....... 175 

Financial Statements of the Municipal Electrical Utilities - - 182 

Rates and Typical Bills for Retail Service ... - 232 

Customers, Revenue, and Consumption -.-..- 256 

List of Abbreviations -.---.-..- 278 

Index • . . . - - 278 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Otter Rapids Generating Station .... Frontispiece 

Section Page 
Foreword 

Ontario Hydro W.P. Dobson Research Laboratory - - 2 
Lakeview Generating Station 

Aerial View ......... 4 

The First 300,000-kw Turbo-generator in Position - - - 5 



Operation of the Systems 

Mobile Cranes Moving a 73-foot Transmission Tower - - 17 

Radial-arm and Derrick-equipped Line Truck - - - . 17 



Finance 

Otter Rapids Generating Station — Construction by Night - - 20 

First Coal Delivery at Lakeview Generating Station - - - 24 



III The Commission's Customers 

Load Building with Electric Clothes Dryers ... 37 

Gold Medallion Home Featured in Co-operative Publicity Program 38 

Commercial Cooking Installation on Company Premises in Toronto 39 

Specialist Training for Electric-heating Sales - - - - 40 

Rotor Being Installed at Lakeview Generating Station - 43 

Automatic Electric Control of Cattle-feeding Equipment - - 48 

Application of Electricity to Hydroponics .... 49 

Phase Converter Used for Irrigation Equipment - - - - 50 

Heat-pump Installation in Large Shopping Mall in 

Metropolitan Toronto -..--.. 52 
Office Building of the Orillia Water Light and Power 

Commission -.-----.-. 52 

Pole Placement by Helicopter ...... 53 



IV Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station 

Aerial View ......... 61 

The Reactor Building ...._.. 65 

A 200-horsepower Motor to Operate a Coal Pulveriser 

at Lakeview Generating Station ------ 67 

Locating Sources of Corona on High-voltage Transmission Line 69 

Stringing Conductors on Bridge-type Towers - - - - 70 

Unit at Thunder Bay Generating Station - - - - 71 

Little Long Generating Station 

Cofferdam at the Pow^erhouse Site _ .... 72 

Adam Creek Control Dam ....... 73 

Concrete-placing for the Gravity-dam Section - - 74 

Otter Rapids Generating Station 

The Undeveloped Site ....... 78 

Progress of Construction, July 1961 ..... 79 

Assembly of a Fixed-blade Propeller for a Turbine - 80 

Generator for Unit 1 Being Assembled ... - - 80 

Collapsible Tower Facilitates Line-of-sight Survey Operations - 81 

Transmission-line Guyed V-shaped Tower . . . . . 82 



Illustrations ix 

Section Page 

V Research and Testing Activities 

Electronics and Communications Laboratory at the New 

Research Centre -------- 34 

Extra-high-voltage Line Hardware ------ 85 

Voltage-gradient Indicator ------- 86 

Model of Section of Ehv Transmission Line - - - - 87 

Structural Testing Facilities ------ 88 

Applied Mechanics Laboratory ------- 90 

Facilities for Chemicals Testing ------ 92 



VI Staff Relations 

Little Long Generating Station 

The Construction Camp ....... gc 

The Little Long Express ------ 97 

Cofferdam Construction, April 1961 - • - - 98 

Cafeteria Service . . . . . ^ . 99 



DIAGRAMS 

Section Page 

Foreword 

Total Power and Energy Production ------ 3 

I Operation of the Systems 

Power Demands and Resources 

Southern Ontario System .--.-. 12 

Northern Ontario Properties 

Northeastern Division ------- 14 

Northwestern Division ------ 15 

II Finance 

Fixed Assets, Capital, and Long-term Liabilities - - - - 22 

III The Commission's Customers 

Primary Loads — Municipal Electrical Utilities and Local Systems 41 

Primary Loads — Direct Industrial Customers - - - - 42 

Rural Service — Miles of Line and Number of Customers - 47 

Primary Loads — Rural Power District ----- 43 

I\' Planning, Engineering and Construction 

Otter Rapids Generating Station — General Plan - - - - 76 

Appendix 
111 Rural 

Sketch Map of Rural Operating Areas - - facing page 166 

Supplement 

Municipal Electrical Service 

Annual Energy Consumption and Average Cost per Kilowatt-hour 177 

Municipal Electrical Utilities 

Revenue -..---... 178 

Fixed Assets and Long-term Debt - - - - - - 179 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

The Hydro-Electric Power Commission 

of Ontario 



FOREWORD 

THE Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario is a corporate entity, 
a self-sustaining public enterprise endowed with broad powers with respect 
to electricity supply throughout the Province of Ontario. Its authority is derived 
from an Act of the Provincial Legislature passed in 1906 to give effect to recom- 
mendations of earlier advisory commissions that the water powers of Ontario should 
be conserved and developed for the benefit of the people of the Province. It now 
operates under The Power Commission Act (7-Edward VII, c. 19) passed in 1907 
as an amplification of the Act of 1906 and subsequently modified from time to 
time (Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1960, c. 300, as amended). The Commission 
may have from three to six members, all of whom are appointed by the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council. Under the Act as amended early in 1962, two Commissioners 
may be members of the Executive Council of the Province of Ontario. 

Systems and the Power Supply 

For the financial and administrative purposes of the Commission, the Province 
is divided into two parts. The roughly triangular part lying south of Lake Nipissing 
and the French and Mattawa Rivers is served by the Southern Ontario System, a 
fully integrated power system combining the Niagara, Georgian Bay, and Eastern 
Ontario Divisions. The system is operated on a co-operative basis predominantly 
for the benefit of more than three hundred municipal electrical utilities supplied 
with power at cost, but in part also, for the benefit of the Rural Power District 
which it serves. The northern part of the Province is served by the Northern 
Ontario Properties, held and operated for the most part in trust for the Province, 
but operated in part also for the benefit of a group of municipal utilities supplied 



2 Foreword 

with power at cost. The Northern Ontario Properties include a Northeastern and a 
Northwestern Division. Each of these two divisions is an integrated power system, 
the former being interconnected with the Southern Ontario System. 

In order to provide convenient, expeditious service in this dual function of 
regulation and supply, the Commission some years ago decentralized its province- 
wide operations among a number of regions. Effective January 1, 1962, there were 
eight regions with their respective administrative offices in eight major municipalities. 
The former Niagara and West Central Regions, which were progressively amalga- 
mated during 1961, are now referred to jointly as the Niagara Region. In this 
1961 report both regions are named but their statistics have been combined. After 
January 1, 1962, there were six regions in the south and two in the north; the two 
northern regions at present coincide with the two northern divisions. 

The Commission is primarily concerned with the provision of electric power 
by generation or purchase and its delivery in bulk either for resale, or for use in the 
industrial operations of certain customers served directly. Power for resale is 
delivered to the associated municipal electrical utilities, to a number of independent 
municipal distribution systems, and to certain interconnected systems operat- 
ing within or beyond the Provincial boundaries. The industrial customers served 
directly include mines and industries in unorganized areas. Some power users 
located within areas served by the municipal utilities are also served by the Commis- 
sion since their power requirements may be so large or may create supply conditions 
so unusual as to make service by the local municipal utilities impracticable. In total, 
bulk delivery for resale and for industrial use accounts for about 90 per cent of the 
Commission's energy sales. The remaining 10 per cent of the Commission's sales 
are made to ultimate customers either in rural areas served on behalf of the town- 
ships by the Commission's rural distribution facilities, or in a relatively small group 




ONTARIO HYDRO W. P. DOBSON RESEARCH LABORATORY — The new quarters housing the Com- 
mission's research and testing activities were placed in service in September 1961. They provide more 
space, and facilities much more convenient than those that were available in the former laboratory on 
Strachan Avenue, which had been continuously used for these purposes since 1912. 



I • 

4 



Power Resources ami Energy Production 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



TOTAL POWER RESOURCES AND ENERGY PRODUCTION 



MILLION KILOWATTS 



DECEMBER DEPENDABLE PEAK CAPACITY 



of power purchased 



of Commission generating stations 



T 

1940 



T 

1945 



1950 



T 

1955 



BILLION KILOWATT-HOURS 



ANNUAL ENERGY PRODUCTION 



Purchased 



Generated 



1940 



T 

1945 



T 

1950 



1955 



Foreword 




LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION — Situated on a 145-acre site on the shore of Lake Ontario just 
west of Toronto, the station will be one of the largest thermal-electric stations in the world. The stack 
for the first two 300,000-kw units of the six proposed for installation rises 490 feet, a full 300 feet 
above the powerhouse building. The dock for the delivery of coal extends 2,000 feet from shore and 
is capable of handling two coal carriers at a time. Total coal-storage capacity will be approximately 

2.5 million tons. 



of municipalities served by Commission-owned local distribution systems. In 
general, however, retail service to ultimate customers in most cities and towns, in 
many villages, and in certain populous township areas is supplied by the associated 
electrical utilities, owned and operated by local commissions and functioning under 
the general supervision of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario as 
provided for in The Power Commission Act and The Public Utilities Act. 



Financial Features 

The basic principle governing financial operations of the undertaking and 
its associated municipal electrical utilities is that service is provided at cost. In the 
Commission's operations, cost of service includes payment for power purchased, 
charges for operating and maintaining the power systems, and related fixed charges. 
The fixed charges represent interest on debt, reserve provisions for depreciation 
and for contingencies and rate stabilization, and the further provision of a sinking 
fund reserve for retiring the Commission's long-term debt. The municipal utilities 
operating under cost contracts with the Commission are billed throughout the year 
at interim rates based on estimates of the cost of service. At the end of the year, 
when the actual cost of service is established, the necessary balancing (debit or 
credit) adjustments are made in their accounts. Retail rates for the municipal 
utilities are established at levels calculated to produce adequate revenue to meet 



Financial Features 5 

cost. The Commission's retail rate structure for rural service other than industrial 
power service has been uniform throughout the Province since 1944. 

The enterprise from its inception has been self-sustaining. The Province, 
however, guarantees the payment of principal and interest on all bonds issued by 
the Commission and held by the public. In addition, the Province has materially 
assisted the development of agriculture by contributing under The Rural Hydro- 
Electric Distribution Act toward the capital cost of extending rural distribution 
facilities. 

Annual Summary — 1961 

During 1961 the Commission brought into service the last of four 200,000- 
kilowatt units to complete the eight-unit Richard L. Hearn Generating Station, 
one 300,000-kilowatt unit at Lakeview Generating Station, the second of two units 
at Red Rock Falls Generating Station on the Mississagi River having a combined 
dependable peak capacity of 40,000 kilowatts, and two units at Otter Rapids 
Generating Station on the Abitibi River, having a combined dependable capacity 
of 88,000 kilowatts. 

In addition to the work involved in bringing these units into service during 
1961, the Commission was engaged in constructing three other hydro-electric sta- 
tions and completing a third conventional thermal-electric station. These are Little 




LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION — The first 300,000-kw turbo-generator is shown in position at 

the station. It underwent its first test in service beginning on October 31, 1961. Like the second unit, 

which is scheduled for service in 1962, this is a cross-compound impulse reaction machine with one 

stage of reheat. Each line drives a 150,000-kw, 1 6,000-volt generator at 0.85 power factor. 



6 Foreword 

Long, Harmon, and Kipling Generating Stations on the Mattagami River, and 
Thunder Bay Generating Station in Fort William. Two nuclear-electric stations 
are also included in the current program of construction, the- 20,000-kilowatt 
Nuclear Power Demonstration plant now nearing completion on the Ottawa River 
near Rolphton, Ontario, and the 200,000-kilowatt Douglas Point Nuclear Power 
Station being built on the shore of Lake Huron between Kincardine and Port Elgin. 

The Commission's net revenue from the sale of primary power and energy rose 
by 2.8 per cent from $229.2 million in 1960 to $235.7 million in 196L Revenue 
from the sale of secondary energy, amounting to $4.5 million in 1961, was applied 
as in the past three years as an offset against the cost of power. 

During the year under review good progress was made in planning for the 
proposed merging of the Southern Ontario System and the Northern Ontario 
Properties as the last in a series of amalgamations that have taken place in the 
Province over a period of several decades, all with the objective of achieving im- 
proved efficiency in operation and administration. These amalgamations have 
progressively led to the physical and financial integration of an ever-widening 
network of electrical generating and transmitting facilities. In the southern part of 
the Province the Niagara, Georgian Bay, and Eastern Ontario Systems, themselves 
the result of several earlier consolidations, were merged in 1944 in the Southern 
Ontario System. In the north, the combining of a number of small, and some 
relatively isolated systems resulted in a system known as the Northern Ontario 
Properties. Since 1952 the former Thunder Bay System has also been a part of this 
consolidation. Following the enactment of the required legislation in 1962, the 
amalgamation of the southern and northern systems became effective January 1, 
1962. A balance sheet and certain supporting statements for the Amalgamated 
Systems as at January 1, 1962 are included in Appendix II of this Report. 



Statistical 



1952 



Dependable peak capacity, December thousand kw 3,353 

Primary power requirements, December thousand kw 3,278 

Annual energy generated and purchased million kwh 1 9,974 

Primary million kwh 18,774 

Secondary million kwh 1,200 

Annual energy sold by the Commission million kwh 17,728 

Annual revenue of the Commission (net after refunds) million $ 112 

Fixed assets at cost million $ 1,177 

Gross expenditure on fixed assets in year million $ 163 

Total assets, less accumulated depreciation milHon $ 1,266 

Long-term debt million $ 862 

Transmission line circuit miles 14,813 

Primary rural distribution .line circuit miles 40,277 

Average number of employees in year 19,570 

Number of associated municipal electrical utih'ties 329 

Ultimate customers served by the Commission and municipal utilities thousands 1,316 



Guide to the Report 



GUIDE TO THE REPORT 

Details of the Commission's activities which have been briefly summarized 
in the foregoing paragraphs are given in the six sections and four appendices of 
the Report which follow. Operations, finance, and customer relations are the 
subjects of the first three sections and their related appendices. The narrative in 
Section 1 dealing with the production, purchase, and delivery of power is supple- 
mented in the text by reports of weather conditions, maintenance, communications, 
and forestry, all of which are related to operations. Supplementary tables are in 
Appendix I. Section II includes the Commission's balance sheets, statements of 
financial operations, and tables showing the funded debt and advances from the 
Province of Ontario. Appendix II includes supporting schedules and accounts, 
in addiiicn to the statements of reserves, sinking fund equity, and cost of power. 
In Section III, consideration is given first to the wholesale operation of supplying 
power to municipal electrical utilities and to certain interconnected systems for 
resale, and second to service to certain industrial customers supplied directly by the 
Commission. The supply of power in wholesale quantities to the rural operating 
areas is then briefly discussed under the heading Rural Electrical Service. This 
commentary is immediately followed by a discussion of retail aspects of service to 
ultimate customers served by the Commission in these areas. Supplementary 
information on rural service is to be found in Appendix III. Another subsection 
of Section III, in the form of reports from the regions, deals with certain activities 
relative to service in municipal utilities. Many of these activities have involved 
participation by, or the assistance of, members of the Commission's staff. 

Engineering and construction activities are discussed in the two sections 
that follow. Section IV deals with the planning and construction of facilities for 
the delivery of power. It includes descriptions of the more important construction 



Summary 1952-1961 



1953 


1954 


1955 


1955 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1950 


1961 


3,565 


4,135 


4,530 


4,552 


4,844 


5,761 


6,155 


6,526 


6,734 


3,488 


3,702 


4,229 


4,514 


4,784 


5,139 


5,556 


5,746 


5,949 


20,912 


22,386 


26,555 


29,523 


31,101 


31,450 


35,465 


37,709 


38,212 


19,951 


20,788 


23,258 


25,537 


27,405 


28,382 


31,546 


32,717 


33,861 


961 


1,598 


3,297 


3,986 


3,696 


3,058 


3,919 


4,992 


4,351 


18,574* 


19,909* 


23,888* 


26,802* 


28,288* 


28,599* 


32,058 


34,317 


34,807 


136 


143 


162 


183 


197 


198 


213 


229 


236 


1,355 


1,469 


1,573 


1,733 


1,931 


2,108 


2,248 


2.361 


2,462 


184 


133 


115 


173 


209 


191 


154 


132 


124 


1,491 


1,653 


1,788 


2,011 


2,255 


2,421 


2.548 


2,660 


2,780 


1,040 


1,162 


1,209 


1,392 


1,573 


1,692 


1,786 


1,844 


1,918 


15,251 


15,785 


16,115 


16,489 


16,717 


17,499 


17,713 


17,831 


17,971 


41,589 


42,540 


43,851 


44,492 


45,375 


46,438 


47,351 


47,896 


48,068 


19,242 


18,750 


17,278 


18,075 


19,597 


17,701 


15,866 


15,179 


15,097 


332 


338 


343 


350 


351 


354 


354 


354 


354 


1,390 


1,467 


1,540 


1,612 


1,674 


1,757 


1,830 


1,881 


1,939 



*Revised 



8 Foreword 

projects and statistics relative to these and other facilities for the generation, 
transformation, and delivery of power. Section V contains reports on the progress 
of some of the investigations being conducted by members of the Commission's 
Research Division. 

Section VI deals with aspects of employee relations, training, and staff 
administration. Appendix IV lists Orders in Council, and records legislation 
pertaining to the Commission's affairs. 

A large part of the Report is devoted to aspects of retail service to ultimate 
customers, especially that provided by the municipal electrical utilities. The 
commentary on these activities and the statistical tables applicable to them are 
brought together in a supplement to the Report entitled Municipal Electrical 
Service beginning on page 175. The complete municipal service supplement 
includes four statements: (1) Statement "A" — balance sheets, (2) Statement 
"B" — operating statements, (3) Statement "C" — rates, and (4) Statement "D" 
— other statistical information relating to the municipal systems. As the service 
rendered by the Commission-owned local systems is comparable to that provided 
by the municipal utilities, the local systems are included in the statistical summaries 
in the municipal supplement and are also listed in Statements "C" and "D". 



SECTION I 



OPERATION OF THE SYSTEMS 



THE economic trend in Canada which had been downward through most of 
1960, turned upward early in 1961. There was, however, no significant evi- 
dence of growth in the Commission's loads until late in the first half of 1961. An 
encouraging upward trend that developed in the third quarter of the year levelled 
off to some extent in December with the prevailing mild weather. The result was 
that primary peak requirements in 1961 exceeded those of the previous year by 
only 3.5 per cent. This was very little greater than the corresponding increase in 

I 1960 of 3.4 per cent. 

The dependable peak capacity of the Commission's resources generated and 
purchased in 1961 was 3.2 per cent greater than the peak capacity of resources 
in 1960. The increase includes two new units at Richard L. Hearn Generating 

II Station in Toronto, one of which was in service in 1960 but not available at the 
time of the 1960 peak, two units at Otter Rapids Generating Station on the Abitibi 

! River, and the second of two units at Red Rock Falls Generating Station on the 
I Mississagi River. The effect of these additions was offset to a considerable extent 
by a downward revision in the dependable capacity of the Niagara River gener- 
ating stations following a reduction in the amount of water available to Ontario 
I Hydro now that the Power Authority of the State of New York is able to make 
use of water to which the United States is entitled by international agreement. A 
. further reduction in dependable capacity reflects a temporary limitation in trans- 
j mission capability affecting delivery from resources on the Abitibi River since 
i deliveries to the system from the 60-cycle unit at Abitibi Canyon Generating 
I Station and from Otter Rapids Generating Station cannot be fully realized until 
ij October 1963 when the 460-kv transmission line from Abitibi Canyon Generating 
Station to Sudbury is scheduled to go in service initially at 230 kv. No new 



10 



Operation of the Systems 

POWER SUPPLY STATISTICS— 1961 

(Figures for 1960 and Per Cent Change in Italic Type) 







Southern 
Ontario 
System 


Northern Ontario 
Properties 






North- 
eastern 
Division 


North- 
western 
Division 


Total 


Resources 












Dependable peak capacity 
— December kw 
kw 


5,716,750 

5,558,750 
2.8%c 


420,500 

371,500 

13.2% 


596,500 

595,900 

0.1% 


6,733,750 
6,526,150 

3.27c 


Requirements 












Primary 

Peak — Annual maximum 


kw 
kw 


4,982,455 
4,772,583 

4.4%c 


553,439 

551,661 

0.3%c 


425,270 
433,274 
—1.87c 


5,948,817* 
5,745,682* 

3.57c 


Energy — Total annual 


kwh 
kwh 


27,610,376,454 

26,321,825,289 

4.9 %o 


3,561,305,871 
3,636,699,913 

-2.17c 


2,690,057,520 
2,759,000,194 

-2.57c 


33,861,739,845 
32,717,525,396 

3.57c 


Loads 












Primary and Secondary 
Peak — Annual maximum 


kw 
kw 


5,344,455 
5,031,545 

6.2%o 


571,029 

552,053 

3.47c 


584,412 

574,328 

1.8% 


6,463,932* 
6,157,534* 
5.07c 


Energy — Total annual 


kwh 

kwh 


31,021,060,331 

30,547,653,589 

1.57c 


3,697,971,076 

3,768,375,431 

—l'97c 


3,493,221,800 

3,392,853,908 

3.0% 


38,212,253,207 

37,708,882,928 

1.37c 


Primary Only 

Energy — For use in Ontario 
kwh 
kwh 


27,318,298,254 
25,924,170,889 

5.4% 


3,561,305,871 
3,636,699,913 

—2.17c 


2,689,678,320 
2,759,000,194 

—2.57c 


33,569,282,445 

32,319,870,996 

3.9% 


— Total annual 


kwh 
kwh 


27,610,376,454 

26,321,728,089 

4.9%o 


3,561,305,871 

3,636,699,913 

-2.17c 


2,689,678,320 
2,759,000,194 

-2.57c 


33,861,360,645 
32,717,428,196 

3.5% 



These annual maxima are the arithmetic sums of the three non-coincident system peaks in 
December. In the two northern divisions the annual maximum does not necessarily occur in 
December. 



generating resources were placed in service in the Northwestern Division during 
1961, but reserves of power in this Division still are above normal. 

During 1961, the Commission's generating stations produced a total of 31.1 
billion kilowatt-hours, which was 1.9 per cent below the total generated in 1960. 
The contribution to this total by hydro-electric stations was 30.6 billion kilowatt- 
hours, down 3 per cent from a year ago. On the other hand, thermal-electric 



I 



Stream -flow and Storage Conditions 11 

production at 0.5 billion kilowatt-hours was more than three times the 1960 
production. Purchased power reached a total of 7.1 billion kilowatt-hours for an 
increase of 18.6 per cent over the amount purchased in 1960. The total output 
generated and purchased rose by 1.3 per cent during the year to a level of 38.2 
billion kilowatt-hours. Comparative figures for both years will be found in the 
table on page 104. 

Stream-flow and Storage Conditions 

During the early months of the year run-off generally declined in the Southern 
Ontario System, but stream-flows were maintained by increasing the rate of with- 
drawal from the storage reservoirs. Following the conclusion of freshet flows 
towards the end of May, the trend in run-off continued downward through the 
month of June, but thereafter generally returned to normal. 

Water-storage conditions were generally satisfactory except in the Ottawa 
River watershed where storage had fallen 15 per cent below normal by mid- July 
and remained at that level until mid-September. Subsequently, above-normal rain- 
fall in the area of the upper Ottawa River resulted in substantially increased run-off 
which brought storage conditions back to near normal for the balance of the year. 
Compared with the record of the past ten years, the mean flows of the Niagara, 
St. Lawrence, and Ottawa Rivers were below their respective ten-year means. 

In the Northeastern Division stream-flow and water-storage conditions sim- 
ilar to those in the Southern Ontario System prevailed except that storage was well 
above normal in the last quarter, a result of generally good flows, and flows of 
freshet proportion on the Abitibi River during September and October in par- 
ticular. Freshet flows in the western sector of the Northwestern Division were 
somewhat below normal because of the lack of snow cover and spring rains. During 
the remainder of the year lack of rainfall resulted in below-normal flows in the 
western sector, where run-off into Lac Seul and Lake St. Joseph during the summer 
and autumn approached the minimum previously recorded. Water storage in this 
sector v/as well below normal throughout the year. In the eastern sector heavy 
rainfall early in September resulted in increased run-off and reservoir storage 
slightly above normal for the remainder of the year. 

Licences for the Export of Power 

During 1961 the Commission applied under the National Energy Board Act 
for four licences covering the export of power in the years 1962 to 1965 inclusive. 
The licences were granted by Order of the Governor General in Council upon 
the recommendation of the National Energy Board but some reductions in the 
amounts of interruptible energy that may be exported were imposed, and the 
termination dates of three of the licences were revised from December 31, 1965 
to March 31, 1965. 

An amendment to the Excise Tax Act, effective August 31, 1961, is a benefit 
to the Commission in that excise tax will now be paid on the net transfer of 
energy and not as heretofore on the gross amount of energy exported by the 
Commission. 



12 



Operation of the Systems 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

Primary peak requirements in the Southern Ontario System reflected improv- 
ing economic conditions as the growth trend returned to approximately the long- 
term rate between August and November. The rate of growth slackened, however, 
in December with the unseasonably mild weather, and the peak demand of 
4,982,455 kilowatts registered on December 18 was only 4.4 per cent above the 
previous December peak. 

Production from hydro-electric resources was down 5.3 per cent from the 
previous year, owing in part to below-normal flows in the eastern part of the 
system, and in part to the reduction in the amount of Niagara River water available 
for use in Canada. Production from thermal-electric stations, by contrast, was 
slightly more than three times the 1960 production. The production of energy for 
secondary load purposes during 1961 was 19.3 per cent below production in 1960, 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

POWER DEMANDS AND RESOURCES 
SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 



MILLION KILOWATTS 
6 



DECEMBER DEPENDABLE PEAK CAPACITY 

of power purchased 

of Commission generating stations 

DECEMBER PRIMARY PEAK REQUIREMENTS 




1940 



T 

1945 



/ 



y 



1950 



1955 



1960 



Operations — Southern Ontario System 13 

and sales of surplus power to the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation were 
particularly affected. Since the Corporation can now conveniently obtain power 
from the Power Authority of the State of New York, it no longer ranks as the 
major oudet for the Commission's secondary production. The Detroit Edison 
Company thus became the Commission's principal customer for surplus energy. 

Since 1958 when the combined international power development on the St. 
Lawrence River was placed in service, increasing latitude has been gradually 
permitted to the power entities in the use of water for peaking purposes on a test 
basis. In the early stages, beginning in November 1959, variations of from 10,000 
cfs above or below stipulated weekly average flow were permitted. The latitude 
was increased in December 1959 to 20,000 cfs, and in January 1961 again in- 
creased to 30,000 cfs above or below weekly average flow. Also beginning in January 
1961 and continuing through the non-navigation season, flows in excess of the 
stipulated weekly average were permitted from Monday to Friday, and the 
equivalent of this excess flow was ponded over week-ends. An Operations Advisory 
Committee, established by the power entities and including representatives of five 
of the groups most affected by these arrangements, makes recommendations regard- 
ing any desirable limitations on peaking and ponding. A new Regulation Plan 
1958C, formally adopted on January 6, 1962, further provides in the method for 
the storage of water in Lake Ontario during the spring and early summer and for 
its release later in the year. A temporary arrangement of a similar kind which was 
in effect during the summer and fall of 1961 was beneficial, as the present arrange- 
ment is, both to navigation and to power production. The continuance of peaking 
and ponding, and revisions in the Regulation Plan are at the discretion of the St. 
Lawrence International Board of Control, and the International Joint Commission. 
Recommendations regarding the Regulation Plan are made by an operating advisory 
group established by the Board of Control, and similar in constitution to the Com- 
mittee already mentioned. 

A Memorandum of Understanding covering operation and maintenance of 
the joint works at the St. Lawrence River Power Development was signed on 
October 17, 1961 by the Commission and the Power Authority of the State of 
New York. The Memorandum defines joint works, for which all costs of operation 
and maintenance will be equally shared, and wholly owned works, which are the 
exclusive responsibility of the respective power entities. In addition to outlining 
detailed rules and procedures, it establishes a Joint Works Committee to administer 
the Memorandum. 

Unit Tripping of Power Sources 

In order to permit the desired transfer of power under normal conditions, and 
yet limit line loadings to safe values in the event of the loss of transmission 
capability, automatic unit tripping was first introduced into the Southern Ontario 
System in the autumn of 1959. Automatic unit tripping is the reduction of 
generation simultaneously with the automatic removal of faulted transmission 
lines from service. Its use has since been extended, until in September 1961 it 
was being applied on all 230-kv circuits entering Cherrywood Switching Station 
from the east. For example, the operation of protective relays on a circuit will 



14 



Operation of the Systems 



send a signal by power-line carrier to trip off units at Robert H. Saunders-St. 
Lawrence Generating Station and thereby reduce output by an amount approxi- 
mately equivalent to the load of the faulted circuit. This permits the loads on the 
operating lines to remain relatively unchanged and within the stability limits. A 
similar result is achieved at certain stations of the Commission's Quebec suppHers 
through special bus and tripping arrangements. Service to customers is not af- 
fected by unit tripping since the temporary reduction of output is compensated 
for by increased output from other generating stations and by power flow from 
interconnected systems. 

NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES 

Requirements of primary power in the Northeastern Division registered a 
seasonal decHne from the January peak of 553,439 kilowatts, and during the 
succeeding four months peak demands were below the corresponding months of 
the previous year. From then until the month of November there was some 
evidence of improvement over loads in the previous year, but the peak in the 
month of December again fell below the corresponding 1960 level. The peak 
established in January 1961 exceeded the 1960 peak by only 0.3 per cent. 







THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

POWER DEMANDS AND RESOURCES 
NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES- NORTHEASTERN DIVISION 

KILOWATTS 


DEC 

i 


EMBER DEPENDABLE PEAK CAPACITY 

of power purchased 

of Commission generating stations 

i 


/ i;nn nnn 






— 400.000 

— 300,000 

— 200.000 

— lOO.COO 


— • — DECEMBER PRIMARY PEAK REQUIREMENTS 




" 


" 








.^' 


- 


J-L 


- 


J-L 


— 


-' 


>^- 


- - 


:^' 


,v' 


<• 


r' 


,y 




- 


- - 


- 


- - 


- - 


^ 


.^ 


1 1 1 1 1 ' 

1940 1945 1950 1955 I960 



Operations — ISorthern Ontario Properties 



15 



With two units at Otter Rapids Generating Station available in the latter part 
of the year, and the second unit at Red Rock Falls Generating Station available 
for the greater part of the year, there was a 17.3 per cent increase in hydro- 
electric production in 1961, which was largely responsible for a reduction of 35.4 
per cent in the net amount of assistance required from the Southern Ontario system. 

Among other purchases of energy substantial quantities of surplus energy were 
purchased during the year from the Great Lakes Power Corporation Limited. At 
the Corporation's request its system was operated on occasion in parallel with the 
Commission's system in order to stabilize voltage during the rolling of heavy steel 
beams at the plant of a large steel company. 

Shortly after the Municipality of South River became a cost-contract cus- 
tomer of the Commission in March, the facilities of the South River Power 
Company were operated in parallel with the Northeastern Division network. The 
Commission agreed to purchase the output of the Power Company's plant. 

The Commission's Kagawong Generating Station was closed down in July 1961 
when essential repairs to operating equipment proved to be uneconomical. 

Primary power requirements in the Northwestern Division fell below those of 
the corresponding months in 1960 for all but the months of November and 







THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

POWER DEMANDS AND RESOURCES 
NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES- NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

KILOWATTS 




of power purchased 

of Commission generating stations 




J—. 


- - 


500.000 

- — 400,000 

- — 300.000 

- — 200,000 

- — 100.000 


y 


r- 


— . — *PRIMARY PEAK REQUIREMENTS 


z 


7 


/ 




rn 


,^' 


'^ 


■/ 


/ 


- - 


• 


■f 


-V 














,== 


fn 


y 


7' 


--* 














1 1 1 1 1 

1940 1945 1950 1955 196 

*Maximum peak recorded between September and December each year. 




\ 



16 Operation of the Systems 

December, when there were slight increases. The maximum requirement for the 
year was the November peak of 425,270 kilowatts, but even this was 1.8 per cent 
below the maximum peak of 1960. 

Since the system of the Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board, like the western area 
of the Commission's Northwestern Division, was affected by poor stream-flows, 
the Commission was able to dispose of considerably more surplus energy in 
Manitoba than in the previous year. The credit for power produced in Manitoba 
from water diverted from Lake St. Joseph was also much higher than in 1960. 
Arrangements were completed to supply the Marathon Corporation of Canada 
Limited with turbo-replacement power commencing in March 1961. These were 
the principal factors contributing to a 26.8 per cent increase in the production 
of surplus hydro-electric energy. 

Repairs to the intake structure, headgate hoist, and cyhndrical headgate at 
Aguasabon Generating Station were completed. The equipment, damaged in the 
unusual occurrence of December 1, 1960 as described in the 1960 Report, was 
restored to normal operation by the beginning of December. Since each unit had 
its own penstock valve, it was possible to operate the generating units throughout 
the period when repairs were being made. In order to prevent recurrence of the 
type of damage experienced, a head differential sensing control system has been 
installed at Aguasabon Generating Station, and also at Silver Falls Generating 
Station where there was a potential hazard of the same kind. 

MAINTENANCE OF THE SYSTEMS 

Electrical Maintenance 

With a view to maintaining a maximum degree of service security combined 
with economy in operation, mobile substations were used more extensively during 
1961 not only to meet emergency situations but also to permit planned main- 
tenance without interruption of loads. Procedures are also being improved for the 
rehabilitation of transformers in place, so that equipment outage time can be 
economically reduced. 

No major failures were encountered in stator windings of large rotating ma- 
chines, but extensive repairs were required to the stator core of a large frequency- 
changer as a result of heavy circulating currents arising from a failure of insulation 
on a stacking bolt. Extensive and relatively costly repairs were also required on six 
rotating units at Sir Adam Beck-Niagara Pumping-Generating Station when failure 
at the brazed joints in the amortisseur windings resulted in damage to the rotor iron. 

While there was no major damage during the year to 230-kv or 115-kv 
switchgear, one 26-kv breaker was damaged beyond economical repair during 
an electrical storm. 

Mechanical Maintenance 

Welding was carried out on several turbines at the Sir Adam Beck-Niagara 
Generating Station No. 2 and the Pumping-Generating Station. On some turbines, 
parts particularly vulnerable to pitting were overlaid with stainless steel with a view 
to reducing outages in the future. 



Maintenance of the Systems 



17 



The turbine runner from Silver Falls Generating Station was shipped to the 
manufacturer for major repairs, and was subsequently returned to service. 

Line Maintenance 

With the trend towards greater mechanization for the purpose of achieving 
improved efficiency in maintenance operations, the Commission expanded its truck 
fleet by 1 7 radial-arm, derrick-equipped, line trucks, bringing the total so equipped 
to 23. Many of these trucks also have auxiliary equipment such as earth augers, 
pole pullers, and power-operated tampers. 

Mobile cranes were used to relocate a number of high-voltage transmission- 
line towers. The necessity for dismanding the towers was thus eliminated. The 
moves were required to accommodate road widening and improvement. 

Maintenance on underground cables included repair work on the 1 1 5-kv 
cable from Toronto-Leaside Transformer Station to Toronto-Glengrove Trans- 
former Station, which was out of service for approximately a week when a fence 
post was driven through the cable aluminum sheath. Two months' work was 
required on the 230-kv cable from Lakeview Generating Station to A. W. Manby 




LINE OPERATIONS — Left: By the use of two mobile cranes, this 73-foot tower was moved a distance 
of 40 feet and re-established on a new 10-foot extension without removing the 230-kv conductors. 
The actual relocation, which was required by road-widening work, took only half an hour. The 
necessary interruption in service on this 230-kv line for several hours for the preparation and comple- 
tion of the reconnection would have been much longer under conventional methods. 

Right: A regional operations crew is shown using a versatile radial-arm derrick and 
digger for relocating power lines. The machine bores the new post hole, removes the pole by means of 
on hydraulic butt puller, moves and resets the pole in its new position up to 12 feet away. Recently, 
90 poles on 3 miles of live 8,000-volt line were thus moved without service interruption. 



18 Operation of the Systems 

Transformer Station, which had been cut by a power shovel engaged in pipeline 
installation. 

In addition to their regular line patrol and brush-spraying operations, the 
Commission's helicopters were used for approximately 500 hours of survey work 
as well as for pole placement and other line construction operations. Experimental 
stringing of ground cable on a 115-kv, wood-pole transmission line was success- 
fully carried out by helicopter. A helicopter of a somewhat larger model than those 
previously used was purchased by the Commission for line construction work. 

During the year the helicopter fleet patrolled over 109,000 miles of trans- 
mission lines and sprayed approximately 5,100 acres of high- voltage transmission- 
line right of way. 

More than 10,500 transmission, distribution, and communication poles were 
replaced because they were considered insufficiently strong to ensure reliable 
service. Nearly 200 steel towers on older transmission lines were cleaned and 
painted as part of the progressive maintenance program. 

Forestry 

The problem of dealing with Dutch elm disease, which has already killed 
thousands of trees in Ontario, has become acute. Special tree removal crews have 
been established in the Central and Western Regions for the purpose of removing 
from the Commission's power and communication circuits the hazards due to this 
infestation. Since trees killed by the disease deteriorate rapidly in strength, special 
equipment is being used to eliminate the hazard of climbing them. 

Spraying operations for the control of woody growth on rights of v/ay con- 
tinued at approximately the same level as in the past three years — a total of 
45,500 acres being treated including the 5,100 sprayed from the air. Tree pruning 
and removal were carried out as required on 13,100 miles of transmission and 
distribution line as well as on about 1,100 miles of newly constructed or munici- 
pally owned lines. 

In the continuing reforestation program more than 125,000 seedling trees 
were planted on approximately 150 acres of Commission property in the Eastern, 
Northeastern, and Northwestern Regions. 



SECTION II 



FINANCE 



THE general administrative bases upon which service was provided in 1961 
to the Southern Ontario System and the Northern Ontario Properties are 
outlined on page 1 of the Foreword to this Report. The balance sheets and oper- 
ating statements for the two systems are included in this section together with a 
statement of funded debt and a schedule of Provincial advances outstanding. 
Supporting schedules are to be found in Appendix II beginning, for the Southern 
Ontario System on page 110, and for the Northern Ontario Properties on page 144. 
The two statements of the allocation of the cost of primary power in Appendix II 
itemize for each cost-contract municipality its share of the total costs incurred and 
the amount billed under its interim rate. The financial operating results for the 
municipal electrical utilities are reported in the municipal service supplement 
included at the end of the Report. 

With the passage early in 1962 of "An Act to effect the Consolidation of All 
Works and Systems of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario", the 
financial basis upon which service is provided has changed. Effective January 1, 
1962, the former Southern Ontario System and the Northern Ontario Properties 
were amalgamated financially, and will be known henceforth as the Amalgamated 
Systems. Appendix II of this Report beginning on page 109, in addition to the usual 
supporting schedules and statements applicable to financial operations in 1961, 
presents the balance sheet and certain supporting schedules for the Amalgamated 
Systems as at the effective date of merger on January 1, 1962. 

Rate Review 

During 1961 the Commission was generally successful in its continuing efforts 
to stabilize power rates against inflationary pressures. These efforts and the effect 
of matured sinking fund made it possible to reduce the 1961 interim rates for 
approximately half the cost municipalities while the majority of others experienced 
no change. Rates to a number of industrial customers served directly by the Com- 
mission were increased as their contracts came up for review. Within the Rural 

19 



20 



Finance 



Power District the previous farm service rate schedules were replaced with a new 
standard structure designed to promote the sale of electricity. An adjustment in the 
rural street-lighting rates which was necessary at the end of 1961 resulted in both 
decreases and increases but in little net change in revenues. 

A review of the adequacy of existing interim rates in meeting the anticipated 
1962 costs indicated that no change appeared to be necessary for the majority of 
cost-contract municipalities and that the minor increases and decreases for the few 
remaining municipal utilities were approximately equivalent, the most significant 
increases being to cost municipalities in the former Thunder Bay System. 

Electronic Data Processing 

The applications of electronic data processing have been further increased 
during the past year, affording particular evidence of the worth of novel approaches 
both in the solution of mathematical problems and in computer programming. 
The amount of computer time spent on engineering and scientific problems has 
increased at a rate slightly in excess of what might normally have been expected. 
In conjunction with a study being carried on in operations research, progress is 
being made towards the development of a scheme for system-wide automatic control 
for the optimum scheduling of generating resources. 

During 1961 the program for manpower data processing was completed, and 
the system is now operating throughout the organization, though some technical 
problems still remain to be solved. 




OTTER RAPIDS GENERATING STATION — The lights at the project seem to accentuate the surrounding 
gloom of the northern winter night. At this construction site in the northern part of the province dark- 
ness closes in as early as 4 PM in the depth of winter. 



Operating Results — 1961 21 

COMBINED SYSTEMS— 1961 

Operating Results 

Gross revenue from the sale of primary power and energy amounted to 
$238,502,193 in 1961, exceeding that in 1960 by $7,520,249, or 3.3 per cent. 
This revenue was derived from municipal electrical utilities and interconnected 
systems purchasing power for resale, from industrial customers served directly by 
the Commission, and from customers served by Commission-owned local and rural 
distribution facilities. The 3.3 per cent gain, though reflecting a rising trend of the 
economy as it emerged from a period of recession early in the year and picked up 
markedly in the third and fourth quarters, is less than the long-term average. 

The cost of providing service was $235,448,876, an increase of $6,811,942 
or 3.0 per cent over cost in 1960. An increase in fixed costs, and a decline in 
revenue from secondary energy sales which is applied as an offset against costs, 
were the main factors contributing to the higher costs in 1961. They were offset 
to some extent by a net withdrawal from the stabilization of rates and contingencies 
reserve of $2,906,583 as compared with a net provision in 1960 of $4,483,759. 
An additional factor in offsetting higher costs was an increase of $2,335,597 in the 
relief for matured sinking fund. The demand for electric power expressed in terms 
of the average of monthly peak loads rose by 4.7 per cent over that of 1960. As 
this is greater than the 3 per cent increase in gross costs referred to previously, the 
average cost per kilowatt of supplying primary power to all customers was down 
from the previous year. 

The excess of revenue over the cost of providing service amounting to 
$3,053,317 was distributed as follows: 

Credited to cost-contract municipalities — 

Southern Ontario System $2,727,387 

Northern Ontario Properties 78,291 

Debited to Rural Power District Stabilization of Rates and Contin- 
gencies Reserve, Southern Ontario System 330,874 

Transferred to Statement of Surplus, Northern Ontario Properties . . 578,513 



$3,053,317 



Financial Summary 

The Commission's total assets at December 31, 1961, after eliminating the 
inter-system account, were $2,779,738,127 as compared with $2,660,258,017 at 
December 31, 1960. The long-term debt at December 31, 1961 was $1,918,285,085, 
an increase of $74,228,777 during the year. Capital of $530,846,480 at the end of 
1961 comprised $414,610,127 contributed through sinking fund for the purpose of 
retiring long-term debt, $115,917,808 in Provincial contributions for assistance in 
construction of rural distribution facilities, and $318,545 of surplus arising from 
the supply of power to customers in northern Ontario served for the account of 
the Province. 



22 



Finance 



The gross expenditure on fixed assets during 1961 was, with the single excep- 
tion of 1955, the lowest in the last thirteen years and amounted to $123,656,380 
of which 63.0 per cent was for power generating facilities. The extension or im- 
provement of rural distribution facilities required the expenditure of $18,425,162, 
or 14.9 per cent of the total gross expenditure on fixed assets, while transmission 
facilities accounted for 9.3 per cent, transformation for 8.6 per cent, and other 
facilities, including administrative and service buildings and equipment, for the 
balance of 4.2 per cent. After allowing for sales and retirements amounting to 
$22,897,919, there was a net increase of $100,758,461 in the investment in fixed 
assets, bringing the total to $2,461,609,257. This total includes $274,324,176 in 
rural fixed assets. Accumulated depreciation provided on fixed assets amounted to 
$305,253,151 at December 31, 1961. 

The capital construction program, reflecting current economic trends, was 
maintained at a level commensurate with the Commission's obligations with respect 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

FIXED ASSETS, CAPITAL, 
AND LONG-TERM LIABILITIES 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 



1,500 



FIXED ASSETS AT COST 



LONG-TERM 
LIABILITIES 



CAPITAL 




/ 



/ 



2,000 



1.500 



1.000 



500 



Financial Summary 23 

to Operations and service. Borrowing was restricted in 1961 to $100 million, the 
same as in 1960. 

The Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies was $145,192,825 
at December 31, 1961, down $1,478,880 from the 1960 level following with- 
drawals to stabilize rates and to offset retroactive charges applicable to certain 
classes of equipment for which service lives were revised during the year. The 
Commission maintains this reserve as an insurance fund for the protection of the 
municipal electrical utilities, rural customers, and direct industrial customers alike, 
against such contingencies as sharp swings in economic activity, unfavourable 
stream-flows at hydro-electric generating stations, physical catastrophe, and risk 
of foreign exchange loss at maturity of bonds payable in United States funds. The 
reserve is not meant to be used for absorbing normal increases in costs. 

The funds required by the Commission for capital investment and other pur- 
poses in 1961 were obtained from sources as shown in the following table: 

STATEMENT OF SOURCE AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 

$ 
'000 omitted 

I'UNDs Provided: 

From issue of $100 million of bonds, net of discount and bond issue 

expense 97,084 

From operations — 

Charges to cost of power not requiring an outlay of cash: 

Net provision and interest added to reserves for stabilization of 
rates and contingencies, and sinking fund, and to accumulat- 
ed depreciation 71 ,843 

Provision for frequency standardization 9,807 

Miscellaneous 2,973 84,623 



Total 181,707 



FOUNDS Applied: 

Expenditures on fixed assets, $123,656,000 less proceeds from sales, etc. 113,937 
Retirement of Commission bonds and repayment of Provincial ad- 
vances , 24,632 

Purchases of general and sinking fund investments, less proceeds from 

sales and maturities 16,792 

Expenditures on nuclear research 1,643 

Increases in inventories and work orders 2,039 

Miscellaneous 2,542 

Net increase in working capital 20,122 



Total , 181,707 



OPERATING RESULTS BY SYSTEMS— 1961 

Southern Ontario System 

The cost of providing service in 1961, after a net withdrawal of $2,835,225 
from the StabiHzation of Rates and Contingencies Reserve, amounted to 
$194,555,672, an increase of 3.3 per cent over total costs in 1960, which in that 
year included the provision of $4,856,449 for stabilization of rates and contingen- 
cies. Gross revenue from the sale of primary power and energy at $196,952,185 
was up by 3.2 per cent compared with revenue in 1960. Revenue from the sale of 



24 



Finance 



secondary electric energy applied as an offset against cost declined by $5,108,838 
or 63.2 per cent, to a total of $2,973,744, of which $2,342,098 was derived from 
60-cycle export and $631,646 from other secondary sales. The gross revenue 
figure and the revenue from secondary sales together apply to the 28,286,973,573 
kilowatt-hours which are the Southern Ontario System's share of the total Com- 
mission sales, wholesale and retail, as shown in the table on pages 106 and 107. 

Operating costs, including the cost of power purchased, increased by 3,8 per 
cent over those in 1960. Interest charges were up by 4.5 per cent over those in 
1960 after allowing for interest relief in respect of matured sinking funds. Fre- 
quency standardization charges were 7.5 per cent down from 1960, while deprecia- 
tion charges were up by 14.9 per cent. The net provision for the retirement of long- 
term debt exceeded that in 1960 by 2.0 per cent. The net interchange with the 
Northern Ontario Properties decreased by 35.4 per cent in terms of energy, reduc- 
ing the credit to the Southern Ontario System by $1,255,710 or 27.9 per cent from 
that of 1960. The balance of the change in the cost of providing service arose from 
the decline in secondary energy sales and the adjustments to costs for rate stabili- 
zation to which reference has already been made. 

Northern Ontario Properties 

The cost of providing service to all customers in the Northern Ontario Prop- 
erties totalled $40,893,204 in 1961 after a net withdrawal of $71,358 from the 




FIRST COAL DELIVERY AT LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION — In May 1961, the first deliveries of 
coal were made to the pile which will eventually store up to 2.5 million tons. The coal-handling installa- 
tions will ultimately be capable of moving 4,000 tons per hour to the coal-pile from self-unloading 
vessels at the docks, and 2,000 tons per hour from the coal-pile to the bunkers. 



Operating Results by Systems 25 

Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies. This was 1.3 per cent greater 
than the comparable cost in 1960 when the net withdrawal from the Stabilization 
of Rates Reserve amounted to $372,690. Revenue from the sale of secondary elec- 
tric energy applied as an offset against cost amounted to $1,564,338, an increase of 
41.1 per cent over the corresponding figure for 1960. Gross revenue from the sale 
of primary power and energy amounted to $41,550,008, an increase of 3.6 per 
cent over the 1960 revenue despite a decline in the average of the monthly peak 
loads. This was due principally to the full-year effect of a $3.50 per kilowatt rate 
increase to direct industrial customers introduced towards the end of 1960. The 
gross revenue figure and the revenue from secondary sales together apply to the 
6,519,699,936 kilowatt-hours which are the Northern Ontario Properties' share of 
the total Commission sales, wholesale and retail, as shown in the table on pages 
106 and 107. 

Operating costs, including the cost of power purchased, showed an increase 
of 0.2 per cent over 1960 costs. Interest charges were higher by 10.6 per cent after 
allowing for interest relief in respect of prepaid and matured sinking funds. Depre- 
ciation charges were 7.1 per cent higher than in 1960, and the net provision of 
funds for the retirement of long-term debt exceeded that in 1960 by 5.8 per cent. 
Partly offsetting these increases was a decline of 27.9 per cent in the cost of inter- 
change of power with the Southern Ontario System and of 6.5 per cent in the 
charges for frequency standardization. The balance of the change in the cost of 
providing service arose from an increase in secondary energy sales and a reduction 
in withdrawals from the Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies, to 
which reference was made earlier in the text. 



26 Finance 

THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 

SOUTHERN 

BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 

FixKD Assets at Cost 

In service $ 1,931,060,201 

Under construction 52,049,680 



$ 1,983,109,881 
Less accumulated depreciation 249,829,995 



-$ 1,733,279,886 



Frequency Standardization: 

Cost of completed standardization after cliarging $167,224,494 
to reserves and cost of power — balance to be written off 
in future years 178,864,517 

Current Assets: 

Cash _ $ 40,652,920 

Temporary investments in government and govermnent- 

guaranteed securities, at market \ alue 16,110,585 

Accounts receivable 28,073,734 



84,837,239 



Inventories Held for Operation, Maintenance, and 
Construction: 

Coal at cost $ 12,888,610 

Other materials and supplies at cost 11,564,634 

Tools and equipment at cost less depreciation 10,879,181 



35,332,425 



Deferred Charges and Other Assets: 

Debenture discount and expense less amounts written off . . .$ 16,649,003 

Deferred work orders and other assets 6,332,913 

Customers' securities on deposit 192,150 



23.174.066 



Reserve Fund Investments: 

Investments held at amortized cost plus accrued interest on 
special reserve investments (approximate market value 
$255,951,000)— 

Special reserves $ 131,195,847 

General reserve 1 15,229,822 

Sinking fund 15,666,744 

262,092,413 

$ 2,317,580,546 
Auditors' Report 

We have examined the balance sheet of the Southern Ontario System of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of 
Ontario as at December 31, 1961 and the statement of operations for the year ended on that date. Our examination 
included a general review of the accounting procedures and such tests of accounting records and other supporting 
evidence as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion the accompanying balance sheet and statement of operations present fairly the financial position of 
the Southern Ontario System of the Commission as at December 31, 1961 and the results of the operations for the 
year ended on that date. 

CLARKSON, GORDON & CO. 

Chartered Accountants. 
Toronto, Canada, 
June 29, 1962. 



I 



Southern Ontario System — Balance Sheet 27 

COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

ONTARIO SYSTEM 

AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1961 

LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND CAPITAL 

Long-term Liabilities (including $11,007,810 maturing in 1962): 

Funded debt (at par of exchange) $ 1 ,905,826,000 

Less — issued to finance Northern Ontario Properties, a 

separate trust operated by the Commission 346,272,545 

$ 1,559,553,455 
Advances from the Province of Ontario (at par of 

exchange) $13,662,357 

Less advances for Northern Ontario Properties 2,429,902 

11,232,455 

$ 1,570,785,910 
Less exchange discount (net) incurred on funded debt 

payable in United States funds 668,105 

$ 1,570,117,805 



Current Liabilities: 

Accounts and payrolls payable and accrued charges $ 20,732,683 

Customers' deposits 759,619 

Interest accrued on long-term liabilities 22,377,062 

Northern Ontario Properties — current account 10,689,058 

54.558,422 



Special Reserves: 

Pension fund . •;;..; $ 128,278,854 

Employer's liability insurance fund 3,098,399 

Employees' savings and insurance fund 301,035 

131,678,288 



General Reserve: 

Stabilization of rates and contingencies 126,097,635 



Capital: 

Sinking fund reserve: 
Represented by — - 

Funded debt and Provincial advances 

retired through sinking funds $323,942,663 

Sinking fund investments 15,664,644 

$ 339,607,307 

Contributed capital: 

Province of Ontario, assistance for rural construction. . . 95,521,089 

435,128,396 

$ 2,317,580,546 



Note: Commitments under uncompleted contracts for the construction of fixed assets, 
approximately $50,000,000. 



28 Finance 

NORTHERN ONTARIO 

Held and Operated by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario in 

BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 

Fixed Assets at Cost: 

In service $ 423,758,182 

Under construction 54,741,194 



$ 478,499,376 
Less accumulated depreciation 55,423,156 



-$ 423,076,220 



Frequency Standardization: 

Cost of completed standardization after charging $1,403,995 

to cost of power — balance to be written off in future years .... 3,336,883 



Current Assets: 

Cash $ 305,612 

Accounts receivable 5,935,119 

The Hvdro- Electric Power Commission of Ontario — current 

account 10,689,058 

16,929,789 



Inventories Held for Operation, Maintenance, and 
Construction: 

Materials and supplies at cost $ 800,515 

Tools and equipment at cost less depreciation 507,236 



1,307,751 



Deferred Charges and Other Assets: 

Debenture discount and expense less amounts written off $ 4,280,604 

Account receivable in annual instalments 1962-1989 1,722,928 

Customers' securities on deposit 1,540,762 

Deferred work orders and other assets 555,881 



8,100,175 



Reserve Fund Investments: 

Investments held for reserves at amortized cost (approximate 
market value $17,560,000)— 

General reserve $ 14,832,943 

Sinking fund 5,262,878 



20,095,821 
$ 472,846,639 



Auditors' Report 

We have examined the balance sheet of the Northern Ontario Properties held and operated by The Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission of Ontario in trust for the Province of Ontario and municipalities supplied with power at cost, as 
at December 31, 1961, and the statements of operations and surplus for the year ended on that date. Our examination 
included a general review of the accounting procedures and such tests of accounting records and other supporting 
evidence as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion the accompanying balance sheet and statements of operations and surplus present fairly the financial 
position of the Northern Ontario Properties as at December 31, li^fil and the results of the operations for the year 
ended on that date. 

CLARKSON, GORDON & CO. 

Chartered Accountants. 
Toronto, Canada, 
June 29, 1962. 



Northern Ontario Properties — Balance Sheet 



29 



PROPERTIES 

Trust for the Province of Ontario and Municipalities Supplied with Power at Cost 
AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1961 

LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND CAPITAL 

Long-term Liabilities (including $3,225,856 maturing in 1962): 

Funded debt (at par of exchange) $ 346,272,545 

Advances from the Province of Ontario (at par of exchange). . . . 2,429,902 



Less exchange discount (net) incurred on funded debt payable 
in United States funds 

Representing the portion of the funded debt and advances from 
the Province of Ontario owing b>' The H\dro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario, issued to finance Northern Ontario 
Properties. 



$ 348,702,447 



535,167 



$ 348,167,280 



Current Liabilities: 

Accounts and payrolls payable and accrued charges. 

Customers' deposits 

Interest accrued on long-term liabilities 



1,696,936 
3,862,508 
4,306,641 



9,866,085 



General Reserve: 

Stabilization of rates and contingencies. 



19,095,190 



Capital: 

Sinking fund reserve: 

Province of Ontario $ 59,442,367 

Municipalities supplied with power at cost. . . . 15,560,453 



$ 75,002,820 



Represented by — 

Funded debt and Provincial advances retired 

through sinking funds $ 69,749,170 

Sinking fund investments 5,253,650 



$ 75,002,820 



Contributed capital: 

Province of Ontario, assistance for rural construction 20,396,719 



Surplus arising from supply of power to customers served for the 
account of the Province of Ontario 



318,545 



95,718,084 
$ 472,846,639 



30 Finance 

THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 
for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



Power 
System 



Rural Power 
District 



Total 



Cost of Primary Power: 

Cost of power purchased 

Operation, maintenance, and administrative 

expenses 

Interest (including interest on long-term liabilities 
and reserves, less interest earned on invest- 
ments) 

Frequency standardization: 

Interest 

Portion of cost written ofif 

Depreciation 

Sinking fund provision — contribution to system 
capital 



Interchange of power with Northern Ontario 

Properties 

Sale of 60-cycle secondary export energy 

Sale of other secondary energy 

Credit resulting from matured sinking funds: 

I nterest 

Principal 

Net withdrawal from stabilization of rates reserve 



Net cost of power supplied to Rural Power 
District 



Total costs, after net withdrawal from stabilization 
of rates reserve 



Amounts Billed for Primary Power: 

Municipalities (at interim rates) 

Direct industrial customers and interconnected 

systems 

Local distribution system customers 

Rural customers 



12,922,870 
53,830,068 

64,583,199 

7,242,368 

9,683,567 

15,126,023 

17,012,676 



180,400,771 

3,247,089 

2,342,098 

631,646 

2,512,378 
661,383 

2,835,225 



168,170,052 
20,988,302 



147,181,750 



126,031,436 

23,767,234 
110.467 



Total . 



149,909,137 



Excess or deficiency of amounts billed over cost 

Credited to municipalities on annual adjustment. 
Transferred to stabilization of rates reserve 



2,727,387 
2,727,387 



13,039,619 
4,947,741 

'7,030,676 
1,367,584 



12,922,870 
66,869,687 

69,530,940 

7,242,368 

9,683,567 

22,156,699 

18,380,260 



26,385,620 



206,786,391 

3,247,989 

2,342,098 

631,646 

2,512,378 
661,383 

2,835,225 



26,385,620 
20.988.302 



194,555,672 



47.373.922 



194.555.672 



47,043,048 



126,031,436 

23,767,234 

110,467 

47,043,048 



47,043,048 



196,952,185 



330,874 
330,874 



2,396,513 

2,727,387 

330.874 



Statements of Operations 



31 



NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES 

Held and operated by The Hydro- Electric Power Commission of Ontario in trust for the 
Province of Ontario and municipalities supplied with power at cost 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 
for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



Cost of Primary Power: 

Cost of power purchased 

Operation, maintenance and ad- 
ministrative expenses 

Interest (including interest on long 
term liabilities and reserves, less 
interest earned on investments) 

Frequency standardization: 

Interest 

Portion of cost written off 

Depreciation 

Stabilization of rates and contin 
gencies provision 

Sinking fund provision — contribu 
tion to system capital 



Customers served for the account 
of the Province of Ontario 



Rural 
Power 
District 



Interchange of power with Southern 
Ontario System 

Sale of secondary energy 

Credit resulting from prepaid and 
matured sinking funds: 

Interest 

Principal 



Cost of power to municipalities sup- 
plied at cost 

Cost of power supplied to Rural 
Power District 

Withdrawals from stabilization of 
rates reserve 



Total costs, including provision for 
and withdrawals from stabiliza 
tion of rates reserve 



AmountsBilledt^orPrimaryPower : 
Municipalities supplied with power 

at cost (at interim rates) 

Fixed-rate municipalities 

Direct industrial, and other cus- 
tomers 

Local distribution system customers 
Rural customers 



Total. 



Excess or deficiency of amounts billed 
over cost 



Credited to municipalities on an- 
nual adjustment 



_ Transferred to statement of surplus 



2,025,847 



807,560 



Other 
customers 



1,175.715 



221,120 



4,230,242 



4,230,242 



3,176,157 
344,524 



7,061,875 



6,917,037 



6,917,037 



144,838 



% 

818,661 
13,210,199 

14,609,808 

172,722 

123,506 

3,122,257 

898,858 

3,720,636 



Total 



36,676,647 

3,247,989 
1,564,338 



529,363 
197.757 



37,633,178 
6,419,217 
3J76J57 



28,037,804 



215,205 

25,295,147 
3,250,803 



$ 
818,661 
15,236,046 

15,417,368 

172,722 

123,506 

4,297,972 

898,858 

3,941,756 



Munici- 
palities 
supplied 
with power 
at cost 



40,906,889 

3,247,989 
1,564,338 



529,363 
197,757 



41,863,420 
6,419,217 

344,524 



35,099,679 



215,205 

25,295,147 
3,250,803 
6,917,037 



28,761,155 



723,351 



35,678,192 



578.513 



Total 



% 
818,661 
15,236,046 

15,417,368 

172,722 

123,506 

4,297,972 

898,858 

3,941.756 



6,419,217 



625,692 



5,793,525 



5.871.816 



5,871,816 



78,291 
78,291 



578,5131 



40,906,889 

3,247,989 
1,564,338 



529,363 
197,757 



41.863.420 



970,216 



40,893,204 



5,871,816 
215,205 

25,295,147 
3,250,803 
6.917,037 



41,550,008 



656,804 
78,291 



578,513 



Statement of Surplus for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 

Balance at debit January 1, 1961 $ 259,968 

Add net surplus from operations for the year ended December 31, 1961 578,513 

Balance at credit December 31, 1961 $ 318,545 



32 



Finance 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
FUNDED DEBT AS AT 



Date of maturit\' 



Callable on or after 



Date of issue 



Interest rate 



PAYABLE IN CANADIAN FUNDS — Guaranteed as to principal and interest by the Province of Ontario: 



February 

March 

March 

October 

May 

May 

July 

October 

April 

December 

January 

March 

May 

January 

March 

April 

April 

November 

November 

January 

April 

October 

July 

July 

July 

November 

January 

February 

April 

July 

October 

February 

June 

November 

June 

July 

October 

August 

January 

November 

March 

April 

March 

October 

May 

July 

October 

February 

July 

February 

November 



15 


1962 


1 


1963 


1 


1963 


15 


1963 


15 


1964 


15 


1964 


2 


1964 


15 


1964 


1 


1965 


15 


1965 


15 


1966 


1 


1966 


1 


1966 


15 


1967 


15 


1967 


1 


1967 


1 


1967 


1 


1967 


1 


1967 


15 


1968 


15 


1968 


1 


1968 


1 


1969 


15 


1969 


15 


1969 


1 


1969 


1 


1970 


15 


1970 


1 


1970 


15 


1970 


15 


1970 


15 


1971 


1 


1971 


15 


1971 


15 


1973 


15 


1974 


15 


1974 


15 


1975 


15 


1976 


15 


1976 


1 


1977 


1 


1977 


1 


1978 


15 


1978 


15 


1979 


1 


1979 


15 


1979 


15 


1980 


15 


1980 


15 


1981 


15 


1983 



March 
March 



1, 1961 
1, 1962 



May 


15 


1962 


July 


2 


1960 


October 


15 


1963 


April 


1 


1964 


December 


15 


1963 


January 


15 


1964 


March 


1 


1965 


May 


1 


1964 


January 


15 


1965 


March 


15 


1964 


April 


1 


1965 


April 


1 


1964 


November 


1 


1964 


November 


1 


1964 


lanuary 


15 


1966 


April 


15 


1966 


October 


1 


1965 


July 


15 


1966 


July 


15 


1966 


November 


1 


1967 


February 


15 


1968 


April 


1 


1968 


October 


15 


1969 


June 


1 


1961 


June 


15 


1971 


Julv 


15 


1972 


October 


15 


1972 


August 


15 


1972 


, anuary 


15 


1974 


November 15 


1974 


March 


1 


1975 


April 


1 


1974 


March 


1 


1976 


October 


15 


1976 


May 


15 


1974 


October 


15 


1974 


February 


15 


1978 


July 


15 


1978 


February 


15 


1979 


November 15 


1980 



February 15 
March 1 

March 1 

October 15 
November 15 
May 15 

July 2 

October 15 
April 1 

December 15 
January 15 
March 
May 
January 
March 
April 
April 
November 



November 1 



July 

April 

October 

July 

Julv 

July 



No\ember 1 



January 

February 

April 

July 

October 

February 

June 



November 15 



June 

July 

October 

February 

January 

November 

March 

April 

March 

October 

Mav 

July 

October 

February 

July 

February 



November 15 



1957 
1948 
1955 
1958 
1957 
1954 
1948 
1956 
1957 
1948 
1956 
1958 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1949 
1947 
1952 
1952 
1949 
1952 
1947 
1959 
1953 
1953 
1949 
1930 
1960 
1950 
1960 
1958 
1961 
1946 
1961 
1950 
1956 
1956 
1957 
1956 
1957 
1955 
1957 
1958 
1958 
1954 
1959 
1954 
1960 
1960 
1961 
1961 



per cent 

3 
3 
4 
5 
3 
3 

5 

3 

3M 

4 

3^ 

4 

4M 

3 

2% 

4M 

4M 

3 

4 

2% 

5H 

4M 

4M 

3 

6 

3 

4>^ 

2H 

3 
4 
4^ 

4 

5 

3H 

5 

41^ 

5 

5H 

sy2 

6 

5^ 
5^ 
5H 



Statement of Funded Debt 



COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 
DECEMBER 31, 1961 



33 



Principal outstanding December 31, 1961 



Southern Ontario System 


Northern Ontario Properties 


Total 


$ 
8,367,500 


$ 
2,990,000 


$ 
11,357,500 


22,324,000 


7,343,000 


29,667,000 


22,651,000 




22,651,000 


12,928,000 


■6,700,000 


19,628,000 


3,584,500 


9,598,000 


13,182,500 


12,736,500 


902,000 


13,638,500 


23,884,000 


13,371,500 


37,255,500 


12,952,500 




12,952,500 


15,688,500 


1,699,000 


17,387,500 


42,567,000 




42,567,000 


10,407,500 


" 1,655,500 


12,063,000 


29,401,000 


5,737,500 


35,138,500 


21,912,500 


4,450,000 


26,362,500 


41,887,000 




41,887,000 


31,991,500 




31,991,500 


9,823,500 


31,674',000 


41,497,500 


10,410,455 


3,916,545 


14,327,000 


17,409,500 


1,812,000 


19,221,500 


29,532,500 




29,532,500 


36,143.000 


'6,275,000 


42,418,000 


42,799,500 




42,799,500 


13,450^000 


'5,800',000 


19,250,000 


10,000,000 


3,000,000 


13,000,000 


31,971,500 




31,971,500 


234141500 
37,800,000 




23 114,500 


11,433,000 


49,233,000 


10,339,500 
11,200,000 




10,339,500 


■4,800",000 


16,000,000 


47,578,000 


5,300,000 


52,878,000 


3,800,000 


1,600,000 


5,400,000 


3,700,000 


1,600,000 


5,300,000 


3,700,000 


1,600,000 


5,300,000 


13,745,000 


4,290,000 


18,035,000 


3,600,000 


3,600,000 


7,200,000 


52,000,000 


2,300,000 


54,300,000 


42,591,000 


7,000,000 


49,591,000 


26,592,500 




26,592,500 


25,063,000 


i i ,740,000 


36,803,000 


42,500,000 


7,500,000 


50,000,000 


10,875,000 


25,130,000 


36,005,000 


26,200,000 


13,000,000 


39,200,000 


73,262,000 


7,660,500 


80,922,500 


30,080,000 


6,400,000 


36,480,000 


32,900,000 


16,300,000 


49,200,000 


31,500,000 


3,500,000 


35,000,000 


28,000,000 


9,000,000 


37,000,000 


41,975,000 


8.000,000 


49,975,000 


23,800,000 


10,200,000 


34,000,000 


31,200,000 


13,385,000 


44,585,000 


31,300,000 


13,400,000 


44,700,000 


21,400,000 


21,400,000 


42,800,000 


1,244,638,455 


317,062,545 


1,561,701,000 



34 



Finance 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 
FUNDED DEBT AS AT 



Date of maturity 


Callable on or after 


Date of issue 


Interest rate 


PAYABLE IN UNITED STATES FUNDS — Held by Province 


of Ontario and having terms identical with 


March 15, 1962 


March 15, 1959 


March 15, 1954 


2.70 


March 15, 1963 


March 15, 1959 


March 15, 1954 


2.75 


March 15, 1964 


March 15, 1959 


March 15, 1954 


2.80 


May 15, 1971 


May 15, 1956 


May 15, 1951 


3M 


September 1, 1972 


September 1, 1956 


September 1, 1951 


3M 


February 1, 1975 


February 1, 1958 


February 1, 1953 


3M 


November 1, 1978 


November 1, 1958 


November 1, 1953 


3^ 


March 15, 1980 


March 15, 1959 


March 15, 1954 


^Vs 


May 15, 1981 


Mav 15, 1961 


May 15, 1956 


3K 


February 1, 1984 


February 1, 1969 


February 1, 1959 


m 



Total funded debt (at par of exchange) 

Summary of changes in funded debt 

Outstanding at January 1, 1961 

Less redemptions during year 

Add new bond issues during year 

Outanding at December 31, 1961 



ADVANCES FROM THE PROVINCE OF 



Annuity bonds repayable to the Province in accordance with the terms of Province 



Date of maturity 


Interest rate 


May 15, 1962-1968 


per cent 
4 


May 15, 1962-1970 


43^ 


January 15, 1962-1971 . 


4J^ 
4 


[une 1, 1962-1971 



Total advances (at par of exchange) 



Summary of changes in advances from the Province 

Balances of advances at January 1, 1961 

Less repayments during >'ear 

Balances of advances at December 31 , 1961 



Statement of Funded Debt 

COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

DECEMBER 31, 1961— Concluded 



35 



Principal outstanding December 31, 1961 



Southern Ontario System | Northern Ontario Properties | 



Total 



issues sold in the United States by the Province of Ontario on behalf of the Commission. 



1,419,000 




1,419,000 
2,539,000 
2,504,000 
49,241,000 
42,850,000 
47,696,000 
48,966,000 
29,920,000 
44,390,000 
74,600,000 

344,125,000 

1,905,826,000 


2,539,000 




2,504,000 




46,351,000 
42,850,000 


2,890,000 


47,696,000 




43,966,000 
29,920,000 


5,000,000 


41,070,000 
56,600,000 

314,915,000 

1,559,553,455 


3,320,000 
18,000,000 

29,210,000 

346,272,545 



during the year ended December 31, 1961 



$1,520,399,955 
20,846,500 

$1,499,553,455 
60,000,000 

$1,559,553,455 



$309,800,545 
3,528,000 

$306,272,545 
40,000,000 

$346,272,545 



$1,830,200,500 
24,374,500 

$1,805,826,000 
100,000,000 

$1,905,826,000 



ONTARIO AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1961 



of Ontario bonds issued in part for the purposes of the Commission 

Balances of advances outstanding December 31, 1961 
{Payable in Canadian, United States, or Sterling funds) 



Southern Ontario System 


Northern Ontario Properties 


Total 


$ 
3,511,760 
3,261,111 
1,972,291 
2,487,293 

11,232,455 


$ 
237,181 
790,323 
484,477 
917,921 

$2,429,902 


$ 
3,748,941 
4,051,434 
2,456,768 
3,405,214 

13,662,357 



of Ontario during year ended December 31, 1961 



$12,404,760 
1,172,305 

$11,232,455 



$2,656,218 
226,316 

$2,429,902 



$15,060,978 
1,398,621 

$13,662,357 



SECTION III 



THE COMMISSION'S CUSTOMERS 



THE basis of partnership upon which the Hydro enterprise was founded is 
admirably demonstrated in the co-operative program undertaken by the Com- 
mission and the associated municipal utilities for developing and sustaining a well 
balanced load. 

The Load-building Program 

The success of the co-ordinated Commission-wide and locally oriented sales 
effort was clearly evident during 1961 in two specific sales campaigns. The first, 
called "Operation Eskimo", concentrated on sales of electric refrigerators and 
freezers; the later "Sunshine Special" was designed to increase the sale of electric 
dryers. Both involved the support of the utilities, and the co-operation of the elec- 
trical manufacturers, distributors, and appliance dealers. 

In a comprehensive analysis of its recent province-wide survey on the use of 
electric appliances and equipment in Ontario homes, the Commission has sought 
to assess consumer attitudes toward appliance servicing, and to evaluate the 
availability, cost, and quality of local repair services. A published report will be 
available to municipal utilities, manufacturers, distributors, dealers, contractors, 
and others concerned with the marketing of electricity and electric appliances and 
equipment. 

Subdividers and building contractors are being encouraged to take advantage 
of the higher than average sales appeal of Medallion homes. The Bronze Medallion 

36 



The Sales Program 



37 



Standard requires a 100-ampere service entrance, a 20-circuit distribution panel 
together with five special circuits extending from the panel to the range, dryer, 
and kitchen counter areas, the installation of a dual-element water-heater of at 
least 40-gallon capacity, planned lighting outlets, and one lighting feature installed. 
The Gold Medallion Standard raises this standard of excellence by increasing the 
number of distribution circuits to 24, and the number of major appliance circuits 
to seven, and calls for five lighting features. An electric-heating installation to meet 
the requirements of the Triple Seal of Quality of the Electric Heating Association 
of Ontario is also a Gold Medallion requirement. 

The Commission has introduced a plan whereby those responsible for sub- 
division development, if they will agree to meet Medallion Standards, can obtain 

at little added cost the attrac- 
tive, tidy, and spacious effect 
contributed by the under- 
ground installation of distribu- 
tion facilities. The initial out- 
lay the developers are required 
to make may be recovered 
from the Commission on the 
basis of a sliding scale related 
to the electric load likely to re- 
sult from the residential serv- 
ices installed. Some electrical 
utilities have also offered varia- 
tions of this plan to builders 
and subdividsrs. 

The Commission and the 
utilities installed 52,500 elec- 
tric water - heaters during 
1961, an increase of 25 per 
cent over the number installed 
in 1960. The introduction in 
1962 of a new optional billing 
method is expected to encour- 
age still further expansion of 
the market. Under the new 
method a bonus rate applic- 
able to a block of 400-500 
metered kilowatt-hours may be 
offered for water - heating 
where a residential installation meets specific performance standards. Customer 
satisfaction will be improved since the prospective customer, under this arrange- 
ment, will not be tempted to install a unit inadequate for his purpose. This was 
frequently a source of dissatisfaction under the flat-rate plan. 

The introduction in rural areas of a time-payment plan for rewiring older 
houses will help to remove the deterrent effect of outmoded wiring on the 
purchase of major items of electric equipment. While a number of utilities already 




LOAD BUILDING WITH ELECTRIC CLOTHES DRYERS — More 
than 15,000 electric clothes dryers were sold during the Sun- 
shine Special sales and load-building campaign in which the 
Commission co-operated with the municipal electrical utilities 
and with appliance manufacturers and dealers. A feature of 
the campaign was the presentation of an electric blanket 
as a premium to each purchaser of a dryer. 



38 



The Commission's Customers 



have similar plans in effect, the present plan is being recommended for general 
adoption by other utilities. 

In the early stages of the present program to encourage the use of electric 
space-heating, a special minimum house-heating rate of 1.5 cents per kilowatt- 
hour (net) was introduced, to apply where electricity was used to heat more than 
25 per cent of the floor area. The excellent response of the public, combined with 
the favourable characteristics of the space-heating load, has permitted a reduction 
in this rate by 10 per cent to 1.35 cents per kilowatt-hour (net) for the 1961-1962 
season. Studies are continuing with a view to a further lowering of the rate 
wherever possible. 

During the past year more than 900 electric house-heating installations were 
completed, and an additional 335 were under construction at the end of the year. 
The excellent response to electric heating for commercial establishments resulted 
in the installation of 18,000 kw of heating load during the year. By the end of the 
year 135 motels, 70 churches, 35 schools, and 15 apartment buildings were being 
heated electrically. There was increasing evidence of interest in electric heating for 
apartments, office buildings, and shopping centres. 

Twelve courses provided by the Academy of Lighting Arts resulted in the 
quahfication of 270 persons as lighting consultants. Among this number were 




■ 

GOLD MEDALLION HOME — The design for this charming home was featured in a well-known Cana- ff 

dion monthly magazine. As an example of the completely equipped electric home, heated electrically 
throughout, its completion was made the occasion for a publicity program under the combined sponsor- 
ship of the Commission, the local electrical utility, the builder, and the magazine publishers. 



Deliveries of Power in Wholesale Quantities 



39 



architects, contractors, and representatives of fixture manufacturers and distributors. 
There was increased activity in providing information and service for the solution 
of Hghting and display problems. During the year, 350 surveys and recommenda- 
tions were made. 

The results of extensive research and test installations have encouraged the 
expansion of the water-heater sales program into the commercial field. This devel- 
opment has been aided by the estabhshment of a flat rate for large installations 
with two elements of different capacities. 

Industrial Power Service 

The Commission has continued to encourage the economic use of power through- 
plantpower seminars, power-factor surveys, and close co-operation with other 
groups and organizations interested in the industrial use of electric power. 

Deliveries of Power in Wholesale Quantities 

The table on pages 106 and 107 indicates how the Commission in its wholesale 
operation disposed of the 34,994,281,000 kilowatt-hours of primary and secondary 
energy during 1961. This total was 1.3 per cent greater than the corresponding 
figure of 34,554,846,788 kilowatt-hours in 1960. 




ELECTRIC COOKING EQUIPMENT IN COMMERCIAL INSTALLATION — The gleam of ceramic tile and 

stainless steel is combined with clean, flameless cooking in this all-electric kitchen where meals are 

prepared for the staff of a large insurance company in downtown Toronto. 



40 



The Commission's Customers 




SPECIALIST TRAINING FOR ELECTRIC-HEATING SALES — The photograph shows only one section of the 
80 members of Commission and Utilities sales staffs who were attending an electric-heating training 
course held in the early autumn at the Commission's Niagara Falls Conference and Development Centre. 
The specialist instruction the group received equips them to conduct qualifying courses for electrical 
heating contractors in their own local areas. 



A 14 per cent decline in the kilowatt-hours of secondary energy delivered 
to the Commission's direct industrial customers and the interconnected systems, 
and a 5.5 per cent decline in the primary kilowatt-hours delivered to these same 
groups were more than offset by increased deliveries to the municipal electrical 
utilities and the rural operating areas. Of the total energy disposed of in wholesale 
quantities, the municipal utilities and local systems received 55.5 per cent, the 
direct industrial customers 24.7 per cent, the interconnected utilities 11.4 per cent, 
and the rural operating areas 8.4 per cent. 

The commentary that follows is confined for the most part to the wholesale 
aspect of the Commission's operations, since retail distribution of electricity by the 
municipal electrical utilities and by the Commission-owned local systems is dealt 
with in the municipal service supplement beginning on page 175. A brief analysis 
of rural distribution statistics, however, is included with the report on bulk supply 
to the rural operating areas so that the Commission's rural service may be 
considered as a whole. Supporting statistics on rural service, a schedule of rates, 
and a brief description of the classes of service are given in Appendix III. 

The number of ultimate customers served by the Commission and the 
associated municipal electrical utilities in 1961 was 1,938,897. 



Municipal Electrical Utilities and Local Systenii 



41 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES AND LOCAL SYSTEMS 

The total number of municipal systems being served by the Commission's 
transmission line networks at the end of 1961 stood at 382, unchanged from the 
number served at the end of 1960. This total includes 350 utilities served under 
cost contracts, 4 served under fixed-rate contracts, and 28 Commission-owned 
local systems. 

In 1961 London Township Hydro System was amalgamated with London 
Public UtiUties Commission, and the municipalities of Merritton and Port Dalhousie 
became part of the enlarged City of St. Catharines. On the other hand, the 
Villages of Beachburg and Killaloe Station both became cost-contract customers 
of the Commission effective January 1, 1961, so that the net change in the 
number of cost-contract utilities in the Southern Ontario System was a decrease 
of 1 to 325. The number of cost-contract utilities in the Northern Ontario 
Properties was increased by 1 to 25 when the Village of South River began taking 
power under a cost contract on April 4, 1961. Beachburg and Killaloe Station 
were formerly served over the Commission's rural distribution facilities, and 
South River was formerly supplied by a private company. 

The cost-contract municipal elec- 
trical utilities are billed monthly at 
an interim rate per kilowatt of peak 
load. The monthly peak load for a 
utility is the maximum average de- 
mand over a period of twenty con- 
secutive minutes in the month. As the 
system peak load usually occurs in 
December, the peak loads for that 
month are given for these utilities and 
for local systems in the statistical 
table (Statement "D") beginning on 
page 258. The sum of these loads in 
1961 was 3,818,399 kilowatts, an 
increase of 6.4 per cent over the 
3,588,542 kilowatts supplied in 1960. 
The energy supplied to the municipal 
utilities and local systems during 
1961 was 19,412,729,847 kilowatt- 
hours, an increase of 8.4 per cent 
over the 17,907,540,003 kilowatt- 
hours supplied in 1960. 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OE ONTARIO 

MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 
AND LOCAL SYSTEMS 

PRIMARY POWER AND ENERGY DELIVERED 




Annual Ener 

r 


gy 






1 


■ 












T 


1 ■ 


- 

























































1950 1955 1960 

^Maximum monthly sum of the coincident peak loads 



Each of the municipal electrical 
utilities is listed in the tables of finan- 
cial reports and operating statistics 

that form the larger part of the municipal service supplement beginning on page 
175. The books of account from which the financial information is derived are kept 
by the utilities in accordance with a standard accounting system designed by the 



42 



The Commission's Customers 



Commission for use by all utilities served under cost or fixed-rate contracts. These 
records are periodically inspected by the Commission's municipal accountants, and 
from time to time adjustments and improvements in accounting and office routine 
are recommended as the requirements of standardized methods may dictate. This 
type of assistance and supervision is directed towards ensuring the correct applica- 
tion of the standard accounting procedure and the uniform classification of revenues 
and expenditures. The work carried out by the Commission's municipal accountants 
on behalf of the municipal utilities does not constitute an audit of the accounts. For 
such an audit the municipalities must make their own arrangements. 



DIRECT INDUSTRIAL CUSTOMERS 
AND INTERCONNECTED SYSTEMS 

The industrial customers served directly by the Commission include mines 
in relatively isolated areas, and industrial enterprises of many types whose require- 
ments for power may exceed the supply capability of the local municipal or rural 
facilities. The number of customers being so supplied by the Commission at 
December 31, 1961 was 199 as compared with 211 at December 31, 1960. In 
addition, 14 independent utilities both within and beyond the borders of the 
Province have contracts with the Commission for the supply or interchange of 
power, but these are not industrial customers in the generally accepted sense. 
Their loads are therefore not included in the table of power and energy supplied 
to industrial customers, or in the historical chart on this page. 

The sum of the coincident pri- 
mary peak loads of the Commission's 
industrial customers reached a month- 
ly maximum of 1,296,063 kilowatts 
in September 1961, thereby register- 
ing a decline of 5.2 per cent from the 
March 1960 maximum of 1,367,708 
kilowatts. The annual energy deliv- 
ered in 1960 and 1961 is shown by 
types of industry in the accompanying 
table, together with comparative fig- 
ures on the average of the monthly 
peak loads in both years for each type 
of industry. These averages are con- 
sidered to be a better basis for com- 
parison than the peaks for any one 
month in the year. 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

DIRECT INDUSTRIAL CUSTOMERS 
PRIMARY POWER AND ENERGY DELIVERED 

ILLION MILLI 




Annual Energy 



I \ r 

1950 1955 1960 

Maximum monthly sum of the coincident peak loads 



Analysis of Primary Loads by 
Types of Industry 

The total primary energy deliv- 
ered to the Commission's direct in- 
dustrial customers declined by 4.8 
per cent, the third and largest decline 



Direct Industrial Customers and Interconnected Systemt 



43 




LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION — The rotor for the low-pressure section of Unit 1 is manoeuvred 

into position by the turbine-room service crane. This equipment v/as manufactured in the United Kingdom. 

Up to 60 per cent of the total cost of the turbo-generators for Units 3 to 6, hov/ever, is being spent in 

Canada, an interesting evidence of the rapid development of Canadian secondary industry. 



registered in the past 10-year period. The total number of customers represented does 
change from year to year, and certain customers at one time served by the Commis- 
sion are now supplied by their respective local utilities. To that extent these figures 
on energy delivered are not strictly comparable from year to year. Nevertheless 
the record of the Commission's energy deliveries to as many as 200 industrial 
users, including some of the major companies in their field, may be taken as a 
general indication of the state of the economy. It is evident from the number of 
declines recorded in the accompanying table that the industrial slackening already 
experienced in 1960 carried through well into 1961. Indeed, the year was in its 
third quarter before there was any evidence of improvement in loads. Thereafter, 
however, the climb was distinctly encouraging, and though not all the lost ground 
was recovered in 1961, there were evidences of strong upward pressure, particu- 
larly in the abrasives, chemical, and electrometallurgical groups in the Southern 
Ontario System, where power requirements during the second half of the year 
strongly supported growth trends approximating the long-term system rate of 
better than 6 per cent. 

The table of energy supplied to direct industrial customers shows that there 
were declines in energy deliveries to customers representing nearly 53 per cent 
of the total delivered. With the exception of Government services, a relatively minor 
segment of the total, even those industrial groups that had shown modest or 



44 



The Cotmuissiou^s Customers 



even notable gains in 1960 either levelled off sharply or shifted to a declining 
trend, while declines already evident in 1960 were somewhat accelerated. The 
encouraging feature of the year, however, was the improvement in the power 
requirements of customers in the Southern Ontario System towards the end of the 
year, a fact that gives good reason for an optimistic outlook for 1962. In northern 



Primary Power and Energy Supplied to Direct Industrial 
Customers, by Types of Industry 



Average of the 
monthly peak loads 



Type of industry 



1960 



1961 



kw kw 

Pulp and Paper 343,533 348,479 

Mining: 

(a) Gold 89,889 89,203 

(b) Silver and Cobalt 3,710 4,241 

(c) Base Metals 221,204 205,837 

(d) Uranium 86,626 58,826 

(e) Non-metals 6,304 6,448 

Quarrying, Cement, and Basic Building 

Materials 37,017 37,564 

Steel and Electrometallurgical 153,917 151,704 

Abrasives 70,709 59,629 

Chemical, Electrochemical, and Cyanamid 169,721 175,387 

Grain Elevators and Milling 7,968 5,437 

Transportation Services and Communications . . . 9,125 8,335 

Government Services and Institutions 25,972 32,612 

General Manufacturing 80,058 63,191 

Miscellaneous 7,428 10,160 

Total 1,313,181 1,257,053 



Annual energy delivered 







Increase 


1960 


1961 


or 




kwh 


decrease 


kwh 


per cent 


2,282,342,756 


2,292,831,506 


0.5 


607,729,896 


595,207,649 


2.1 


19,068,249 


21,812,663 


14.4 


1,559,451,380 


1,491,326,937 


44 


577,340,966 


392,527,096 


32.0 


28.407.210 


33,010,040 


16.2 


201,212,808 


193,782,158 


3.7 


852,273,366 


838,172,348 


1.7 


567,394,120 


479,879,320 


15. k 


1,308,934,983 


1,313,703,903 


0.4 


28,512,869 


17,332,237 


39.2 


40,191,985 


38,530,366 


u.i 


153,663,498 


164,084,678 


6.8 


377,563,845 


311,481,080 


17.5 


38,611,069 


44,678,664 


15.7 


8,642,704,000 


8,228,360,645 


4.8 



Ontario, however, the power requirements of the mining, and pulp and paper 
industries generally continue to fall well short of the companies' unduly optimistic 
forecasts of some years ago. The Commission, having developed resources to 
meet these forecasts, is therefore carrying greater than normal reserves of power 
where these loads predominate, particularly in the Northwestern Division. 

Primary Loads of Interconnected Systems 

The corresponding primary peak and energy loads of the interconnected 
systems were 60,019 kilowatts in 1961 as compared with 54,140 kilowatts in 
1960, and 351,995,374 kilowatt-hours in 1961 as compared with 439,086,355 
kilowatt-hours in 1960. The peak load was 10.9 per cent higher and the energy 
load 19.8 per cent lower in 1961 than in 1960. 



Rural Electrical Service 45 

Secondary Energy Sales 

Sales of secondary energy declined by 14 per cent in 1961 from the previous 
year's level of 4,714,805,404 kilowatt-hours in 1960 to 4,054,757,818 kilowatt- 
hours. The interconnected systems showed the larger decline from 4,267,047,937 
to 3,634,609,476 kilowatt-hours and the direct industrial customers a decline 
from 447,757,467 to 420,148,342 kilowatt-hours. 

RURAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

On March 24, 1911, the Legislature of the Province of Ontario enacted an 
amendment to The Power Commission Act with a view to facilitating rural 
electrification. Entitled "An Act to provide for the Local Distribution of Electrical 
Power", the measure permitted the Commission to enter into agreements with the 
Townships and with smaller rural communities, without the usual general approval 
of the electors, for the supply of power even to a single ratepayer provided he 
was prepared to meet the costs of the service made available. The Act was 
perhaps the first evidence on the North American continent of interest on the 
part of Government in extending rural electrification. It distinguishes this Province 
as a pioneer in bringing the benefits of electric power to the rural community. 
During the ensuing ten years agreements were negotiated with 35 local authorities, 
and at the end of this period a total of 306 miles of rural lines were serving 
approximately 2,900 customers. Since much of the work undertaken was by 
necessity experimental, operations under the 1911 legislation were in large part 
extensions of established municipal systems reaching out to serve adjacent rural 
areas. 

With the enactment of The Rural Hydro-Electric Distribution Act on June 1, 
1921, the Provincial Commission assumed a more important role in the administra- 
tion of its trusteeship for the developing rural distribution system, and became the 
channel through which the Government was prepared to advance for the benefit 
of agriculture and the rural community in general, 50 per cent of the capital cost 
of rural distribution facilities. Upon this act the pattern for four decades of 
subsequent rural expansion was firmly established. 

Thus Ontario Hydro, with the encouragement and support of the Provincial 
Government, embarked upon what was then a pioneering program in rural 
electrification. Given specified minimum customer densities per mile of line to be 
constructed, the undertaking on the Government's part to assume 50 per cent 
of the capital cost required to construct the rural distribution facilities enabled 
the Commission to relieve the ultimate customer of the burden of meeting 
charges for interest and repayment of principal on this much of the capital 
involved. The Commission, during these early years, continued to expand its 
rural facilities in any areas where customer densities were sufficient to meet 
requirements. Retail rates in each local rural district were adjusted as necessary 
to meet varying local distribution costs. Over the years, however, the extent of 
variation in rates from district to district was progressively reduced until in 1944 
rural rates became uniform for all classes of service except industrial power in a 
Rural Power District extending across the whole province. 



46 



The Coinitiissioti^s Customers 



Rural Power District 

NET INCREASE OR DECREASE IN MILEAGE OF PRIMARY LINES AND 
NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS DURING 1961 





Miles of 

primary 

line 


Number of customers 




Farm 


Residential 


Com- 
mercial 


Summer 


Power 




System and Region 


Rural 


Hamlet 


Com- 
mercial 


Other 


Total 


Southern Ontario System 

Western 

West Central and 

Niagara combined 

Central 

Georgian Bay 


1,301.93 

1,578.15 

10.82 

116.44 

144.24 

85.61 


5,871 

6,376 

292 

75 

9 

55 


524 

226 
108 
383 
135 
176 


12,615 

13,006 

1,685 

713 

997 

2,042 


54 

1,1,60 
91 

164 
62 

119 


18 

14 

6 

142 

108 

39 


1,056 

687 

95 

1,457 

1,274 

383 


80 

100 
50 
38 
19 
36 


5,172 

21,81,1 
1,527 
2,972 


East Central 


2,604 


Eastern 


2,850 


Total 


59.25 


658 


884 


20,18!, 


970 


327 


3,578 


37 


1 7,060 


Northern Ontario 
Properties 

Northeastern 

Northwestern 


64.97 
48.04 


553 
61,7 


589 

540 


1,521 
557 


102 
95 


36 
19 


87 
171 


1 


1,782 
736 


Total 


113.01 


1,200 


1,129 


2,078 


197 


55 


258 


1 


2,518 


Total— All systems 


172.26 


1,858 


2,013 


18,106 


773 


382 


3,836 


36 


n,5U2 



Italic figures indicate decreases. 



During the early years of readjustment to the new type of administration, 
increases in the number of customers served were small by recent standards. The 
proportional increases from year to year in the 1921 to 1930 decade were 
nevertheless little short of phenomenal. Between 1923 and 1924 the number 
increased by 150 per cent and the later years saw increases varying from 19 
to 38 per cent. A decline to 11 per cent in 1932 marked the beginning of a 
period of relatively little progress brought on by economic depression. A notable 
acceleration beginning in 1936 was again slowed almost to a halt in the middle 
years of the war in 1942 and 1943. This was followed by a really spectacular 
development over the years 1947 to 1950 inclusive, so that the decade 1942-1951 
saw by far the greatest 10-year increase up till that time in miles of line, 
customers served, and farm services provided. It remained for the decade 1952- 
1961 to register the greatest increase in the number of rural residential customers, 
and in dollars of revenue. 

At the end of 1961 the investment in rural facilities at cost was $274.3 
million, of which the Province of Ontario had contributed a total of $115.9 
million in the form of grant-in-aid. These faciUties were serving 484,749 customers, 
including 138,924 farm service customers. The rural distribution network included 
48,068 miles of primary line. 

Over the most recent 10-year period all classes of service have shown 
increases in customers, consumption, and revenue. With increased customer usage 
of facilities, the average cost per kilowatt-hour declined in 1961 for all services; 



Miles of Line and 1\ umber of Customers — Rural 



47 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



RURAL POWER DISTRICT 



NET INCREASE 
IN YEAR 



MILES OF PRIMARY LINE 



TOTAL AT 
END OF YEAF 



lU 



R 



1935 1940 1945 1950 



1960 



MET INCREASE 
IN YEAR 



NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS 



TOTAL AT 
END OF YEAR 




48 



The Cotutnission*s Customers 




CATTLE-FEEDING THE EFFORTLESS ELECTRIC WAY — This Lazy Susan type of silo is installed on a farm 
v/hich raisss a herd of a thousand beef cattle. The (armer can deliver ensilage mixed with diet supple- 
ments in the correct proportions to the feeding station without moving from the farm office where his 

control equipment is installed. 



for ail services, except summer service where tliere lias been little or no increase 
in average consumption, the cost per kilowatt-hour was lower in 1961 than in 1951. 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

RURAL POWER DISTRICT 
PRIMARY POWER AND ENERGY DELIVERED 

LLION MILLION 



07 



Annual Energy 



M 



1950 



^Maximum monthly sum of the coincident peak loads of the rural 
opsrating areas 



During 1961 the total number 
of rural customers served by the 
Commission declined by approxi- 
mately 14,500, the first decline in 50 
years of varied but continuous rural 
development. This check in growth is 
directly attributable to annexations by 
municipalities which, in their process 
of expansion, have absorbed certain 
adjacent rural areas usually having 
high population densities and concen- 
trated loads. Such suburban areas 
provide the strongest support for 
sound financial operations in the 
Rural Power District, which must 
also serve the outlying, sparsely set- 
tled areas, where the cost of service 
can exceed the revenue obtained. 
This trend in municipal annexation 
is not new, but in view of recent ex- 
tensive annexations, it does direct at- 
tention to a growing financial prob- 
lem. The rural service has been 



Load Growth 



Rural 



49 



Operated for half a century 
with general success. Since 
1944 there has been a prov- 
ince-wide uniform rate struc- 
ture. The problem confronting 
the rural district today is 
whether it can be expected to 
continue on a self-sustaining 
basis at acceptable rates, if the 
densely populated areas which 
are its best source of revenue 
continue to be absorbed by 
municipal utilities, while at 
the same time, the rural elec- 
trical facilities are required to 
reach out and serve a growing 
area of sparsely settled terri- 
tory where costs of service are 
inevitably high. 

This year's Report re- 
cords a reduction in the num- 
ber of rural operating areas 
from 100 to 97. In the West- 
ern Region, Dorchester Rural 
Operating Area was amalga- 
mated with London Rural Op- 
erating Area, the larger part of 
which had been annexed by 

London Public Utilities Commission. Mitchell Rural Operating Area, formerly in 
the West Central Region, and Plantagenet Rural Operating Area in the Eastern 
Region were also amalgamated with neighbouring areas. A rearrangement in 
regional administration resulted in the transfer of Clinton and Stratford Rural 
Operating Areas, somewhat expanded by amalgamation with parts of the former 
Mitchell Area, from the West Central Region to the Western Region. In view of 
the progressive amalgamation of the Niagara and West Central Regions t'lat took 
place during 1961, the rural statistics for these two regions have been combined in 
this Report. 




HYDROPONICS IN DAIRY-CATTLE FEEDING — In a building 
1 2 feet by 20 feet, 1 20 trays of green feed are developed 
under controiled light and heat conditions without benefit 
of soil. This provides each milking cow in the stable with 
1 2 pounds of green hydroponics feed per day in addition 
to the normal food complement. 



Load Growth 

The monthly sum of the coincident peak loads in the 97 rural operating areas 
was 667,816 kilowatts in December 1961, showing an advance of 3.2 per cent over 
the peak of 647,346 kilowatts in 1960. Energy supplied to the areas during the year 
rose by 3.4 per cent from 2,850,711,026 kilowatt-hours in 1960 to 2,946,437,316 
kilowatt-hours in 1961. 

All classes of service used more energy in 1961 than in 1960, the increases 
ranging from 2.4 per cent for hamlet and rural residential service to 10.2 per cent 



50 



The Commission's Customers 



for summer service. The latter was the only class of service to show an increase 
in the number of customers served. At 6.9 per cent increase in farm service 
consumption in conjunction with a decline of 1.3 per cent in the number of farm 
customers served resulted in a 7.8 per cent increase in average consumption per 
customer, and the seventh successive annual decline in average cost per kilowatt- 
hour for this class of service. This average cost was lower in 1961 than in any 

year since 1950. Average cost 
per kilowatt-hour also declin- 
ed in 1961 for the other four 
services, for hamlet and rural 
residential service and for in- 
dustrial power service to the 
lowest levels since 1949. While 
the largest proportional in- 
crease in revenue was the 7.9 
per cent registered by indus- 
trial power service, the largest 
increase in actual amount was 
that of $678,441 for farm 
service. In total revenue re- 
ceived during 1961, either 
farm service or the combined 
hamlet and rural residential 
service is larger than the three 
other services combined. To- 
gether, the farm and combined 
hamlet and rural residential 
services represent 70 per cent 
of the rural revenues received, 
and over 70 per cent of the 
energy sold. 




PHASE CONVERTER MEETS AN IRRIGATION PROBLEM — The 

phase converter installed on the distribution pole converts 

single-phase power to three-phase power for the operation of 

the 20-hp motor used for crop irrigation. 



During the year a new farm service rate schedule was introduced. The new 
schedule subdivides farm services into two groups, those with a monthly consump- 
tion of 2,000 kilowatt-hours or less, and all others, the latter having a minimum- 
demand rating of 10 kilowatts. Since the rate appHcable to any farm service is 
now completely divorced from the service-entrance capacity, customers can add 
major electric appliances and farm equipment to their loads without having to 
weigh the advantage against the cost of the possible application of a higher rate. 
The new schedule encourages the generous use of electricity in the farm home 
and in general farm operations. Under the revised schedule approximately 5 per 
cent of farm service customers received lower bills than under the former schedule, 
while the bills of other farm services were unchanged. 



Reports from the Regions 31 

REPORTS FROM THE REGIONS 

Western Region 

Many utilities in the Region continued programs of distribution system im- 
provement that were already under way. Others, with the promise of acceleration 
in load growth, established long-range programs for system rehabilitation over a 
period of years. 

The policy of London Public Utilities Commission is now to install under- 
ground service for all new subdivisions within the city limits. The municipalities of 
Brussels and Seaforth began replacing the distribution systems in business areas with 
underground systems, and at the same time modernized their street-lighting systems. 
Windsor Public Utilities Commission continued with a major rehabilitation pro- 
gram for street lighting. The Woodstock Commission began construction for a two- 
storey electrically heated office building at the site of its service centre. The 
Ingersoll Public Utilities Commission purchased and renovated a building to provide 
attractive accommodation for all utility departments. 

Niagara and West Central Regions 

During 1961, operations in these two regions were progressively amalgamated, 
and the completion of the process was officially recognized by the extension of the 
name Niagara Region to cover the combined regions, effective January 1, 1962. 
Administrative headquarters for the enlarged Niagara Region will be in Hamilton. 
Coincident with this change, administrative control of Clinton, Stratford, and 
Mitchell Rural Operating Areas, formerly in the West Central Region, was trans- 
ferred to the Western Region, which will now also include the former West 
Central Region municipalities of Blyth, Brussels, Clinton, Dublin, Goderich, 
Mitchell, St. Mar/s, Seaforth, Stratford, and Tavistock. 

The municipal utilities of St. Catharines and Welland have greatly expanded 
their operations, the former as the result of the amalgamation of the City with 
Merritton, Port Dalhousie, and part of Grantham Township, and the latter 
following the annexation of parts of the Townships of Crowland, Humberstone, 
Pelham, and Thorold. 

Several major utilities, including Brantford, Gait, Guelph, Hamilton, Kitch- 
ener, and Waterloo, either continued or initiated extensive construction of under- 
ground distribution facilities. Waterloo is proceeding with plans to install a new 
115 — 13.2-kv transformer station. 

New offices incorporating electric heating were constructed by the utilities 
in Burford, Caledonia, Dundas, and Elora. There is general interest among the 
utilities in the Region in the promotion of residential electric heating. Good 
progress was maintained in water-heater sales, and new water-heater rental pro- 
grams were initiated in Ayr, Brantford, Moorefield, and Paris. 

With the continued interest in improved street lighting, many utilities have 
been particularly active in modernizing their systems. 



52 



The Commission's Customers 



Central Region 

There was continued ac- 
tivity in new housing in most 
sections of the Region, par- 
ticularly in Ajax, Brampton, 
the suburban townships adja- 
cent to Toronto, and in the 
Markham and Richmond Hill 
Rural Operating Areas. In the 
City of Toronto and adjacent 
metropolitan municipalities, 
there has been a decided trend 
towards large apartment build- 
ings. Considerable interest in 
electric heating for these struc- 
tures has been indicated by 
the contractors and owners, 
and a number of electric-heat- 
ing installations are already 
well under way. 

The Toronto Hydro-Elec- 
tric System continued to ex- 
pand its underground network, and further extended its network facilities by the 




HEAT-PUMP INSTALLATION IN SHOPPING CENTRE — In the 
first electrically heated shopping centre in Canada, this heat- 
pump installed in the Thorncliffe Market Place in Metropolitan 
Toronto heats, and in accordance with the season, cools 
32,000 square feet of concourse and more than forty stores. 




ORILLIA WATER, LIGHT AND POWER COMMISSION OFFICE BUILDING 

Electric heating, air conditioning, and high-level illumination are among the modern features of this 

new building placed in service during 1961. Orillia first received electric power in 1902 over 19 

miles of transmission line from Ragged Rapids Generating Station on the Severn River, and thus 

became a pioneer community in the generation and use of electricity on this continent. 



Reports from the Regions 



53 



addition of 23.3 miles of duct. The total length of underground duct owned by the 
municipal system at the end of the year was 2,025 miles. 

The Village of Forest Hill 
constructed a new municipal 
building which will house the 
local electrical utility. Toronto 
Hydro-Electric System opened 
its new service building during 
1961. The new building, hav- 
ing a floor area of 160,000 
square feet, adjoins the Central 
Stores Building north of Mac- 
Pherson Avenue between Ma- 
dison Avenue and Huron 
Street. The Whitby Public 
Utilities Commission also 
opened a new service building 
and in addition completed ex- 
tensive alterations to its office 
building. 

In all, 14 municipally own- 
ed distributing stations, repre- 
senting a total additional in- 
stalled capacity of 63,000 kva, 
were added in the Region to- 
gether with 21 new 27.6-kv 
customer-owned substations to 
supply industrial lead growth 
amounting to 16,450 kva. 




Georgian Bay Region 

In Orillia, Alliston. 



and 



POLE PLACEMENT BY HELICOPTER — In the first full-scale 
operation of this kind by the Commission, a helicopter is 
shown placing a distribution pole, at least 800 pounds in 
weight, in a location inaccessible by road. The placement of 
each pole, including the helicopter's 24-mile round trip be- 
tween the pole-storage area and the site, required half an 
hour. 



Wasaga Beach the local utili- 
ties have provided new office buildings, all electrically heated. There has also been 
a general acceptance of electric heating throughout the Region, not only for private 
residences, but also for more extensive installations in motels, churches, and schools. 

In order to meet growing power requirements, the substation capacity was 
increased in the municipalities of Durham, Markdale, Paisley, and Wingham. In 
Port McNicoll the distribution-system voltage was changed from 4 to 8 kv. 



East Central Region 

There were increases in transformer capacity at two major substations in the 
Region, one in Belleville and one in Kingston, and these increases were accompanied 
by feeder and distribution-system changes as required. There were further major dis- 
tribution-system improvements in Newburgh and Picton. Among the number of 



54 The Commission's Customers 

Utilities engaged in improving and modernizing street lighting, Belleville, Cobourg, 
and Wellington in particular provided major expenditure for this purpose in 1961. 
The Kingston Public Utilities Commission provided an extensive low-cost under- 
ground distribution system in a new subdivision. 

An annexation by the Town of Lindsay of a section of adjacent rural area 
involved the local utility not only in the purchase of the associated rural facilities, 
but also in changes in the local feeder and distribution systems to accommodate 
the additional load. The utility also expanded its storeroom and garage facilities. 
The Port Hope Hydro-Electric Commission installed electric heating in its office 
building, using a heat pump and supplementary resistance heating. In Peterborough, 
a new operating centre was established and placed in operation by the local 
commission in 1961. It provides remote-control facilities for all the Peterborough 
substations. 



Eastern Region 

Two new cost-contract utilities were added in the Eastern Region at the 
beginning of 1961 after ratepayers in Beachburg and Killaloe Station had ap- 
proved by referendum the purchase of the distribution facilities within their 
respective communities, which had been formerly served as part of the Commis- 
sion's rural system. 

The Commission was able to provide assistance to two municipal utilities 
that experienced unfortunate fires in 1961. Additional power was supplied to 
Almonte during a two-month period following the fire that put one of the local 
generating units out of service on March 9. At Brockville a temporary substation 
was rushed into service when a fire following a severe electrical storm made the 
Municipal Station No. 1 completely unserviceable. Since the damaged station 
was already obsolescent, the Brockville Public Utilities Commission eventually 
replaced it with a new station. 

Sales activity was increased throughout the Region with notable success 
being achieved in Alfred, Hawkesbury, and Prescott. In Hawkesbury extensive 
relocation of homes and services has been required in anticipation of the proposed 
flooding occasioned by the Carillon Power Development of the Quebec Hydro- 
Electric Commission. The opening of a completely new section of the town has 
required the installation of new distribution facilities. In Smith's Falls a large 
new milk-processing plant scheduled for operation in mid- 1962, and having an 
estimated load of 2,300 kw, required the construction of additional 44-kv trans- 
mission and suitable transformation facilities. 



Northeastern Region 

With a view to load building, most utilities were engaged in some or all of the 
various programs devised for this purpose — appliance market surveys, the promo- 
tion of electric water-heating, Medallion homes, and electric space-heating. 



Public Relations and Services to Customers 55 

In order to provide adequately for service to existing and increasing loads in 
the Village of South River, which became a cost-contract municipal customer of 
the Commission in March 1961, considerable rehabilitation of the municipal distri- 
bution system was carried out. The Cochrane Public Utilities Commisson changed 
its distribution system for operation at a higher voltage in order to improve service. 
At Hearst, a major change at the local distribution station raised the station 
capacity to almost three times the former level. 

Northwestern Region 

The municipal utilities in the Region had a meeting in Port Arthur in Novem- 
ber 1961 to inaugurate a Northwestern District of the Association of Municipal 
Electrical Utilities. Though members of the Provincial Association, these utilities 
in the Northwestern Division had not previously established a local District organi- 
zation. 

In October, Mr. W. Ross Strike, Chairman of Ontario Hydro, laid the corner- 
stone for the recently completed electrically heated office building of the Terrace 
Bay Township Hydro System. In Rainy River the local electrical utility was able 
to introduce early in 1961 a general rate reduction averaging about 10 per cent. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS AND SERVICES TO CUSTOMERS 

The many unique features of the Commission's development are the basis 
for widespread interest on the part of the general public. During the past year 
249,000 persons visited those generating stations which were open for public 
inspection, and some 2,100 persons with particular professional or scientific in- 
terests took tours especially arranged. The Commission, in conjunction with 
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, established an information centre at the 
Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station site; additional facilities are being made 
available for the convenience of visitors, who numbered more than 42,000 in 1961. 

Exhibits at local fairs and other public displays were attended by approximately 
800,000 people, and screenings of Commission films of topical interest were 
viewed by more than 520,000 persons. 

Motion picture films are being produced to show current power-station 
construction work, special emphasis being given to the Nuclear Power Demonstra- 
tion, Douglas Point Nuclear Power, and Lakeview Generating Stations. These will 
figure prominently in the "Highlights of 1961" film which will be available to 
the public as a review of the year's activities. 

The finals in a province-wide public speaking contest for elementary and 
secondary school students will form part of the program at the Ontario Educational 
Association Convention in the spring of 1962. Jointly sponsored by the Commis- 
sion and the Ontario School Trustees' and Ratepayers' Association, the 1961-62 
contest attracted approximately 200,000 entrants. 

With the purpose of encouraging study in engineering, particularly in courses 
related to its own operations, the Commission in 1961 awarded a total of twelve 



56 The Coitimission^s Customers 

scholarships to promising students in Ontario universities, colleges, and technical 
institutes. 

That the professional competence of Ontario Hydro staff is widely recognized 
throughout the world is demonstrated in their participation by invitation in the 
deliberations of professional and technical societies. In addition it should be a 
matter of pride to all Canadians that Ontario Hydro, through Canada's participa- 
tion in the United Nations' efforts and in the Colombo Plan, has made available, 
or is making available the services of some of its most capable staff members on 
loan to such countries as Pakistan, Ghana, Lebanon, and Iran. The Commission is 
gratified to be able to record these efforts to foster good international relations. 

Electrical Inspection 

Under The Power Commission Act the issuance of regulations governing the 
installation of electric equipment and wiring, and the inspection and approval of 
the installations themselves are the responsibility of the Commission. Information 
supplementary to the published Regulations under the Act is disseminated through 
periodic issues of electrical inspection bulletins. 

Members of the staff responsible for this inspection type of work are closely 
associated with the activities of related authorities, with the purpose of co- 
ordinating Commission policy with that of such official bodies as the Canadian 
Standards Association Approvals Council, and the committees on the Canadian 
Electrical Codes Parts 1 and 2. All plans for high-voltage installations in commer- 
cial and industrial establishments are subject to review and report by Head Office 
inspectors before approval is given for installation work to proceed. 

During 1961 the Commission issued 306,912 permits for electrical installa- 
tions. In all, 656,212 inspections were made of work completed or in process. 
These statistics are generally regarded as some indication of the level of activity 
in the construction industry as a whole. 

Inspection reports indicate that the frequency of fires due to electrical 
causes rose again during 1961 for the third year in succession. It is apparent that 
continuous effort must be maintained if the general public is to be awakened to 
the danger of depending on inadequate or substandard wiring for the operation 
of the multiplicity of electrical appliances now in common use. Forty-one fires 
were attributed to electrical causes in 1961. 

Nineteen deaths were reported to be the results of incidents involving 
electricity. 

Rates Study 

The steady growth in the demand for electricity is accompanied by continuous 
change in the pattern of its application and use. The changing pattern requires 
unremitting study so that rate structures may result not only in revenue adequate 
for sound financial operation, but also in an equitable distribution of the costs of 
service among the customers supplied. Through the Rates Committee of the 
Association of Municipal Electrical Utilities, the municipalities also make their 



Rates Study 57 

contribution to these studies. Of special interest are the recent studies of the load 
characteristics of fast-recovery water-heaters, and of electric house-heating. These 
have led to improvements in the residential rate structure. During 1961 a complete 
review of rates for farm service was made, with the subsequent introduction of an 
improved rate structure applicable to all sizes of farms. A major project at present 
is the development, in conjunction with the AMEU Rates Committee, of simpler 
methods of allocating costs to the various types of customer services. 



SECTION IV 



PLANNING, ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 



One of the important developments in Ontario Hydro over the past 10 years 
has been the gradual extension of interconnection arrangements with power 
systems in Quebec, Manitoba, and the neighbouring states of Michigan and New 
York. This has followed the pattern of a similar process in the integration of the 
Commission's own power networks to which reference is made in the Foreword. 



Summary of the Power Development Program 
as at December 31, 1961 



Number of Units 
System and Development In Service Scheduled Capacity* 

kw 
SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

Nuclear Power Demonstration — nearDes JoachimsGS IT 1962 20,0001' 

Lakeview— near Toronto IT 1961 300,000t 

5T 1962—1966 l,500,000t 
Douglas Point Nuclear Power — near Kincardine IT 1965 200,000t 

NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES 
Northeastern Division 

Otter Rapids— Abitibi River 2H 1961 2H 1963 172,000 

Little Long— Mattagami River 2H 1963 114,000 

Harmon— Mattagami River 2H 1965 110,000 

Kipling— Mattagami River 2H 1966 132,000 

Northwestern Division 

Thunder Bay— Fort William IT 1962 100,000 1 

*Capacities quoted are dependable at time of system peak except those marked f. which are 
installed capacities. 

T indicates Thermal-electric 
H indicates Hydro-electric 

58 



The Power Development Program 



59 



For some months before the tie-line between the Northeastern Division and 
the Southern Ontario System was estabhshed in 1950, the Commission was oper- 
ating at Kirkland Lake Transformer Station an interconnection that crossed the 
boundary of the Province of Quebec. The Commission, having in prior years sup- 
pHed power to a private utiUty in the neighbouring province, used the interconnec- 
tion arrangement and the facihties of the private utiHty to purchase power from 
the adjacent system of the Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission. Since the late 1920s 
it has had major electrical connections for the purchase of power from Quebec 
suppliers for use in southern Ontario. In addition, the Commission had facilities 
for the export of power to the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation at Cornwall 
and at Niagara Falls, the former also making use of the intermediate facilities of a 
private utility. The interconnections established for the most part during the past 
decade, however, permit great flexibility in the interchange of power across provin- 
cial and international boundaries. They were made possible by the recently com- 
pleted program of frequency standardization in Ontario, and were in part the basis 
for proceeding with that program. 

The benefits of interconnection, which are normally shared equally by the 
participating utilities, stem from reciprocal arrangements for the delivery of power. 
In the early days of operating the major interconnections developed during the 
1950s, and indeed up until recently, the Commission was able to dispose of large 
quantities of surplus hydro-electric power to neighbouring utilities at prices that 
were attractive to them as their resources were mainly thermal-electric. Now that 
as much as 23 per cent of the Commission's generating capacity is thermal-electric, 
this aspect of its operation is declining in importance. It is, however, still important 
that one of two interconnected systems can purchase power from the other at any 
time when to do so is more economical than starting up its own idle thermal-electric 
units. In emergencies also each participant in the interconnection has the benefit 
of the added security resulting when reserves of power on two or more systems 



Expenditures on Capital Construction 1952 - 1961 





Genera- 
tion 


Transfor- 
mation 


Trans- 
mission 


Rural 


Other 


Total 


1952 ... 


$'000 
96,682 

117,311 
76,649 
68,483 

128,245 

151,738 

126,204 

98,251 

82,506 

77,939 


s$'000 
22,954 
21,711 
15,360 
12,624 
13,464 

17,302 
20,688 
20,788 
16,624 
10,693 


$'000 
15,628 
15,444 
16,091 
10,823 
11,424 

19,295 
20,806 
12,159 
12,230 
11,446 


$'000 
23,033 
24,402 
20,133 
18,961 
17,244 

17,347 
19,556 
19,542 
17,687 
18,425 


$'000 
4,534 
4,767 
4,585 
3,681 
2,626 

3,010 
3,402 
3,364 
2,992 
5,153 


S'OOO 
162,831 


1953 


183,635 


1954. 


132,818 


1955 


114,572 


1956. . 


173,003 


1957 


208,692 


1958.. 


190,656 


1959 


154,104 


1960 . . 


132,039 


1961 . 


123,656 






Total 


1,024,008 


172,208 


145,346 


196,330 


38,114 


1,576,006 







60 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

become a common pool upon which to draw as the need may arise. Another ad- 
vantage is the possibiUty of co-ordinating maintenance schedules of the inter- 
connected utilities to make the most economical use of combined reserves on the 
systems. 

In 1953, two interconnections were established by the Commission with the 
Detroit Edison Company in the state of Michigan. These two interconnections 
terminating at J. Clark Keith Transformer Station in Windsor, and at Sarnia 
Transformer Station have a combined capacity of 300,000 kva. In 1955 the 25- 
cycle facilities already in service for the delivery of power to the Niagara Mohawk 
Power Corporation in the Niagara Falls area were supplemented by the placing in 
service of a 60-cycle interconnection of 400,000-kva capacity at Sir Adam Beck- 
Niagara Generating Station No. 2. In 1960 one of the earlier 25-cycle lines to the 
Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation was modified for use as an interconnection by 
the installation of a 75,000-kva, 25-cycle regulating transformer at Niagara Parks 
Transformer Station located near Sir Adam Beck-Niagara Generating Station No. 1. 
Two interconnections have been established with the Power Authority of the State 
of New York, one of 300,000-kva capacity at St. Lawrence Transformer Station in 
1958, and one of 400,000-kva capacity at Sir Adam Beck-Niagara Generating 
Station No. 2 in 1961. In fact, the combined Southern Ontario System and North- 
eastern Division with a peak generating capacity of 5.5 million kilowatts is now 
interconnected with utilities in Quebec, Michigan, and the northeastern United 
States, a power network with a total capacity of approximately 36 million kilowatts. 

Two other tie-lines complete the list of the Commission's electrical connections 
across provincial and international boundaries. These are the 75,000-kva inter- 
connection with the Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board at Kenora Transformer Station, 
placed in service in 1956, and the facilities at Fort Frances which, by connecting 
the Commission's Northwestern Division through the facilities of the Ontario- 
Minnesota Paper Company with the parent company in the United States, permit 
the Commission to export surplus power to International Falls, Minnesota. 

During 1961 the Commission brought into service 500,000 kilowatts of in- 
stalled capacity in two thermal-electric units in the Toronto area, and 108,000 
kilowatts of dependable peak capacity in three hydro-electric units in the North- 
eastern Division. 

Extensive engineering investigations have been carried out with respect to a 
number of potential sites located on the English, Montreal, Abitibi, Mississagi, 
and White Rivers. 

Studies have also been carried out for the development of pumped-storage 
installations which, like the pumping-generating station near Niagara Falls, will 
permit the conversion of off-peak power into valuable peak capacity for the system. 
One such installation at present under consideration would be capable of delivering 
more than a million kilowatts over the period of peak demand in the Southern 
Ontario System. 



Interconnections with Neighbouring Utilities 



61 



During 1961 the Commission was engaged in the planning and construction 
of five hydraulic generating stations, in the construction of two conventional ther- 
mal-electric stations, and the extension of a third. The five hydro-electric stations 
were Red Rock Falls Generating Station on the Mississagi River, Otter Rapids 
Generating Station on the Abitibi River, and the Little Long, Harmon, and 
Kipling developments on the Mattagami River. The thermal-electric stations were 
Lakeview and Thunder Bay Generating Stations, and the recently completed ex- 
tension of Richard L. Hearn Generating Station. Two nuclear power stations at 
present under construction are also regarded as part of the current program. They 
are the 20,000-kw Nuclear Power Demonstration station now nearing completion 
on the Ottawa River at Rolphton, Ontario, and the 200,000-kw Douglas Point 
Nuclear Power Station being built on the shore of Lake Huron between Kincardine 
and Port Elgin. Both are being built for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, but the 
power produced will be supplied to the Commission's Southern Ontario System. 

All the hydraulic generating stations now under construction are located in the 
Northeastern Region. As increasing amounts of power become available from 
Otter Rapids Generating Station, and from the three Mattagami River develop- 
ments, it will be pooled at a 230-kv transformer station near Abitibi Canyon 
Generating Station. A transmission line of 460-kv construction is being built from 
Abitibi Canyon to a point near Sudbury, and it is to be operated at 230 kv until 
1965, at which time it will be changed to 460-kv operation. From Sudbury, a line, 




L 




I 



DOUGLAS POINT NUCLEAR POWER STATION — On the shore of Lake Huron between Kincardine and 
Port Elgin the concrete shell of the reactor building dominates the construction site. The dousing tank, 
already in position, can be seen rising above the wall level in the middle of the interior. In the fore- 
ground, excavation of the cooling water intake is proceeding behind the cofferdam. 



62 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



again of 460-kv construction, will be built to carry the power some 200 miles south 
to Toronto. It will be completed as far as Barrie in 1965 and operated at 230 
kilovolts. When it is eventually extended to Toronto, the voltage will be increased 
to 460 kv. 

Office and Service Buildings 

Two major projects under construction during 1961 were the research labor- 
atory at A. W. Manby Service Centre, and the new headquarters for the Central 
Region in Willowdale, just north of Toronto. Strikes in various building trades were 
responsible for some inconvenience and delay in both these operations. The re- 
search laboratory, however, was placed in service in September 1961. It is to be 
known as the Ontario Hydro W. P. Dobson Research Laboratory in honour of Dr. 
Dobson, who was the guiding force in the development of the Commission's re- 
search activities over a period of more than 40 years. The Central Regional Office is 
scheduled for service in August 1962. 

Electric heating and air conditioning are features of both buildings, the re- 
search laboratory incorporating the Commission's first use of heating by the dis- 
tribution of water from electrically heated boilers. In the laboratory special environ- 
mental rooms were designed to provide constant, variable, and moist fog conditions 
within closely specified limits and under variable conditions of temperature and 
humidity over temperatures ranging from — 20 to 130 degrees Fahrenheit. 



Total Mileage of Transmission Lines and Circuits 





Line route or 


Circuit 




structure miles 


mi 


les 


Voltage and Structure 


At Dec. 31, 


At Dec. 31, 


At Dec. 31, 


At Dec. 31, 




1960 


1961 


1960 


1961 


Southern Ontario System 










230,000-volt steel tower 


2,940.46 


3,059.48 


3,783.41 


4,021.45 


230,000-volt underground cable 




0.42 




0.84 


115,000-volt steel tower 


1,515.62 


1,506.35 


2,390.44 


2,376.04 


115,000-voIt wood pole 


953.20 


958.17 


957.81 


962.78 


115,000-volt underground cable 


27.22 


27.37 


59.98 


60.28 


60,000- volt steel tower 


11.17 


11.20 


12.30 


12.33 


60,000-volt wood pole 


3.31 


3.31 


3.31 


3.31 


44,000-volt and less. wood and steel . . . 


4,836.24 


4,804.28 


5,330.81 


5,278.30 


Total — Southern Ontario System . . . 


10,287.22 


10,370.58 


12,538.06 


12,715.33 


Northern Ontario Properties 










230,000-volt steel tower 


55.28 


55.21 


55.28 


55.21 


230,000-volt wood pole 


251.80 


252.01 


251.80 


252.01 


115,000-volt steel tower 


894.75 


895.93 


1,532.33 


1,534.68 


115,000-volt wood pole 


1,472.65 


1,471.10 


1,472.65 


1,471.10 


69,000- volt wood pole 


203.72 


203.72 


203.72 


203.72 


44,000-volt and less. wood pole 


1,708.79 


1,674.81 


1,777.03 


1,738.54 


Total — Northern Ontario Properties. 


4,586.99 


4,552.78 


5,292.81 


5,255.26 


Total — All systems ... . 


14,874.21 


14,923.36 


17,830.87 


17,970.59 







Progress on Power Developments — Southern Ontario System 63 

Additional buildings were erected at Abitibi Canyon Generating Station to 
accommodate operating staff from the new generating stations in the surrounding 
area, as well as personnel engaged on the extra-high-voltage transmission project. A 
two-room addition was completed for the school-house at Cameron Falls Generating 
Station. 



Survey Work 

Topographic and location surveys were carried out along 215 miles of new 
major transmission and subtransmission lines, and at a number of generating station 
projects. The use of helicopters both for the transportation of personnel and for 
delivery of material and equipment was a valuable time saver in these operations. 

At Head Office, stereoplotting was used to produce topographic plans for a 
total of more than 190,000 acres in connection with hydraulic project developments, 
and to supply planimetric detail for a further total of 2,400 acres extending 1 ,500 
feet on either side of the centre line of the proposed route for the northern extra- 
high-voltage transmission line, south from Sudbury. 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

Progress on Power Developments 

In addition to construction work on four major power developments, excava- 
tion of the tailrace area at Robert H. Saunders-St. Lawrence Generating Station 
was carried forward to completion in 1961. The Commission also carried out 
extensive rehabilitation of the concrete power dam at Eugenia Generating Station 
in order to restore the Eugenia Lake headpond to its former level as required by the 
Department of Lands and Forests of the Provincial Government. The appropriate 
method of sharing the cost is yet to be established. 

With the increasing use by the Power Authority of the State of New York of 
water available for power production at Niagara Falls, the 13-gate control structure 
in the river up stream is no longer considered adequate for maintaining the re- 
quired level in the Chippawa-Grass Island pool under the conditions expected to 
prevail in and after 1962. Following approval by the International Joint Commis- 
sion, a program was begun to extend the present structure by 5 additional gates, 
each 100 feet in width. 

An upstream cofferdam was built and a downstream cofferdam was partly 
constructed in 1961. Part of the submerged rock weir, placed during the years 1942 
to 1946, was removed. Training walls extending approximately 1,700 feet up 
stream and 2,000 feet down stream from the control dam on the Canadian shore 
were almost finished by the end of the year. The walls will facilitate the movement 
of ice in the upper river and prevent ice concentration at the main Canadian 
intakes. The control-structure project is scheduled for completion in the summer 
of 1963. 



64 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



Lakeview Generating Station — Near Toronto 



Location 

Installed Capacity 
In Service 
In-service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— On Lake Ontario just west of Toronto. 
— 1,800,000 kilowatts in 6 units, 60 cycles. 
—Unit 1 on October 30,1961. 
— One unit in each year 1962 to 1966, inclusive. 
— $217,000,000, including generation, step-up transfor- 
mation, and high-voltage switching at the site. 



The installation of Unit 1 was completed, and the turbo-generator was first 
synchronized with the system on October 30, 1961. Work continued to the end of 
the year on commissioning tests, correction of defects, and necessary modifications 
to prepare the unit for commercial operation. The maximum net output during 
this period was 150,000 kilowatts. 

Engineering and construction of the boiler and auxiliaries for Unit 2 were 
nearly finished by the end of 1961. The turbo-generator is expected to be ready 
for preliminary run, and for commissioning tests in the early summer of 1962. The 
building structure for Units 3 and 4 was begun, and steel erection is under way. 
The major equipment for these units has been ordered, and manufacturing of the 
boilers and turbo-generators is proceeding. 

Towards the end of the year the contract for the turbo-generators for Units 5 
and 6 was awarded. 



Richard L. Hearn Generating Station — Toronto 



Location 
Installed Capacity 

In Service 
Estimated Cost 



— Eastern area of the Toronto waterfront. 
—1,200,000 kilowatts, 60 cycles (400,000 kilowatts in 

4 units, and 800,000 kilowatts in 4 units). 
—Unit 1 in 1951; Units 2 and 3 in 1952; Unit 4 in 

1953; Unit 5 in 1959; Units 6 and 7 in 1960; Unit 8 

in 1961. 
— $99,321,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 



( Units 5, 6, 7, and 8 only) tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

With the placing in service of Unit 8 on March 22, 1961, the program of 
construction at the station was virtually complete. 



Nuclear Power Demonstration — Ottawa River 



Location 

Installed Capacity 
In-service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— About 2 miles down stream from Des Joachims Gener- 
ating Station on the Ottawa River at Rolphton, Ontario. 

— 20,000 kilowatts in 1 unit, 60 cycles. 

— 1962. 

—$33,000,000, to be shared by the Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission of Ontario, Atomic Energy of 
Canada Limhed, and Canadian General Electric Com- 
pany Limited. 



Thermal-electric ami Nuclear-electric Stations 



65 



Erection of the turbo-generator unit was completed and the unit was made 
ready for operation when the reactor-boiler is placed in service for raising steam. 
Instrumentation and controls for all the conventional equipment were finished, and 
most of the calibration was complete. Normal station services were for the most 
part in operation. Meanwhile, finishing work such as road paving, landscaping, and 
the painting of equipment and interiors of buildings, both in the powerhouse and 
pumphouse, were carried out. 



Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station 



Location 

Installed Capacity 
In-service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— On the shore of Lake Huron between Kincardine and 

Port Elgin. 
— 200,000 kilowatts in 1 unit, 60 cycles. 
—1965. 
—$81,500,000. 



The Commission makes the services of its organization available to Atomic 
Energy of Canada Limited at cost in order to assist in the design and construction 
of this, the first full-scale nuclear power development in Canada. After the dousing 
tank has been installed, and the dome of the roof was erected in October 1961, 
the reactor building took on an external appearance of relative completion. 




DOUGLAS POINT NUCLEAR POWER STATION — These two photographs of the reactor building for 
the first large-scale nuclear power station in Canada show, at the left, a section of the reactor building 
dome being hoisted into position by a derrick situated within the building itself, and at the right, the 
dome completed. While the erection of the dome in October 1961 gave the reactor building itself an 
external appearance of relative completion, the major part of construction at this complex project, and 
much of the other design work being carried out by the Commission and Atomic Energy of Canada 

Limited still remain to be completed. 



66 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

Actually, the major part of the construction work at this complex project remains 
to be done. 

Paving of the 6 miles of road linking the station site with Highway 21 north 
of Kincardine was completed during the summer of 1961. 

Transformer Stations 

In order to supply increasing loads and to provide improved service security, 
substantial installations of new transformer capacity were in progress at a number 
of points throughout the Southern Ontario System during 1961. In addition to 
installations to increase the capacity of stations already in service, four new 
stations were completed during the year and engineering or construction was in 
progress for a number of others. 

Stations in the Western, West Central, and Niagara Regions 

New transformer capacity, adequate to meet the expected growth of loads in 
the Windsor area for a number of years, was provided by the installation of two 
83,333-kva, 115 — 27.6-kv transformers at Windsor-Crawford Transformer Station. 

In the Niagara Region, two new 115 — 27.6-kv transformer stations were 
placed in service during 1961. One, located near Elmira, relieves the load on 
Guelph Transformer Station, and provides improved service security to Elmira, 
Fergus, and Elora. It has a capacity of 27,000-kva at present, includes provision 
for an ultimate installation of two 41,666-kva transformers, and is controlled from 
Detweiler Transformer Station. The other, with an installation of two 83,333-kva, 
115 — 27.6-kv transformers, was constructed on the site of the original 115 — 13.8- 
kv Dundas Transformer Station. The loads of the Dundas Public Utilities Com- 
mission and of an industrial customer have been converted to supply at 27.6 kv, 
and the equipment of the original station has been removed. 

In the Hamilton area, a program to increase the capacity of Hamilton-Gage 
Transformer Station was completed in 1961 with the installation of a fourth 56,000- 
kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformer. The station supplies most of the loads of heavy 
industry in the city. At Hamilton-Mohawk Transformer Station, which supplies 
loads in the southern part of the city, two 66,666-kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformers 
were installed to replace the two 33,333-kva transformers previously in service. A 
site has been purchased east of the city, and engineering design is under way for a 
new station to be known as Hamilton-Lake Transformer Station. The station is 
expected to be ready for service by the fall of 1963. 

At Brantford Transformer Station, two 83,333-kva, 115 — 27.6-kv transform- 
ers were installed to replace the two smaller transformers previously in service, and 
the temporary 60-cycle station, which had been constructed to meet the require- 
ments of the frequency standardization program, was dismantled. With its increased 
capacity, the station will carry a greater share of the loads of Brantford and the 
surrounding district, which are also supplied from Brant Transformer Station. At St. 
Thomas Transformer Station, two 31,000-kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformers were 
installed, and two of the three 15,000-kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformers previously 
in use were reconnected for 27.6-kv operation. Equipment was installed also to 
permit supervisory control of the station from E. V. Buchanan Transformer Station. 



Transformer Stations — Southern Ontario System 

Stations in the Central Region 



67 



In the Central Region, four new transformer stations were under construction 
during 1961. Two of these, one at present, and one eventually to be on the 230-kv 
network, were completed and placed in service before the end of the year. 

Cooksville Transformer Station, with an initial installation of two 83,333-kva, 
230 — 27.6-kv transformers and provision for the later addition of four similar 
units, was placed in service in December. It supplies the rapidly increasing load in 
the Toronto Township area, relieving the load on A. W. Manby Transformer 

Station. At Buttonville Trans- 
former Station, which was 
placed in service in October, 
the initial installation consists 
of two 83,333-kva, 115—27.6 
kv transformers. Eventually 
the station will be converted to 
supply at 230-kv, and two ad- 
ditional transformers will be 
installed. The station supplies 
loads in Richmond Hill, Mark- 
ham, Stouffville and their en- 
virons, relieving loads at Scar- 
borough and Toronto-Bathurst 
Transformer Stations. It is 
operated by remote control 
from Scarborough Trans- 
former Station. 

Construction continues at 
Toronto-Sheppard and Toron- 
to-Runnymede Transformer 
Stations, both scheduled for 
service in 1962. Two 80,000- 
kva, 115 — 13.8 -kv trans- 
formers were installed during 
1961 at Toronto - Teraulay 
Transformer Station. The in- 
crease in the capacity of the 




LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION — In the foreground is 
one of the 200-hp electric motors used to operate the coal 
pulverizers shown immediately behind. When the pulverizers 
have reduced the granular coal to the consistency of fine 
talcum powder, it is blown with preheated air into the boiler 
combustion chamber. The six pulverizers associated with each 
300,0C0-kw unit can grind coal of an aggregate weight of 
1 1 tons per hour. 



Station was made necessary by 
the rapidly increasing summer peak load in downtown Toronto, largely the result of 
the installation of air-conditioners. 



At A. W. Manby Transformer Station, the installation of two 83,333-kva, 
230 — 27.6-kv transformers is proceeding. Increased 27.6-kv capacity at the station 
is required to meet expanding loads in the area, and to relieve the load on Richview 
Transformer Station. Terminal facilities, which included six 20,000,000-kva circuit- 
breakers, were installed at the station for two new 230-kv circuits over which power 
generated by the first two units at Lakeview Generating Station will be received. As 



68 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

part of a continuing program to make provision for the increasing 230-kv short- 
circuit interrupting requirements in the Toronto area as units are placed in 
service at Lakeview Generating Station, six 20,000,000-kva circuit-breakers were 
installed at Richview Transformer Station, and three 15,000,000-kva circuit-break- 
ers were installed at Cherry wood Switching Station to replace smaller units. 

Two new transformer stations are to be constructed to meet increasmg require- 
ments from industrial and residential development near Bronte and in the north- 
eastern sector of North York Township. Engineering is in progress for the initial 
installation of two 83,333-kva, 115 — 27.6-kv transformers at Bronte Transformer 
Station, and of two 125,000-kva, 230 — 27.6 — 13.8-kv transformers at Toronto- 
Leslie Transformer Station. The latter is planned for an ultimate eight units of 
corresponding capacity, and the Bronte station eventually for six 125,000-kva, 
230 — 27.6-kv units. 

Stations in the Georgian Bay Region 

New 230-kv facilities have been installed at Hanover Transformer Station in 
order to reinforce the 115-kv system and to supply increasing loads in the Palmers- 
ton, Hanover, and Owen Sound areas. The new faciUties include an initial installa- 
tion of two 115,000-kva, 230 — 115-kv autotransformers, and provision for an 
ultimate installation of four 225,000-kva, 230 — 115-kv autotransformers, and 
terminal facilities for eight 230-kv circuits. Eventually, power from Douglas Point 
Nuclear Power Station will be supplied to the 230-kv system at Hanover Trans- 
former Station. At present, 230-kv power reaches the station over a new double- 
circuit transmission line tapped into the 230-kv circuits between Detweiler and 
Essa Transformer Stations at a point near Orangeville. 

Construction is under way at Barrie Transformer Station for the installation 
of two 83,333-kva, 115 — 44-kv, three-phase transformers to replace the two banks 
of three 7,000-kva, single-phase transformers now in service at the station. In 
order to provide increased service security, a second 115-kv transmission line is 
being constructed from Essa Transformer Station, and switching is being installed 
so that each of the new transformers can be operated independently and supplied 
by either of the two lines from Essa Transformer Station. The new facilities will 
be ready for service in 1962. 

Stations in the East Central and Eastern Regions 

In order to meet increasing requirements for power in the Ottawa area, new 
installations were completed during 1961 at Ottawa-National Research, and Ot- 
tawa-Slater Transformer Stations, the latter involving the installation of a 66,666- 
kva, 1 15 — 12-kv transformer which doubled the capacity of the station. Additional 
transformer capacity will be provided at Ottawa-Overbrook Transformer Station, 
where construction is under way for the installation of a 66,666-kva, 115 — 12-kv 
transformer with double secondary windings. At Chalk River Transformer Station, 
additional capacity to supply the load of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was 
provided by the installation of a 25,000-kva, 115 — 2.4-kv transformer. 

At Frontenac Transformer Station, which supplies loads in the Kingston area, 
the capacity of each of the three 115 — 44-kv transformer banks was increased from 
21,000 to 25,000 kva by the installation of additional forced-air cooling. 



Transmission Lines — Southern Ontario System 



69 



Further capacity to meet growing loads in the area will be provided by the 
construction of a new 115 — 44-kv transformer station west of Kingston. Engineering 
design is now proceedmg, and the initial installation of one 83,333-kva transformer 
is expected to be ready for service in 1963. At Smiths Falls Transformer Station, 
one of the oldest in the eastern part of the province, station facilities will be re- 
habilitated and two additional banks of transformers, similar to the 21,000-kva, 
115 — 44-kv bank now in service, will be installed. The additional banks will be 
moved from Barrie Transformer Station, and they are expected to be ready for 
service by the fall of 1962. 

Operation with the international interconnections closed at Cornwall and at 
Niagara Falls normally results in a flow of power from Ontario to New York State 
at Cornwall, and from New York State to Ontario at Niagara Falls. As the units at 
the new generating station of the Power Authority of the State of New York at 
Niagara Falls are placed in service, the flow of circulating power will increase, and 
under certain conditions of generation and load it will overload transmission and 
interconnection facilities, making it necessary to open the interconnection at Corn- 
wall. In order to provide a means of regulating the flow of power over the inter- 
connection, a 300,000-kva, 230-kv, phase-shifting transformer will be installed at 
St. Lawrence Transformer Sta- 
tion. This will make it possible 
for the interconnection to be 
kept closed, thus permitting 

transmission facilities both in t^~^ 

Ontario and in New York r-^.^^-. "1! 

State to be used more effec- 
tively. The cost of the trans- 
former, which will be larger 
than any unit of the kind 
known to be in use, will be 
shared equally by the Commis- 
sion and the Power Authority. 

Transmission Lines 

The 230-kv facilities to 
transmit the output from the 
first two units at Lakeview 
Generating Station to A. W. 
Manby Transformer Station 
were completed in July 1961. 
They consist of two under- 
ground circuits with a route 
length of slightly less than 
one-half mile, and approxi- 
mately five and one-half 
miles of overhead 
double-circuit transmission line. The underground circuits pass under the Queen 
Elizabeth Way and a shopping centre. They mark the first use by the Commission 




CORONAPHONE — This easily portable unit, consisting of a 
highly sensitive microphone combined with a directional re- 
flector, was developed for the accurate location of the sources 
of corona on high-voltage transmission lines. It can be 
operated in the field by one man. 



70 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



of directly buried cable for the transmission of power at 230 kv. Each of the six 
cables has a copper conductor of 2,750,000 circular mils in cross-sectional area. 

They are oil-filled, lead- 
sheathed, and have an outside 
diameter of four inches. These 
are the largest yet to be in- 
stalled on the Commission's 
systems. The overhead circuits 
are carried on bridge-type 
transmission towers. On these 
towers two transmission cir- 
cuits are suspended from three 
crossarm girders supported by 
two vertical shafts. The struc- 
tures will be extended when 
necessary by the addition of 
three girders and one vertical 
shaft for each additional pair 
of circuits. The towers on the 
Lakeview Generating Station 
to A. W. Manby Transformer 
Station line will eventually be 
extended to carry six or eight 
circuits. While it is more cost- 
ly to construct, the bridge-type 
tower is economical for use 
where land costs are high, as 
it permits a closer horizontal 
spacing between circuits than 
is possible with the conventional centre-shaft tower. 




STRINGING CONDUCTORS ON BRIDGE-TYPE TOWERS — A 
conductor is being pulled into position on the 230-kv line from 
Lakeview Generating Station to A. W. Manby Transformer 
Station. The bridge-type towers, recently introduced for use 
by the Commission, permit a closer horizontal spacing of con- 
ductors than is possible with the conventional centre-shaft 
tower. The design will permit extension to carry additional 
circuits when required. These features make the bridge-type 
towers particularly suitable for use in built-up areas where 
wide rights of way are not easily obtainable. 



Construction was completed in December 1961 for a 230-kv double-circuit 
transmission line, 48 miles in length, between Hanover Transformer Station and a 
point near Orangeville on the Essa Transformer Station to Detweiler Transformer 
Station line. The line supplies power to the new 230 — 115-kv facilities at Hanover 
Transformer Station. Eventually it will form part of the circuits over which power 
from the Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station will be delivered to the Commis- 
sion's transmission network. 



The line was designed with a view to reducing the chance of a serious 
interruption of service occurring as the result of sleet and ice conditions. The two 
overhead ground cables are supported, one at the tower peak and the other 
directly below it at the middle crossarm. As compared with the standard arrange- 
ment used on older transmission lines, this new arrangement of ground cables will 
provide greater lateral clearance between the conductor phases and ground cables 
sagging under the weight of ice. The design of the towers also provides for the 
possible eventual insulation of the ground cables. This would permit electric 
currents to be passed through the cables in order to melt ice formations. 



Progress on Power Developments — ISorthern Ontario Properties 



71 



Engineering design and surveying are in progress for an extra-high-voltage 
transmission line to be constructed between Essa Transformer Station and Hanmer 
Transformer Station. To be completed by 1965, the line will be operated initially 
at 230 kv with a connection to R. H. Martindale Transformer Station. 
Eventually, it will form part of the extra-high-voltage system over which power 
generated at stations in the James Bay watershed will be transmitted at 460 kv to 
the Toronto area. 

NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES 

Progress on Power Developments 

Brief progress reports are given in the following paragraphs on construction at 
Thunder Bay Generating Station in Fort William, at Red Rock Falls Generating 
Station on the Mississagi River, and at Little Long, Harmon, and Kipling Gener- 
ating Stations on the Mattagami River. A more complete report is given for Otter 
Rapids Generating Station, which was placed in service in September 1961. 



Thunder Bay Generating Station — Fort William 



Location 

Installed Capacity 
In-service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— North shore of the Mission River in Fort William. 
— 100,000 kilowatts in 1 unit, 60 cycles. 
—1962. 

— $25,250,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 
tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 




THUNDER BAY GENERATING STATION — The installation of this 100,000-kw unit was nearly complete 
at the end of 1961. It will be given its initial run for test purposes in April 1962. 



72 



Plantiiug, Engineering^ and Construction 



The buildings were completed in 1961. By the end of the year all of the 
equipment had been installed, and preliminary runs had been made on most of 
the pumps, motors, and fans. The coal-handling system was completed and used 
for unloading and stockpiling the coal required for the test runs. 

Testing of the boiler and turbine was scheduled for early in 1962. 



Red Rock Falls Generating Station — Mississagi River 



Location 

Dependable Peak 

Capacity 
Rated Head 
In Service 
Actual Cost at 

December 31 , 1961 



— 14 miles northeast of Thessalon, and 15 miles down 
stream from George W. Rayner Generating Station. 

— 40,000 kilowatts in 2 units, 60 cycles. 

—93 feet. 

—Unit 1 in 1960; Unit 2 in 1961. 

— ^$16,831,000 including generation, step-up transforma- 
tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 



Unit 2 was placed in service on January 13, 1961 to complete the station. 




1 




CONSTRUCTION FOR LITTLE LONG GENERATING STATION — In the diversion section area, a gravity 
structure to include two temporary diversion ports and five temporary sluices was built behind the 
protection of the cofferdam keeping out the rushing waters of the Mattogami River. Following the com- 
pletion of this section, the open ports and sluices will carry the flow in the river while the channel 
in the foreground is cofferdammed to permit construction of part of the dam linking the sluiceway struc- 
ture with the powerhouse en the right bank of the river some 200 yards to the east. 



Little Long Generating Station 



73 



Little Long Generating Station — Mattagami River 



Location 



-About 42 miles north of Kapuskasing, and 4 miles up 
stream from Smoky Falls. 



Dependable Peak 

Capacity 
Rated Head 
In-service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— 114,000 kilowatts in 2 units, 60 cycles. 
—90 feet. 

— The autumn of 1963. 

— $50,000,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 
tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 
Access and construction roads were completed. A route has been established 
for the 27-mile service road from Abitibi Canyon Generating Station to Little Long 
Generating Station. Construction will begin in 1962. 

Over 20 per cent of the headpond area had been cleared by the end of 1961, 
and excavation had been started for the foundations of the headworks and power- 
house, and for the tailrace channel. Foundation excavation for the sluiceway part 
of the river section had begun, and concreting of the west gravity wall was almost 
complete. 

At the Adam Creek control dam concreting was finished for the sluiceway 
section, for the west gravity section, and for the downstream apron. Concreting of 
the east gravity section was almost complete. Approximately 70 per cent of the 
western section of the dike was constructed. 




ADAM CREEK CONTROL DAM AT LITTLE LONG GENERATING STATION — This eight-sluice concrete 
structure, here shown in seeming isolation in northern Ontario muskeg, will be an important element 
in reducing construction costs at the three new Mattagami River power developments. Joined to the 
Little Long Generating Station powerhouse structure by 1.5 miles of earth dike, the control structure 
will channel flood waters into Adam Creek to bypass all three stations and flow into the Mattagami 
River down stream from Kipling Generating Station. The Commission thus avoided the necessity of 
building extensive control structures at each of the power developments, and the provision in the 
construction procedures Tor flood-water control. 



74 



Planning^ Engineering, and Construction 




POWER DEVELOPMENT AT LITTLE LONG RAPIDS — The four-cubic-yard bucket shown in the picture 
is placing concrete for the gravity-dam section on the right bank of the Mattagami River. Because ihe 
immediately surrounding area is predominantly low-lying muskeg, a total of 5 y2 miles of dikes is 
required to contain the head pond. They will have a maximum height of 60 feet, and wiil require the 
placing of about 3.5 million cubic yards of earth fill. 



The importance of this structure may be gauged by the potential savings 
which it makes possible in the total construction costs of the three new Mattagami 
River developments. Adam Creek has its inauspicious start near the Mattagami 
River about a mile up stream from Little Long Rapids and joins the river 20 miles 
down stream, north of the site of Kipling Generating Station. Early in the planning 
stages for these stations it was recognized that after the creation of the headpond 
at Litde Long Generating Station, Adam Creek would provide a natural diversion 
channel for carrying unusually heavy flows which may occur as flash floods or at 
the time of the spring freshet. In the absence of control dams up stream, control 
of these excess flows via Adam Creek will enable the Commission to achieve 
estimated economies of up to $13,000,000 in reduced sluiceway construction and 
cofferdam costs at the generating station sites. 



Harmon Generating Station (Dependable peak capacity 110,000 kilowatts 

in 2 units — estimated cost $29,500,000). 
and 

Kipling Generating Station (Dependable peak capacity 132,000 kilowatts 

in 2 units — estimated cost $31,300,000). 

These two stations will be located on the Mattagami River down stream 
from Smoky Falls. They are scheduled for service in 1965 and 1966 respectively. 



Otter Rapids Generating Station 75 

During the year, clearing was begun for the 9-mile service road from Little 
Long Generating Station to the Harmon Generating Station site, and the route was 
established for an additional 3.5 miles of road to the site of Kipling Generating 
Station. 



Otter Rapids Generating Station — Abitibi River 

Location — 60 miles northeast of Kapuskasing, and 23 miles down 

stream from Abitibi Canyon Generating Station. 

Dependable Peak 

Capacity — 172,000 kilowatts in 4 units, 60 cycles. 

Rated Head —107 feet. 

In Service — Unit 1 on September 26, and Unit 2 on October 24, 

1961. 

In-service Schedule — Two units in 1963. 

Estimated Cost — $35,554,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 

tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

From its head at the western end of Lake Abitibi, the Abitibi River follows 
first a westward and then a northward course, with a total length of approximately 
350 miles and a total drop in elevation of 821 feet. It joins the Moose River at a 
point about 30 miles from the southwestern shore of James Bay. The watershed, 
located partly in the Ontario Districts of Cochrane, Temiskaming, and Sudbury, 
and partly in the Province of Quebec, covers a total area of 11,300 square miles. 

On the upstream half of the river, three generating stations owned by the 
Abitibi Power and Paper Company are located at Island Falls, Iroquois Falls, and 
Twin Falls. Abitibi Canyon Generating Station, the first Commission-owned station 
on the river, is located down stream from the three privately ov/ned stations at a 
point about two-thirds of the way between the source and the mouth of the river. 

In the years between 1945 and 1957, the Commission made a number of 
surveys and studies of the remaining potential power sites on the river. These 
studies indicated that three sites, Otter Rapids, Coral Rapids, and Lower Nine Mile 
Rapids were particularly suitable for development, and in December 1958 a 
decision was made to proceed with the construction of a generating station at 
Otter Rapids, 23 miles down stream from Abitibi Canyon Generating Station. 

Construction at the site was begun in 1959, and by the fall of 1961 the 
completion of the first stage of the development permitted the first two generating 
units to be placed in service. Another two units are scheduled for service in 1963. 
The necessary minimum provision is also being made for the possible later in- 
stallation of four more units. 

At Otter Rapids Generating Station, the Abitibi River carries the run-off from 
an area of 8,761 square miles. This area will be increased by 1,050 square miles 
when a project for the diversion of the Litde Abitibi River is completed in 1963. 
The Little Abitibi River drains the eastern part of the Abitibi River watershed, 



76 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



and joins the main stream approximately 30 miles down stream from Otter Rapids 
Generating Station. It is to be diverted into Newpost Creek, which flows into the 
Abitibi River about midway between Abitibi Canyon and Otter Rapids Generating 
Stations. The diversion will be accomplished by the construction of a control dam 
on the Little Abitibi River, and approximately two miles of canals. River-flow will 
thus be increased, not only at Otter Rapids Generating Station, but also at the 
potential power sites at Coral Rapids and Lower Nine Mile Rapids further 
down stream. 




POWERHOUSE 



7AILWATCR EL 293 FT 



OTTER RAPIDS GENERATING STATION — Detail of General Plan sketched on a background 
photograph of the development. 



General Description 

The power dam, an 1,800-foot-long concrete and earth-fill structure, was 
constructed near the foot of Otter Rapids. Because the river banks are high and 
steep, it was possible to contain the headpond, which extends 23 miles up stream 
to the tailrace of Abitibi Canyon Generating Station, without the construction of 
block dams or earth dikes. At an elevation of 401 feet the headpond covers an 
area of 2,320 acres. With a drawdown of 6 feet, it provides a storage capacity of 
13,450 acre-feet. 



The concrete section of the dam is approximately 1,100 feet long. It includes a 
conventional headworks structure for 8 generating units, ten 22-foot-wide sluice- 
ways, and a log-chute headblock. Earth-fill sections join each end of the concrete 
dam to the river banks. 



Otter Rapids Generating Station 77 

The ten sluicegates are each 32 feet 6 inches high. Two are motor-operated, 
and hoisting service for the other eight is provided by the headworks gantry-crane. 
With the headwater at an elevation of 401 feet and the sluicegate wide open, each 
sluiceway can pass a flow of 12,800 cfs. 

A concrete curtain wall prevents the flow of water through the log-chute 
headblock at present, but provision is included in the structure for the installation 
of a taintor-type gate and a log-chute if they are required in the future. 

The headworks is conventional in design, and consists of double inlet intakes 
for each of the eight units that eventually may be installed at the station. Headgates 
have been installed in the inlet openings of all eight intakes, and the intakes for 
Units 1 and 2 have been completed with the installation of trash-racks and individual 
electric hoists for raising and lowering the headgates. An electric gantry-type 
travelling crane provides hoisting service for the headworks and all other sections 
of the dam. 

Two steel penstocks, each 24 feet in diameter and encased in concrete, convey 
the flow to the scroll-cases for Units 1 and 2. Penstocks for Units 3 and 4 also have 
been installed. The scroll-cases are formed from rolled steel plates, which were 
welded into large segments before shipment to the site, where final assembly and 
welding were carried out. Welds made in the field were stress-relieved, and were 
X-rayed in order to detect subsurface cracks and foreign matter which might 
weaken the joints. Elbow-type draft-tubes carry the discharge from the scroll-cases 
to the tailrace. Hoisting service for the draft-tube service gates is provided by an 
outdoor electric hoist which runs on a rail suspended from extensions to the power- 
house superstructure frame. 

The generating-unit and erection-bay areas are enclosed by insulated alu- 
minum siding panels supported by a rigid steel frame 207 feet long and 67 feet 
wide. The roof deck consists of galvanized steel panels, insulated with fibreboard 
and covered with felt and gravel. Two 105-ton overhead service cranes run on 
rails which are supported 21 feet 10 inches above floor-level by the superstructure 
columns. Each crane is equipped with a 15-ton auxiliary hoist. 

The station will be operated for the most part as a peak-load plant. Under this 
arrangement the generating units will be operated at full gate for two hours on the 
average each day at the time of maximum demand on the system, using in this 
short time the major part of the water ponded during a 24-hour period under 
minimum-flow conditions at the station. It is estimated that during the two-hour 
period, under these conditions, the headpond level will fall one foot with two 
units running, and two feet with four units running. Under better than minimum- 
flow conditions the station could of course be operated at maximum output over 
longer periods of the day. 

Construction Procedure 

A large part of the power dam was constructed on dry land above the normal 
high-water level of the river. This included the headworks structure for Units 1 to 4, 
which was built on the west bank, the corresponding structure for Unit 7, which 
was built on an island, and the sluiceway structure on the east bank. 



78 



Planning^ Eugineeriiig, and Construction 



The small island which originally divided the river greatly facilitated dewater- 
ing of the site for the construction of the remaining parts of the dam. In the summer 
of 1959 cofferdams were built in the west channel. The substructure for the head- 
works of Units 5 and 6 was then constructed to a height adequate for normal river 
flooding. Four diversion ports were included in this section. During March and 
April 1960, the cofferdams were removed, and the spring freshet flowed through 
these diversion ports as well as through the east river channel. Cofferdams were 
then erected in the east channel, and while the headworks for Unit 8 and part of 
the gravity sections were constructed in the dewatered area between them, the full 
flow of the river passed through the diversion ports in the west channel section. 
The east channel cofferdams were removed in March 1961. In August 1961, 
when construction was nearing completion, gates were lowered in the diversion 
ports, the headpond was filled, and the ports were plugged with concrete. 

Precambrian bed-rock, composed chiefly of gneiss, forms the base for the 
foundations of the dam. Major faults in soft rock zones underlie each of the river 
channels at the site. Sound foundations were ensured, however, by careful excava- 
tion and pressure grouting in the fault zones. The river banks at the site are 
formed of layers of dense glacial soils with a total thickness of approximately 100 
feet. These soils were found to be suitable both as foundations and as construction 
material for the earth-fill sections of the dam. 




OTTER RAPIDS GENERATING STATION SITE — This picture, taken in 1958, shows the north end of the 

island dividing the Abitibi River into two channels at the Otter Rapids Generating Station site. The 

two channels and the island were effectively used in the construction procedure. They are barely 

recognizable in the picture on the opposite page. 



Otter Rapids Generating Station 



79 



Forest cover in the area consists of poplar, jack pine, balsam, spruce, and 
white birch. However, because of the height and steepness of the river banks, the 
area covered by water up stream from the dam did not increase greatly with 
flooding, and it was necessary to clear only 180 acres for the headpond. Sixty 
acres were cleared at the dam site. 

Access to the site was provided by the construction of two short roads. These 
lead from the main line of the Ontario Northland Railway, which passes within a 
mile of the station. 

Mechanical Equipment 

The turbines, two now in service, and two scheduled for service in the fall of 
1963, are products of Canadian Allis-Chalmers Limited. Each is rated at 60,000 
bhp, operating at 138.4 rpm, and with an estimated discharge flow of 5,700 cfs 
under normal operating conditions. They are of the fixed-blade propeller type, 
which, when compared with other types of turbine, has the advantages of simple 
design, less requirement for maintenance time and expense, and reduced costs for 
the associated generators. 

Prior to 1950, the fixed-blade propeller-type turbine was considered to be 
economical only for use in installations where the head was 66 feet or less. More 




OTTER RAPIDS GENERATING STATION — In July 1961, water was still flowing throi tour 

diversion ports as the station was in the final stages of the power dam construction. A large part of 
the structure was built on dry land above the normal river level, parts of the headworks on the left 
bank of the river and on the island, and the ten-sluice structure on the right bank. Subsequently the 
west and east channels were cofferdammed in turn to permit the completion of the headworks and 

bulkhead sections. 



80 



Plattuing^ Engineering, and Construction 




OTTER RAPIDS GENERATING STATION — Left: One of the fixed-blade propellers for the turbines is 
shown during assembly just prior to the addition of the nose cone. Each of the two turbines now in 
service is rated at 60,000 bhp. Recent improvement in design permits the use of this type of turbine 
at heads greatly in excess of 66 feet, a height formerly regarded as a maximum. Right: The generator- 
rotor for Unit 1 is shown during assembly in July 1961. Each of the 46,000-kva units may be operated 
either as a generator or as a synchronous condenser. 



recently, however, new designs have been developed for use at higher heads, and 
fixed-blade propeller-type turbines have been installed at Robert H. Saunders-St. 
Lawrence Generating Station, where the head is 81 feet, and at Red Rock Falls 
Generating Station, where the head is 93 feet. The success of these applications led 
to specifications for this type of turbine at Otter Rapids Generating Station, where 
the rated head is 107 feet. 

The turbines are provided with electro-hydraulic governors, a new type first 
used by the Commission at Red Rock Falls Generating Station. In contrast with the 
conventional mechanical type, the electro-hydraulic type of governor offers both 
ease of adjustment for optimum settings, and dependable joint control of several 
units or stations. 



Electrical Equipment 

For each of the four units now scheduled for service at Otter Rapids Generat- 
ing Station, a 13.8-kv, 3-phase, 60-cycle generator is being supplied by the Cana- 
dian General Electric Company Limited. Each generator, rated at 46,000 kva, 0.95 
power factor lagging, operates at 138.4 rpm. Each is equipped to operate either as a 
generator or as a synchronous condenser. 

Two oil-immersed, forced-air-cooled transformers, manufactured by the Ca- 
nadian Westinghouse Company Limited, have been installed to provide for trans- 
formation of the generator output from 13.8 kv to 138 or 230 kv. At present. 



Transformer Stations and Transmission Lines — ISorthern Ontario Properties 81 



one of these is in use to step up the output from the first two units to 138 
kv for transmission over a new Hne to Abitibi Canyon Generating Station. The 
other is installed as a spare. When the installation of the third and fourth gener- 
ating units has been completed, the two transformers will be used to step up the 
output from all four generating units to 230 kv for transmission to the 230 — 460-kv 
Pinard Transformer Station now under construction. 
The station is controlled 



IS 

from Abitibi Canyon Generat- 
ing Station by means of a 
microwave radio link. Even- 
tually it will be controlled from 
Pinard Transformer Station. 
The main and duplicate micro- 
wave radio has 25 multiplex 
channels which at present are 
used for telemetering, super- 
visory control, transferred trip, 
and voice, and in the future 
will also be used for load con- 
trol. The supervisory equip- 
ment provides for control of 
remote operations at a maxi- 
mum of 70 points. Although 
not all of the control points 
are used, supervision by lights 
and "on demand" telemetering 
are associated with each of 
them. Megawatts and mega- 
vars for each unit, and for the 
station as a whole are tele- 
metered continuously, and 
twenty-two quantities are tele- 
metered on the "on demand ' 
basis. A total of 138 annuncia- 
tion points, of which 113 are 
in use at present, indicate such 
occurrences as relay opera- 
tions, over-temperatures, low 
oil-levels, and other data re- 
quired for the successful oper- 
ation of the station. 



J!: 






■^ 




COLLAPSIBLE TOWER FOR USE IN SURVEY OPERATIONS — This 
triangular, aluminum-alloy tower, developed by the Commis- 
sion in co-operation with the manufacturers, can be extended 
in 10-foot sections to a height of 60 feet in order to increase 
the range of line-of-sight survey in hilly or wooded country. 
A 60-foot tower weighs 300 pounds. Survey crews have 
actually moved completely assembled 30-foot towers sus- 
pended upright beneath helicopters. 



Transformer Station and Transmission Lines 

In order to provide improved service security and increased transformer 
capacity to supply loads in Sudbury and the surrounding district, a third 41,000- 
kva, 115 — 44-kv transformer was installed at R. H. Martindale Transformer 
Station. Increases in capacity were made also at Kapuskasing Transformer 
Station, where a second 8,000-kva transformer was installed, and at Timmins 



82 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



jWM^i 



Transformer Station, where the capacity of each of the two 60-cycle, 115 — 27.6-kv 
transformer banks was increased from 14,500 kva to 18,000 kva by the installation 
of forced-air cooling. 

In the Northwestern Region, improved service security was provided by the 
installation of high-speed power-line carrier relaying on the key interconnecting 
115-kv circuits linking Dryden, Moose Lake, Port Arthur No. 1, and Port Arthur- 
Birch Transformer Stations. In Fort William, a short, 115-kv, double-circuit trans- 
mission line was built from 
Thunder Bay Generating Sta- 
tion to Abitibi Junction. To 
be used eventually to deliver 
power from the generating sta- 
tion to the Northwestern Divi- 
sion system, the line was used 
initially to deliver power to the 
generating station for testing 
purposes. 

Construction began in 1981 
on the 228-mile extra-high- 
voltage transmission line and 
the other transmission and 
transformation facilities which 
will be used to collect power 
generated at the new stations 
now being developed in the 
James Bay watershed, and to 
deliver it to Hanmer Trans- 
former Station, which will be 
constructed as the southern 
terminal of the line near Sud- 
bury. Scheduled for comple- 
tion in 1963, the line, initially 
connected with the power 
system at R. H. Martindale 
Transformer Station, will be 
operated at first at 230 kv. 
Eventually the voltage will be 
increased to 460 kv. Present 
plans involve the extension of 
this line from Hanmer Transformer Station southward to the Toronto area for opera- 
tion in 1966. Engineering design and construction were in progress during 1961 for 
Pinard Transformer Station, the northern terminal of the line, near Abitibi Canyon 
Generating Station. 

South of Timmins and the site of the future Porcupine Transformer Station, 
36 miles of the transmission-line right of way were cleared. For the northern 
section, between Timmins and Pinard Transformer Station, the major part of the 




During 1961 the Commission placed orders for approximately 
800 V-shaped towers of this type for use on the Ehv line 
north from Sudbury to power developments in the James Bay 
watershed. Guyed steel towers are about two-thirds the weight 
of conventional self-supporting towers, and guyed aluminum 
towers less than half the weight of guyed steel towers. 
Economies will result from lower transportation and labour 
costs in handling guyed towers as compared with self-sup- 
porting towers of comparable quality. 



Transformer Stations and Transmission Lines — Northern Ontario Properties 83 

right of way was cleared, and 100 transmission towers were delivered to the site in 
preparation for the erection of the line. 

The use of guyed, V-type transmission towers on this line represents a signifi- 
cant change in the Commission's transmission tower design practice, and follows a 
trend which has been developing among electrical utilities, both in Europe and in 
North America. Design studies conducted by the Commission indicated that for the 
requirements of the extra-high-voltage line, with foundations and accessories in- 
cluded, a conventional self-supporting steel tower would weigh approximately 
19,000 pounds, and a guyed steel tower only 11,000 pounds. This reduction in 
weight, and the relative ease with which the guyed towers can be transported and 
erected will be of distinct advantage in the remote and rugged area where the line is 
being constructed. In comparison with the self-supporting tower, the guyed tower 
is expected to result in an over-all saving in installed cost. Of the 828 towers to be 
installed on the line, 100 will be fabricated of aluminum, and the balance of steel. 
Though the cost of the aluminum tower members is greater, their lighter weight 
will permit savings in erection costs. The erection of both types of guyed towers 
on the same line will enable the Commission to make a detailed comparison of 
the installed costs of towers fabricated from the two materials. 

A program of full-scale tests in the field was conducted in order to develop 
jl guy anchorages and methods for their installation which will be suitable for use in 
j the relatively inaccessible north country where maintenance costs must be kept 
at a minimum. 

Each phase of the single circuit to be carried on the line will consist of a 
bundle of four 0.9-inch-diameter conductors spaced 18 inches apart in a square 
pattern. 

Clearing of the 23-mile right of way for the Otter Rapids Generating Station 
to Pinard Transformer Station, 230-kv, single-circuit transmission line was com- 
pleted and the erection of towers was begun. Surveying was completed for a 28- 
mile, 230-kv, double-circuit transmission line to be constructed between Little Long 
Generating Station and Pinard Transformer Station. 



SECTION V 



RESEARCH AND TESTING ACTIVITIES 



IN September, the research and testing laboratory was transferred to its new 
modern quarters, the Ontario Hydro W. P. Dobson Research Laboratory, 
located on Kipling Avenue in western Metropolitan Toronto, at the Commission's 
A. W. Manby Service Centre. In November, construction was started for an 
adjacent separate high-voltage test building scheduled for completion early in 1962. 




ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS — In this area of the research laboratory, electronic devices 
for power-system operation are developed, and studies are undertaken for special problems in com- 
munications, telemetering, and in high-voltage and extra-high-voltage transmission. 



84 



Extra-high-voltage Studies 



«5 



The new laboratory provides much better and more spacious accommodation 
than was formerly available for research and testing. The building is air-conditioned, 
and electrically heated. For environmental test purposes, eighteen special rooms arc 
equipped to provide required conditions of temperature and relative humidity 
controlled within narrow specified limits. Other modern features include fluores- 
cent lighting of appropriate level, supplied at 600 volts; suitable electric-power 
supplies for the various laboratory areas, provided from special motor-generator 
sets through a main control panel with readily changed connections; convenient 
vertical shafts for electric, telephone, and intercommunication circuits, and for 
other building services; such facilities as a specially reinforced structural test floor 
of high-load capacity, and three experimental vibration-test spans of lengths ad- 
justable up to 120 feet; and provision for an anechoic test room. Some typical 
laboratory areas are shown in accompanying photographs. 

During the year, the usual research and testing services were provided as 
required in support of the Commission's technical needs. Co-operative work was 
continued with other research bodies, and contact with those having like interests 
was maintained as in past years. The improved facilities and accommodation will 
result in a considerable extension of services and activities. The scope of a few 
of these is indicated in the following paragraphs. 



Extra-high-voltage Studies 
Studies were continued relative to the design and construction of Ontario 
Hydro's first ehv transmission line, extending north from Sudbury to a point near 
Abitibi Canyon Generating Station. 

Combination Spacer 
and Damper 

A combination "spacer- 
damper" was developed for 
use with 4-conductor-bundle 
lines. The requirements are 
that the sub-conductors of the 
bundle be held at the proper 
spacing, and be protected 
against the damaging effects 
of "aeolian" vibration. The 
vibration - damping elements 
are of conducting silicone rub- 
ber similar to that in the 
dumb-bell-type torsional 
damper. Besides the main 
service requirements, the spac- 
er-damper must accommodate 
the relative longitudinal move- 
ments of the sub-conductors and be free from corona at operating voltages. In 
extensive field and laboratory tests the spacer-damper gave promise of meeting 
these requirements adequately for the service life of the line. 




HARDWARE FOR EXTRA-HIGH-VOLTAGE TRANSMISSION LINE 

— This combination spacer and damper was developed for use 

with four-conductor bundle lines. 



86 



Research and Testing Activities 



Conductor-suspension Assembly 

New principles of corona shielding were incorporated in the design of an 
ehv suspension assembly developed in co-operation with manufacturers. With this 
assembly, itself specially designed to prevent the introduction of corona, the sub- 
conductors of bundles are placed at the same level as the bottom insulator unit of 

the suspension string, rather 
than below it. This arrange- 
ment reduces insulator corona 
sufficiently to make corona 
shields unnecessary. 

Hardware Corona 

New methods were estab- 
lished and equipment was de- 
signed and built for tests of 
items of line hardware to en- 
sure freedom from corona un- 
der even the most adverse 
conditions. A new conductor 
voltage gradient calibration de- 
vice was developed to permit 
comparison of hardware-co- 
rona test results obtained in 
different laboratories, regard- 
less of the respective test ar- 




VOLTAGE-GRADIENT INDICATOR — In this simple device for 
basic corona studies the wire-mesh cylindrical cage enables 
critical surface voltage gradients to be obtained on conductors 
at relatively low test voltages. The transformer in the porcelain 
bushing in the centre background has a capacity of 10 kva 
at 150 kv. 



Insulators 

The necessity for making 
a selection from among in- 
sulators of various types avail- 
able for ehv transmission lines, and the design changes introduced in standard 
insulators by new suppliers prompted certain unusual mechanical studies. In one, 
appraisal was made of the relative damage that could be caused by gunfire of 
hunters to rod-type and to the familiar cap- and pin-type insulators. Controlled 
hits by heavy-calibre hunting ammunition broke the rod-type units so completely 
that if they had been in service, line outages would have resulted. On the other 
hand cap- and pin-type units remained mechanically intact even though most of 
the exposed porcelain was shattered. In another study insulators of various designs 
were compared with respect to their ability to withstand the repeated load and 
temperature cycling to which line insulators are exposed in service. The insulators 
were subjected to ten million load cycles and numerous thermal cycles from 
— 70°F. to +70°F. 



Conductor Stringing 

In the testing and development of equipment used in tension-stringing of 
ehv bundle-conductor lines, multi-sheave travellers, running-boards, and swivels 



Extra-high-voltage Studies 



87 



and fittings to connect the four sub-conductors and the pulling line to the running- 
board, were tested for strength and performance at temperatures down to sub-zero 
levels. The rotational tendency and stability of non-rotating wire ropes of several 
types were investigated. Tests were undertaken to determine the strength of other 
equipment such as cable grips, insulator lifting yokes, and a cable-car transfer 
bracket. In addition, investigation was made of the possible damaging effect which 
such equipment might have on conductors and insulators, with possible adverse 
effect ultimately on line operations. 



Tower-proximity Effect on Voltage Gradients 

In the design of an ehv transmission line, a maximum limit on conductor 
surface voltage gradient is specified in order to obtain acceptable levels both of 
radio interference and of corona loss. For Ontario Hydro's ehv line, the limiting 
values of voltage gradient 
were determined from tests at 
the Coldwater Project. The 
tower-proximity effect could 
not be accurately gauged, how- 
ever, since economical con- 
siderations had dictated that 
wooden structures be used in- 
stead of metal on the test line. 
Although the design gradient 
values were believed to be suf- 
ficient to provide for proximi- 
ty effect, an accurate estimate 
of the effect was considered 
necessary to verify whether 
simple and economical correc- 
tive measures could be applied 
if needed. For this purpose a 
1 :40 scale model of about 700 
feet of the ehv line was set up 
in a room darkened to permit 
visual corona observations. In 
tests, the corona inception vol- 
tages at mid-span were found 
to be only from 3 to 4 per cent 
less than those near the tower. 
Although the results indicated 

that gradient control near towers would in general not be required, various simple 
control measures were found for application in possible critical areas. 

With the model the corona inception voltages of the tower guy cables and of 
the overhead ground cables of the line also were checked. The data showed that 
no corona problem for these components need be expected. 




EHV TRANSMISSION-LINE MODEL — In order to obtain on 
accurate estimate of the effect of tower proximity on conduc- 
tor surface voltage gradient, a model of 700 feet of line was 
constructed on a scale of 1 :40. An area darkened to permit 
visible corona observations was used for tests with the model. 



88 



Research and Testing Activities 




STRUCTURAL TESTING — This view of the structural testing laboratory includes one corner of the tv/o- 
storey section. The floor in the foreground is specially reinforced to permit high-load capacity tests. 



Design and Construction 
Concrete for Reactor Building 

Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station 

To ensure that the concrete for the Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station 
reactor building would be both crack-free and durable, various special measures 
were developed and applied. By the use of fly ash from Richard L, Hearn 
Generating Station to replace part of the cement in the mix, the temperature rise 
after placing was kept low, so that subsequent cooling stresses were avoided. By 
the use of admixtures that maintain workability of the mix with a low water to 
cement ratio, the required strength in the concrete was obtained with a lower 
cement content than usual. As a further measure the building, which is circular, 
was built in alternate large and small segments, the large segments being placed 
first and allowed to cool before the filler segments were placed. Significant tem- 
perature rise of the filler segments was avoided by the use of ice in the mix. The 
crack-free condition of the completed structure displays the effectiveness of the 
precautions adopted and the thoroughness of control of the placing operations. 



New Concreting Practices — Otter Rapids Generating Station 

The greater degree of watertightness of Otter Rapids Generating Station dam 
as compared with earlier structures confirmed the effectiveness of several changes 
in concreting practices adopted at the project, which was built by the low-lift 



Design and Construction 89 

method of concrete placement. Horizontal cracks, which occur at random levels 
in older structures built by the high-lift method and are therefore a principal 
source of water leakage, occur only at horizontal joints in low-lift structures. 
Since the improved method of placing concrete by successive lifts in rapid se- 
quence does increase the number of horizontal joints, special precautions were 
taken to achieve watertightness. Between lifts all horizontal joints were sand- 
blasted, the bond between subsequent lifts being thus improved. Significant water 
leakage at horizontal joints is prevented by the use of short lengths of plastic 
waterstop extending horizontally from the vertical waterstop for short distances 
along the horizontal joints. The required length of such stub waterstops was 
established by coring during early stages of construction. 

False Set in Cement 

In recent years, some field problems with concrete during placing were 
traced to what is known as a false-set tendency of the cement being used. Such a 
false-set tendency can induce early stiffening in concrete for which the mixing 
period has been relatively short. A short mixing period is characteristic of the 
large central mixing plants that supply concrete for major hydraulic projects. 
With cement that has false-set tendencies, the use of water-reducing admixtures, 
now a standard Ontario Hydro practice, tends to aggravate the abnormal setting 
characteristics. Since existing standard tests have proved inadequate for predicting 
premature stiffening of concrete, the performance of cement must be checked not 
only at the standard test temperature of 70°F. but also at 50°F., which fre- 
quently is the temperature of the mix for mass concrete. With the co-operation 
of the companies supplying cement to Ontario Hydro, the problem of the pro- 
duction of cement having false-set tendencies is now being brought under control. 
The development of suitable test procedures for early detection of false set in 
cement is being fostered through participation in co-operative studies under the 
auspices of national standardizing bodies. 

Blasting Control 

In order to avoid damage to existing structures from blasting operations 
nearby, data to help establish the physical laws involved have been collected as 
opportunities became available. Some years ago, in co-operation with the National 
Research Council, experimental blasts were set off adjacent to buildings scheduled 
for demolition in the headpond area of the Robert H. Saunders-St. Lawrence 
Generating Station. In a similar situation more recently at the current Carillon 
development of Quebec Hydro on the Ottawa River, test blasting was again 
conducted in co-operation with the National Research Council, with the Com- 
mission primarily providing technical advice. Further data were obtained from a 
study of blasting in close proximity to the Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station 
reactor building, with blasting procedures based on Ontario Hydro recommenda- 
tions. 

Experience derived from these methodical studies of blasting will enable 
future blasting operations near buildings to be planned for maximum efficiency, 
but with a greater margin of safety than in the past. 



90 



Research and Testing Activities 



Varved Clay 

There are numerous varved-clay deposits in Ontario. They occur chiefly in 
the areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, in the Northern Clay Belt around Timmins 
and Cochrane, and in an area extending westward from Rainy Lake into Manitoba. 
The notable engineering feature of this clay is its stratification, usually of coarse 
and fine material in alternate layers, two contiguous layers being known as a couplet. 

In a recent foundation study for a proposed dam site where there are varved- 
clay deposits of considerable depth, a detailed study was undertaken of similar 
clays exposed at an adjacent landslip. New classification and testing techniques 
were developed for this non-uniform clay since standard procedures are normally 
based on assumptions of homogeneity. 

The properties of the several layers were determined in detail, and compared. 
Although the properties of the relatively silty and the relatively clayey materials 
differ markedly, the particular site studied showed no significant difference from 
couplet to couplet with increasing depth. Consequently the results of a study of 
any particular couplet could be considered representative of the deposit. From the 
testing, reasonable appraisals were possible of such engineering properties of the 
deposit as strength and compressibility. 

Muskeg 

In the current development of hydraulic-power sites in northern Ontario, 
the presence of muskeg creates problems, particularly for the construction of 





APPLIED MECHANICS — The photograph shows part of the laboratory for the study of problems in- 
volving stress and strain, force, pressure, noise, and vibration. 



Evaluation and Application Studies 91 

access roads and transmission lines. For the better understanding of the problems 
involved, suitable testing techniques were developed. The behaviour in compression 
and in shear of samples of peat from the area around Abitibi Canyon and Little 
Long Generating Stations was studied in the laboratory. Of particular interest was 
the great strength developed by the muskeg after consolidation. 

In a study of the classification of muskeg from aerial photographs, for a 
length of transmission-line right of way south of Otter Rapids good correlation 
was established between the classification based on the photographs and that from 
actual ground observations. The information is intended as a guide in aerial 
muskeg classification surveys. 

Ehv Transmission Tower Anchors 

Based mainly on field test results, a high-capacity anchor was developed for 
the guyed-tower structure being used for the ehv transmission line now under 
construction. The anchor was designed for use in the soft soils in the Timmins area 
and in the soils underlying muskeg farther north. The anchor consists of a buried 
horizontal log held down by two or three more deeply embedded commercial 
anchors installed vertically. The total guy capacity is largely determined by the 
vertical anchors; special backfilling and pre-tensioning of the vertical anchors are 
necessary in order to obtain the high-capacity anchorage required. 



Blading Strain — Steam Turbines 

Because of service fatigue failures of blading in a steam turbine at the 
Richard L. Hearn Generating Station, the service strains were measured in some 
of the blading for the full range of normal turbine operating conditions. On the 
basis of the measured data and of related vibration studies in the laboratory, 
suitable measures for preventing the damaging blade vibrations were recom- 
mended. It is significant that only a few years ago such studies would not have 
been possible. Now, with the rapid advances in strain and allied measurement 
work the working strains in machine members operating in relatively inaccessible 
locations under demanding conditions can be successfully investigated. 



Evaluation and Application Studies 

Use of Spray-applied Urethane Foam for Thermal Insulation 

For the Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station reactor building steel dome, 
exterior thermal insulation is required to prevent condensation on the interior 
surface and, by equalization of thermal stresses, to ensure dimension stability of 
the structure. For a number of reasons conventional materials were deemed un- 
suitable. Consequendy recently developed spray-applied urethane foams were in- 
vestigated for the purpose. Commercial foams were improved and developed 
to provide the necessary strength and other requirements. The addition of fluoro- 
chlorohydrocarbon increased the thermal efficiency of the foam by fifty per cent. 



92 



Research and Testing Activities 



'X/.i/.,y/>^ifi 4'J! ^^, i^»j^<i^-»lc> 




FACILITIES FOR CHEMICALS TESTING — Studies axQ made of lubricants, insulating liquids, and petro- 
leum products of all types used by the Commission, as well as analyses and evaluation of paints and 
emulsions of various kinds for control of plant grov/th and insects. 



Automotive Undercoatings 

Underbody metal corrosion caused by water, principally in conjunction with 
de-icing salts sprinkled on roads each winter, has been a major factor in the cost 
of repairs to trucks and automobiles in the Ontario Hydro fleet. Conventional 
asphalt-asbestos-clay undercoatings previously used, although inexpensive, proved 
unsatisfactory. Laboratory evaluation of grease and graphite-loaded grease coat- 
ings, rubberized asphalt, pigmented rubber paints and high-solids rubber mastic 
coatings, indicated that only the 100 per cent rubber coating was completely 
satisfactory and suitable for protecting underbody metals for the 8-year period 
required for some vehicles. 

Live-line Tools 

The safe-working-load ratings for wood-type live-line tools currently used by 
Ontario Hydro were determined. Items tested were those that are normally sub- 
jected to relatively high service loads. The study prompted further tests on live-line 
tools of the foam-filled, glass-reinforced epoxy resin type. The tests provided a 
comparison between tools of wood and of plastic, and between plastic tools from 
various suppliers, to ensure for Ontario Hydro the selection of tools that offer 
maximum economy together with adequate safety. 

Underwater Metal Coatings 

In long-term laboratory and field immersion tests of underwater paint ma- 
terials, several coatings of the newer types have performed satisfactorily. For 



System Operation and Miscellaneous Studies 93 

underwater gate coatings where high resistance to ice abrasion is a major require- 
ment, vinyl and coal-tar epoxy systems applied on the basis of laboratory recom- 
mendations have proved successful. 

Motor-vehicle Seat Belts 

Following the decision to equip certain Ontario Hydro passenger vehicles 
with safety seat belts, an evaluation was made of several types available and a 
satisfactory method of anchoring the belts was developed based on internationally 
accepted requirements. The method is adaptable with only slight modification to 
vehicles of a range of sizes and types. 



System Operation 

Economic Power Despatch 

An operations research team is continuing its investigations with a view to 
developing an automatic scheduling procedure for determining the optimum daily 
operation on an hour-to-hour basis of major thermal and hydraulic power stations 
and of tie-lines with other power utilities. By the use of new mathematical techni- 
ques and the operation of the Commission's Univac II computer experimental 
schedules are now being produced for the Southern Ontario System. These indicate 
possible daily savings in excess of one thousand dollars whenever system demand 
substantially exceeds the capacity of hydraulic resources. 

Power-line Carrier Amplifiers — St. Lawrence Circuits 

Signal levels in the power-line carrier channels from St. Lawrence Trans- 
former Station to Hinchinbrooke Switching Station, and to Richview Transformer 
Station were insufficiently high for reliable telemetering under adverse weather 
conditions. A continuation of studies mentioned briefly in last year's Report, 
established the feasibility of direct insertion of a signal amplifier in the carrier 
bypass at an intermediate station; tests indicated that the resulting signals are at a 
satisfactory level. The advantage of this technique of signal amplification is 
avoidance of the complications and expense necessitated by the usual procedure 
involving changes of signal frequency. A direct-insertion amplifier was built and 
installed in the carrier bypass circuit at Hinchinbrooke Switching Station. The 
signal levels to date have been ample for reliable carrier operation. 



Miscellaneous Studies 

Inventory Management 

In the now completed second stage of a planned sequence of operations 
research studies with respect to Commission stores, new operational concepts were 
applied to the whole range of materials management. Advanced methods of stock 
control were introduced, and an integrated information system was developed for 
use by all concerned. Inventories were substantially reduced. In addition, significant 
improvements were achieved in reducing not only the frequency of material 
shortages, but also the time required to supply material from central warehouses 
to regional stores. 



94 Research and Testing Activities 

Air Pollution 

For a three-year period, a study was made of air pollution in the vicinity of 
the Richard L. Hearn Generating Station in the east end of Toronto. The purpose 
was to determine, by measurements of sulphur dioxide and dust, whether pollution 
is caused at ground level by the station stack gases. 

The measured values, correlated with relevant meteorological and operating 
data, show that under average conditions the generating station has a negligible 
effect on prevailing sulphur dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Dustfall sufficient 
to be measurable occurs only very close to the station and mainly on Ontario 
Hydro property. The quantities of fine particles in the atmosphere could not be 
attributed in any way to the operation of the station. 

Coronaphone 

The task of accurately locating radio-interference sources on a power line has 
long been difficult. Recently, a new method was developed for locating the 
sources precisely, based on the fact that corona produces audible noise along with 
radio-frequency noise. The method involves the use of a device called a corona- 
phone, which combines a highly sensitive microphone and a directional reflector. 
With the coronaphone the origin of audible noise 100 feet away on a transmission 
line can be determined to within one foot. The unit is self-contained and portable, 
and can be operated in the field by one man. 



I 



SECTION VI 



STAFF RELATIONS 



WITH the increasing use of automatic equipment, and the changes in organi- 
zation that have their origin in this and other administrative developments, 
there is evidence of a gradual shift in the composition of the Commission's staff. 
While the total number employed on regular staff remained relatively stable over the 
past year, there was a notable increase in the number engaged in marketing, both at 
Head Office and in the Regions. On the other hand, there has been in recent years 
a fairly continuous decline in technical and trades staff and in some groups of 
clerical staff. In view of these shifts, the number of management and professional 
employees, though not significantly changed in total during 1961, has become a 
continuously increasing proportion of the regular staff over the years, rising from 
under 10 per cent in 1958 to approximately 12 per cent in 1961. 

Personnel Planning and Development 

In conformity with this trend the Commission attaches great importance to 
recruiting the most promising candidates for this category of employment, and 
subsequently seeks to provide them with adequate opportunity to develop their 
qualifications. Canadian universities continue to be the prime source of recruits. 
During 1961, twenty engineering graduates were engaged for training by the Com- 
mission for positions of responsibility. 

Training has been generally expanded over the past 5 years to enable manage- 
ment and professional staff to deal more effectively with increasingly complex man- 
agement problems. An interesting development during 1961 was the introduction, 
within the organization, of advanced training for senior management personnel. The 
program will involve a total of about 200 persons for short periods of concentrated 
study over a two-year period. In addition to these courses, voluntary seminars held 
outside normal working hours continue to interest approximately 250 specially 
selected members of the staff. 

95 



96 



Staff Relations 




CONSTRUCTION COLONY AT LITTLE LONG GENERATING STATION — In 1961 between 800 and 900 
members of the Commission's construction staff were living in this community, not as it might appear 
at a junction point on a modern expressway, but 250 miles north of Sudbury and with access to the 
outside world for the most part only by rail. The colony will also serve for construction at Harmon 

and Kipling Generating Stations. 



Particular effort is being directed to the retraining of experienced staff whose 
jobs have been affected or eHminated by reorganization, technological change, or 
the introduction of automatic equipment. Of some 150 employees thus affected in 
1961, approximately 84 per cent have been given on the job training and either 
have been, or are on the point of being, relocated where their skill and experience 
can effectively serve the Commission. 

Employment Statistics 

During 1961 the monthly average number of employees on the staff included 
12,515 regular and 2,582 temporary employees for a total of 15,097. While there 
was little variation from month to month in the number of regular employees, 
temporary staff ranged from a high of 3,319 to a low of 1,917. These employees 
are engaged for the most part in seasonal work in construction and maintenance. 

Labour Relations 

Agreements were negotiated with the Allied Construction Council, an asso- 
ciation of a number of craft unions engaged in construction activity throughout the 
province, and with two units of the Canadian Union of Operating Engineers acting 
for employees at Richard L. Hearn and J. Clark Keith Generating Stations. These 
agreements were to be in effect until January 31, 1962, and June 27, 1962, respec- 
tively. Bargaining began early in January 1961 for the renewal of the agreement 



Accident Prevention 



97 



with the Ontario Hydro Employees Union representing about 9,000 operating, 
maintenance, and clerical employees. The agreement terminated on March 31, 
1961. When after lengthy discussion it became apparent that there was little likeli- 
hood of reconciling outstanding differences, application was made for conciliation 
services under the Labour Relations Act. Subsequently a Conciliation Board was 
established, and when a report was submitted in early February 1962, the Com- 
mission accepted the recommendations of the Board, but the Union declined to 
do so. 

Accident Prevention 

With the advances recorded over recent years, it becomes increasingly difficult 
to achieve over-ail statistical improvement in the frequency or rated severity of 
accidents per million hours worked. The maintenance of an excellent standard may 
itself be regarded as no mean achievement. As measured by the American Stand- 
ards Association method, the accident frequency rate remained unchanged in 1961, 
and while the severity rate increased somewhat, it was still only 66 per cent of the 
average for the preceding five years. 

Special recognition should be given the Eastern and Niagara (as constituted 
prior to January 1, 1962) Regions for extending their accident-free records beyond 





THE LITTLE LONG EXPRESS — Though freight cars greatly outnumber the passenger coaches, and the 
latter are somewhat antiquated, this daily train between Kapuskasing and the Little Long Generating 
Station site via the Spruce Falls Power and Paper Company Railway is for most of the staff at the site 
their one link with the outside world. For Little Long Generating Station alone, the train will transport 
an estimated 130,000 tons of material. It will also carry material for the two other new stations on 
the Mattagami River for trans-shipment by road from Little Long Generating Station. 



98 



Staff Relations 




COFFERDAM CONSTRUCTION AT LITTLE LONG RAPIDS — In April 1961, timber work for the first-stage 
cofferdam was extended from the west bonk into the Mattagomi River. The workmen took the pre- 
caution of working with the protection of life-lines. When the U-shaped rock-filled timber crib was 
complete, the area within was pumped dry to permit construction of the diversion section. 



another million-hour level to bring their respective accident-free totals to 3,168,492 
and 2,052,547 man-hours. The construction forces at Thunder Bay Generating 
Station completed a year without a compensable accident. It is worth noting that 
the Commission's record in 1961 for employees engaged in the construction of 
major power facilities was sufficiently favourable that the cost per hundred dollars 
of payroll for carrying workmen's compensation protection for these forces was 
lower than the cost in 1960 by 35 per cent. Even the 1960 cost was little more 
than half that experienced in comparable construction activities outside the Com- 
mission. 



For the seventh consecutive year the frequency of motor vehicle accidents in 
the operation of the Commission's transport equipment was reduced. On the basis 
of a new American Standards Association scale the frequency declined from 15 to 
13 accidents per million miles driven. 

Three members of the staff are to be commended for their part in saving lives 
by the application of artificial respiration. Mr. Benjamin Simpson of the Brampton 
Area resuscitated a man suffering from severe electric shock, and Messrs. R. E. 
Jarick and H. R. Clark of Eugenia Generating Station were able to save a three- 
year-old girl from drowning. 



Medical Services 



99 



Ten employees owe their escape from serious injury and possibly from death 
to their observance of the rule regarding the wearing of hard hats in conformity 
with sound industrial safety practice. 

Medical Services 

As part of the general program for the maintenance and improvement of 
health, greater emphasis has been placed recently on the maintenance of physical 
fitness and on preventive action with regard to mental health. The Commission's 
experience in the latter has attracted considerable attention from other industries 
and interested agencies. 

Radiation protection training has been given to approximately 70 employees 
who form the operating staff at the Nuclear Power Demonstration plant. The neces- 
sary regulations have been prepared in advance of the in-service date of the station, 
and steps have been taken to ensure proper supervision of all radioactive sources 
under Commission jurisdiction. The fact that there are now between 250 and 300 
applications of radioactive materials in the Commission's operations is some indica- 
tion of the importance of these regulations. It is also the basis of quite widespread 
public interest in them. 

The field hospital at Little Long Generating Station was opened on January 1 , 
1961, and the hospital at Otter Rapids Generating Station was closed on December 




CAFETERIA SERVICE AT LITTLE LONG GENERATING STATION — Healthful air and vigorous v/ork in the 
north country sharpen the appetite and add zest to the meal. During 1961 nearly 700,000 meals were 
served in the cafeteria at this new power development project, nearly 250 miles north of Sudbury. 



100 Staff Relations 

1, 1961. The medical-aid posts established as required at several locations con- 
tinued to serve the immediate needs of the staff. 

Early in 1961 an outbreak of infectious hepatitis at Little Long Generating 
Station was a cause for some concern. The epidemic was, however, quickly brought 
under control by the strict enforcement of hygienic rules and the administering of 
gamma globulin to those exposed to the infection. 



APPENDIX I— OPERATIONS 



THE tables in Appendix I are supplementary to the descriptive information 
on the year's operations given in Section I, and to information relating to the 
delivery of power and energy in wholesale quantities given in Section III. 

The table of power resources and requirements gives for each system and in 
total the primary peak requirements for the month of December, and the depend- 
able capacity of the Commission's resources at the time these peak requirements 
occurred. A separate table on pages 102 and 103 gives the December dependable 
capacity and maximum output of each Commission-owned station and each source 
of purchased power. The dependable capacity of a station is the net output which 
it can be expected to supply at the time of the system primary peak requirements, 
assuming that all units are available and that the supply of water is normal. This 
capacity may be recalculated from time to time in accordance with changing con- 
ditions. The capacity of a source of purchased power is based on the terms of the 
purchase contract. 

The Analysis of Energy Sales on pages 106 and 107 shows how the kilowatt- 
hours generated or purchased by the Commission and the associated municipal 
utilities were distributed to the various classes of ultimate customers or to inter- 
connected systems. 

Statistics of peak loads and capacities are given, as elsewhere in the Report, 
in kilowatts rather than in horsepower. The kilowatt figures may be converted to 
horsepower by assuming that one horsepower is equivalent to 0.746 kilowatts. 

101 



102 



Appendix I — Operations 
THE COMMISSION'S POWER RESOURCES— 1961 



Southern Ontario System 



River 



Hydro-electric Generating Stations 



Niagara tSir Adam Beck-Niagara No. 1 

Sir Adam Beck-Niagara No. 2 

Pumping-Generating Station 

tOntario Power 

tToronto Power 

Welland Canal DeCew Falls No. 1 

DeCew Falls No. 2 

Adjustment to Niagara River stations to compensate 
for use of water by Ontario Hydro rather than by 
another producer . 



Muskoka 
South Muskoka 



Beaver 
Severn 
Saugeen 
Trent 



Otonabee 



St. Lawrence 
Ottawa 



Madawaska 



Mississippi 
Rideau 



Ragged Rapids 

Big Eddy 

South Falls 

Trethewey Falls 

Hanna Chute 

Eugenia 

Big Chute 

Hanover 

Heely Falls 

Ranney Falls 

Meyersburg 

Sidney 

Hagues Reach 

Seymour 

Frankford 

Sills Island 

Auburn 

Lakefield 

Robert H. Saunders-St. Lawrence. 

Des Joachims 

Otto Holden 

Chenaux 

Chats Falls (Ontario half) 

Stewartville 

Barrett Chute 

Calabogie 

High Falls 

Galetta 

Merrickville 



Dependable 
capacity* 



kw 



440,000 
,335,000 

150,000 
67,000 
37,000 
26,000 

130,000 



75,000 

7,500 

7,100 

4,200 

1,600 

1,200 

5,400 

4,300 

250 

11,150 

8,350 

5,100 

3,350 

3,250 

2,950 

2,550 

1,550 

1,750 

1,650 

651,000 

372,000 

210,000 

117,000 

82,000 

63,000 

42,000 

4,400 

2,450 

800 

900 



Total hydro- electric 3,728,750 



Location Thermal-electric Generating Stations 

Windsor J. Clark Keith 

Toronto Richard L. Hearn 

Lakeview 

Total thermal-electric 

Total generated — Southern Ontario System 



Sources of Purchased Power 

Detroit Edison Company 

tNiagara Mohawk Power Corporation 

{Canadian Niagara Power Company, Limited 

Power Authority of the State of New York 

Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission 

Gatineau Power Company 

Maclaren-Quebec Power Company 

Ottawa Valley Power Company 

Miscellaneous (relatively small suppliers) 

Total purchased — Southern Ontario System .... 



244,000 
1,128,000 



1.372,000 



5.100,750 



15,000 

l'87,006 

239,000 

93.000 

82,000 



616,000 



Maximum 
output* 



kw 



427,500 
1,278,000 

132,000 

120,000 
88,000 
32,500 

140,600 



8,100 

8,250 

4,400 

1,600 

1,400 

2,400 

4,380 

260 

12,075 

8,760 

5,800 

3,450 

3,700 

3,200 

2,900 

930 

1,810 

1.620 

787.000 

373,200 

221,000 

118.400 

88.000 

66,000 

42,000 

4,440 

2,800 

385 

278 



127.000 
667,500 
150,000 



82,000 

415,000 

23,000 

421,000 

248,800 

107,000 

88,000 



Annual energy 
output (net) 



kwh 



2.595.294,400 
8.655.046,100 
11A,572,000 
807.428.000 
367.779.200 
143.401.000 
919,919,100 



33,850,890 

32,536.250 

26,020,640 

9,907,200 

8,211,700 

15,814,800 

29,856,800 

1,270,750 

62.127,740 

46,171.000 

31,104.270 

17,392.500 

20,704.130 

16.691,040 

14,414,400 

5,884,180 

9,802,800 

5,085,410 

6,245,841.000 

2,106,097,300 

1,060,594,900 

682,022,800 

444,966,300 

177,050,400 

166.401,800 

24,066,270 

10,362,240 

3,076,430 

2,681,420 



24,684,303.160 



99,608,100 

406.064,900 

7,862,800 



513,535,800 



25,197,838,960 



201,002,200 

1,117,016,000 

15,622,000 

39,472,000^ 

2,817,477,000 

1,462.074,500 

597,072,000 

446,522,700 

4,278,971 



6,700.537,371 



t 25 cycle. 



t 25 and 60 cycle. 



The power capacity and output referred to in this table are 20-minute peaks for the month of December. Since 
the various maximum outputs do not coincide, their sum is not the peak load of the system. 

Includes 538,000 kwh wheeled to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation for Power Authority of the State of New 
York. 



Capacity and Output of Power Resources 
THE COMMISSION'S POWER RESOURCES 1961 



103 



Northern Ontario Properties 

Northeastern Division 

River Hydro-electric Generating Stations 

Abitibi JAbitibi Canyon 

Otter Rapids 

Adjustment for temporary limitation in 60-cycle 
transmission capacity from Abitibi River stations 
Mississagi George W. Rayner 

Red Rock Falls 

Mattagami fWawaitin 

fLower Sturgeon 

fSandy Falls 

Montreal Upper Notch 

Hound Chute 

Indian Chute 

Fountain Falls 

Wanapitei Stinson 

Coniston 

McVittie 

Matabitchuan Matabitchuan 

Sturgeon Crystal Falls 

South Nipissing 

Elliott Chute 

Bingham Chute 

Kagawong Kagawong 

Total hydro-electric 



Location Diesel -electric Generating Stations 

Kagawong Kagawong (diesel portion ) 

Chapleau Chapleau 

Hornepayne Hornepayne 

Total diesel-electric 

Total generated — Northeastern Division 

Northwestern Division 

River Hydro-electric Generating Stations 

Nipigon Pine Portage 

Cameron Falls 

Alexander 

English Caribou Falls 

Manitou Falls 

Ear Falls 

Silver Falls 

Kakabeka Falls 

Whitedog Falls 

Aguasabon 

Rat Rapids 

Total generated — Northwestern Division 



Kaministikwia 

Winnipeg 

Aguasabon 

Albany 



Sources of Purchased Power 

Northeastern Division 

tAbitibi Power & Paper Company, Limited 

tQuebec Hydro-Electric Commission 

Great Lakes Power Corporation, Limited 

Miscellaneous (relatively small suppliers) 

Total purchased — Northeastern Division 



Northwestern Division 

Ontario Minnesota Pulp & Paper Company 

Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board 

Total purchased — Northwestern Division. . . . 

Total generated — All systems 

Total purchased — All systems 

Total generated and purchased — All systems 



Dependable 
capacity* 



kw 



232,000 
88,000 

59,000 

47,000 

40,000 

10,800 

6,000 

2,700 

8,400 

3,600 

3,000 

2,000 

5,700 

4,100 

2,200 

8,800 

8,200 

1,600 

1,400 

900 



417,400 



600 
1,000 



1.600 



419,000 



119,200 
76,700 
60,900 
79,300 
65.700 
15,900 
45,100 
25,000 
61,700 
44.000 



593,500 



.500 



1.500 



3.000 



3,000 

6,113,250 

620,500 



6,733,750 



Maximum 
output* 



kw 



228,500 
88,000 



46,470 

40,000 

10,800 

6,000 

2.710 

8,180 

3,810 

3,000 

2,140 

4,260 

4,130 

2,160 

10,000 

8,100 

1,610 

1,480 

930 



408 
761 



130,000 
78,000 
63.000 
77,000 
64,500 
15,200 
45,000 
21,750 
62,000 
46,300 



6,300 
37,600 
45,500 

6,965 



2,148 
17,500 



Annual energy 
output (net; 



kwh 



1,441,104,600 
126,298.000 



345,207,960 

205,634,800 

57,887,908 

44,907,168 

21,696,504 

55,194,000 

30,529,600 

18,611,720 

15,706,032 

26,410,000 

26,676,180 

16,048.120 

66,870,400 

50,112,000 

10,530,600 

5,137,060 

4,662,820 

2,136.520 



2,571,361,992 



2.600 
1,015,680 
3,498,200 



4,516,480 



2,575,878,472 



724,799,570 
492,744,700 
389,087,760 
399,707,000 
282.141,400 
93,154,600 
200,845,400 
153,307,100 
295,393.000 
295,748,170 
13.000 



3,326,941,700 



5,874,480 

133,337,602 

80,762,000 

24,802,522 



244,776,604 



11.324,000 
154,956,100 



166,280,100 

31.100,659,132 

7.111.594.075 



38,212,253,207 



104 



Appendix I — Operations 



POWER RESOURCES 



Southern Ontario System 1961 

1960 
Northern Ontario Properties 

Northeastern Division 1961 

1960 

Total 1961 

1960 
Net increase or decrease 

Southern Ontario System 

Northeastern Division 

Total 

Northern Ontario Properties 

Northwestern Division 1961 

1960 
Net increase or decrease 

Northwestern Division 

Total— All systems 1961 

1960 







December dependable 


Commission stations 


Hydro-electric 


Thermal-electrict 


Total 


kw 
3,728,750 
3,948,750 


kw 

1,372,000 

994,000 


5,100^750 
4,942,750 


417,400 

368,400 

4,146,150 

4,317,150 


1,600 

1,900 

1,373,600 

995,900 


419,000 

370,300 

5,519,750 

5,313,050 


220,000 

49,000 

171,000 


378,000 

300 

377,700 


158,000 

48,700 

206,700 


593,500 
593,900 






593,500 
593,900 


1,00 





AOO 


4,739,650 
4,911,950 


1,373,600 
995,900 


6,113,250 
5,906,950 



The capacities shown are those available for a 20-minute period at the times of system primary peak demand in each 
of the three operating systems in December, the capacity of sources of purchased power being based on the terms of 
the purchase contract. Requirements shown are the December coincident peaks for each system and their arithmetic 
sum. 



ANNUAL ENERGY 



Energy Made Available by the Commission 



Southern Ontario System 
Generated (net) 

hydro-electric 

thermal-electric 



Total generated 

Purchased 

Transferred* in or out (net) . 

Primary 

Secondary 



Total 



Northern Ontario Properties 
northeastern division 
Generated (net) 

hydro-electric 

diesel-electric 



Total generated 

Purchased 

Transferred* in or out (net) . 

Primary 

Secondary 



Total 



NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

Generated (net) 

hydro-electric 



Purchased . 



Primary. . 
Secondary 



Total 



All Systems 

Generated (net) 

hydro-electric 

thermal- and diesel-electric 

Total generated 

Purchased 



Primary. . 
Secondary . 



Total 



1960 



kwh 



26,063,437,785 
165,068,900 



26,228,506,685 
5,676,309,904 
1,357,163,000 



26,321.728,089 
4,225,925,500 



30,547,653,589 30,547,653,589 



2,191,755,625 
4,417,860 



2,196,173,485 

215,038,946 

1,357,163,000 



3,636,699,913 
131,675,518 



3,768,375,431 



3,288,639,700 
104,214,208 



3.768,375,431 



2,759,000,194 
633.853.714 



3,392,853,908 



31,543,833,110 
169,486,760 



3,392,853,908 



31,713,319,870 
5,995,563,058 



32.717,428,196 
4,991,454.732 



37,708,882,928 37,708,882,928 



1961 



kwh 



24,684.303,160 
513.535,800 



25,197,838,960 

6,700,537,371 

877,316,000 



27.610,376,454 
3,410,683,877 



31,021,060,331 31,021,060.331 



2.571.361.992 
4,516,480 



2,575,878,472 
244,776,604 
877.316,000 



3,561,305,871 
136,665,205 



3,697,971,076 



3,326,941,700 
166,280,100 



3,697,971,076 



2,689,678,320 
803,543,480 



3,493.221.800 



30.582.606,852 
518,052,280 



3,493,221,800 



31,100,659,132 
7.111.594,075 



33,861,360,645 
4,350.892,562 



38,212,253,207 38,212,253,207 



Increase 

or 
decrease 



per cent 



5.3 
211.1 

3.9 
18.0 
35. A 

4.9 
19.3 

1.5 



17.3 
2.2 

17.3 

13.8 

55. i 

2.1 

3.8 

1.9 



1.2 
59.6 



2.5 
26.8 



3.0 



3.0 
205.6 



1.9 
18.6 



3.5 
12.8 



*Net mterchange between Southern Ontario System and Northeastern Division of the Northern Ontario Properties. 



Resources and Loads 



105 



AND REQUIREMENTS 



capacity* 


Primary power 
requirements* 


Reserve 




Sources of 

purchased 

power 


Total 
dependable 
capacity* 


Ratio of 

reserve to 

requirements 


61J0OO 
616,000 


kw 
5.716.750 
5,558,750 


4,982^455 
4,772,583 


kw 


per cent 


1,500 

1,200 

617,500 

617,200 


420,500 

371.500 

6,137.250 

5.930.250 


543,944 

551,661 

5,526,399 

5,324,244 


610,851 
606,006 


11.1 
11.4 



300 
300 


158.000 

49.000 

207.000 


209,872 

7,717 

202,155 






3,000 
2 000 


596,500 
595,900 


422.418 
421.438 


174,082 
174.462 


41.2 
41.4 


1.000 


600 


980 






620.500 
619.200 


6.733,750 
6,526.150 


5,948,817 
5,745.682 


** 

** 


** 
** 



** There is no interconnection between the Northwestern Division and the other operating systems of the Commission 

t Includes diesel-electric. 



ACCOUNT 



Energy Disposed of by the Commission in Wholesale Quantities 






1960 


1961 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Southern Ontario System 

Primary — Municipal electrical utilities 


kwh 

16.828.812.615 

4.972,000 

421,380,355 

2,508,393.230 

4.218.341.434 


kwh 

18,291.018.225 

5.287,048 

332,557,374 

2.567.931,903 

4,057,515,694 


per cent 

8.7 
6.3 

21.1 
2.4 
3.8 


— Local systems 


— Interconnected systems, for resale 




— Direct industrial customers 




Total primary 


23,981.899,634 
4.005.775,000 


25,254,310.244 
3,177,492.280 


5.3 

20.7 


Secondary — Interconnected systems, for resale 

—Direct industrial customers 


Total secondary 


4,005.775.000 


3.177,492,280 


20.7 


Total primary and secondary 


27.987.674.634 
2.559.978.955 


28,431,802.524 
2,589.257.807 


1.6 
1.1 


Losses and unaccounted for 


Total 


30.547.653.589 

377.674,126 

182.088.374 

17.706.000 

261.457,029 

2,424,728,620 


31.021,060.331 

409,730,825 

189,833,915 

19,438,000 

284,686,601 

2,266,859,025 


1.5 

8.5 
4.3 
9.8 
8.9 
6.5 


Northern Ontario Properties 
northeastern division 
Primary — Municipal electrical utilities 


—Local systems 

— Interconnected systems, for resale 


— Rural operating areas 


— Direct industrial customers 




Total primary 


3,263,654,149 


3,170,548,366 

861,228 

133,920,000 


2.9 


Secondary — Interconnected systems, for resale 


—Direct industrial customers 


129.101.838 


3.7 


Total secondary 


129.101,838 

3,392,755,987 

375,619.444 


134,781,228 

3,305.329.594 

392.641.482 


4.4 
2.6 
4.5 


Total primary and secondary 


Losses and unaccounted for 


Total 


3.768.375,431 

495,306,036 
18,686.852 


3.697.971.076 

495.933.751 
20.926,083 


1.9 

0.1 
12.0 


NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

Primary— Municipal electrical utilities 


— Local systems 


— Interconnected systems, for resale 


— Rural operating areas 


80.860.767 
1.999,633.946 


93.818,812 
1.903.985,926 


16.0 

-4.5 


— Direct industrial customers 




Total primary 


2,594,487,601 
261,272,937 
318,655,629 


2,514,664,572 
456,255.968 
286,228,342 


3.1 
74.6 
10.2 


Secondary — Interconnected systems, for resale 

— Direct industrial customers 


Total secondary 


579.928,566 


742,484,310 


28.0 




Total primary and secondary 


3,174,416.167 
218.437,741 


3,257.148,882 
236,072,918 


2.6 
8.1 


Losses and unaccounted for 


Total 


3.392.853.908 

29,840,041,384 
4,714.805.404 
3.154.036.140 


3.493.221,800 

30,939,523,182 
4.054,757,818 
3,217.972,207 


3.0 
3.7 

n.o 
2.0 


All Systems 

Primary 


Secondary 


Losses and unaccounted for 




Total 


37.708.882,928 


38.212.253,207 


1.3 



106 



Appendix I — Operations 



ANALYSIS OF 
by the Commission and Associated 





Sales by 

utilities 

listed in 

Statement A 


Sales by The 




Through 

local 
systems 


Classes of ultimate customers served: 

Residential 

Hamlet and rural residential 


kwh 
7.276,262,491 


kwh 
123,765.593 
















7,276,262.491 
3,229,924,796 
7,976.367.874 


123,765,593 


Commercial 

Industrial power— primary 


59,194,738 
17.633.200 


Farm 








272.213,528 


2,864,740 






Total sales to ultimate customers served 


18,754,768,689 


203 458,271 


Delivered to interconnected systems for resale: 
Primary . , . 




Secondary 












Total sales to ultimate customers and for resale 


18,754,768,689 

852,609.632 

2U,726,593 

195,968,927 


203.458,271 


Adjustments: 

Losses and unaccounted for— municipal utilities 






Purchased by utilities listed in Statement A from sources 
other than the Commission 








Commission sales wholesale and retail . . 


19,196,682,801 


203,458,271 


Adjustment for losses and unaccounted for — Commission 


12,588,775 


♦Disposed of by the Commission in wholesale quantities 


19,196,682,801 


216,047.046 



*=This line gives the sums of the corresponding items shown on the preceding page for each of the three operating 
systems. The total of 34,994,281.000 kilowatt-hours plus transmission losses and unaccounted for amounting to 
3,217,972,207 kilowatt-hours equals the 38,212,253,207 kilowatt-hours shown as generated and purchased. 



Analysis of Energy Sales 



107 



ENERGY SALES 

Municipal Electrical Utilities during 1961 



Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 






In rural areas 


To direct 
industrial 
customers 


To interconnected 
systems for resale 


Tolal 


kwh 


kwh 


kwh 


kwh 

7,400.028.084 


1,096,653,000 






1,096,653,000 


74,693,800 






74,693,800 










1,171,346,800 






8.571,374,884 


324,871.900 






3,613,991,434 


354,069,300 


8,228,360,645 
420,148,342 




16,576.431,019 






420,148.342 


909,189,400 




909,189,400 


11,941,200 






287,019,468 










2,771.418,600 


8,648,508,987 




30,378,154.547 




351,995,374 
3,634,609,476 


351.995.374 






3,634.609.476 








2,771,418,600 


8,648,508,987 


3,986,604,850 


34.364.759.397 
852.609.632 









214,726,593 






195,968,927 










2,771.418.600 
175.018.716 


8.643.508.987 


3,986.604.850 


34.806.673,509 
187.607.491 


2,946,437.316 


8,643,508,987 


3,986,604,850 


34.994,231,000 



I 



APPENDIX II — FINANCIAL 

Table of Financial Statements 

Balance Sheets 

Southern Ontario System 26 

Northern Ontario Properties 28 

Statements of Operations 

Southern Ontario System 30 

Northern Ontario Properties 31 

Statement of Funded Debt 32 

Statement of Advances from the Province of Ontario 34 

Southern Ontario System 

Fixed Assets 110 

Accumulated Depreciation 114 

Frequency Standardization 115 

Exchange Discount (Net) on Funded Debt 115 

Reserves 

Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 116 

Sinking Fund 117 

Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 118 

Sinking Fund Equity 136 

Northern Ontario Properties 

Fixed Assets 144 

Accumulated Depreciation 148 

Frequency Standardization 148 

Exchange Discount (Net) on Funded Debt 148 

Reserves 

Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 149 

Sinking Fund 149 

Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 150 

Sinking Fund Equity 154 

109 



110 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

FIXED 
Statement Showing Changes during 





In 




Balance 

January 1, 

1961 


Changes 


Property 


Placed 

in 
service 


Transferred 

to "Under 

construction" 

(Note) 


Power System 

Hydro-electric Generating Stations 
Niagara River 

Sir Adam Beck-Niagara No. 1 


$ 

87,093,757 
311,282,519 

21,966,517 
11,547,825 

27,447,202 

291,254,873 

73,255,397 

58,171,384 

29,353,440 

8,563,817 

5,052,955 

12,449,466 

4,883,692 

20,466,951 


$ 

250,717 
80,700 


$ 

72,942 
3,349 


Sir Adam Beck-Niagara No. 2 

River R.emedial Works and Control Struc- 
ture 
Ontario Power 


Toronto Power 






Welland Canal 

DeCew Falls 


6,439 

8,300,069 

81,180 

17,515 

3,677 

90,117 




St. Lawrence River 

Robert H. Saunders — St. Lawrence 




Ottawa Ri\'er 

Des Joachims 




Otto Holden 

Chenaux 




Chats Falls 




Ogoki Diversion .... 




Madawaska River 

Stewartville . . 






Barrett Chute . .... 


4,151 
329,206 




Other properties . 


327,308 








962,789,795 


8,983,537 


403,599 


Thermal-electric Gener.\ting Stations 
J. Clark Keith 


46,449,744 
98,850,956 


3,995 
46,988,642 
38,750,000 




Richard L. Hearn 




Lakeview 




Douglas Point (Nuclear) 

— Ontario Hydro contribution 
Other properties 


625,147 












145,925,847 


85,742,637 








Total generating stations 


1,108,715,642 


94,726,174 


403,599 






Transformer Stations 
230-kv.. 


90,536,699 

107,592,536 

8,346,377 

26,965,576 


2,033,114 

7,006,829 

265,473 

782,383 


49,428 


Other — Niagara Division 


30,612 


— Georgian Bay Division 




— Eastern Ontario Division 








Total transformer stations 


233,441,188 


10,087,799 


80,040 






Transmission Lines 
230-kv 


103,485,915 

66,928,408 

8,863,160 

25,380,908 


9,474,591 

3,736,190 

450,730 

1,019,302 


393,531 


Other — Niagara Division . 


359,784 


— Georgian Bay Division . 




— Eastern Ontario Division . . 


4,334 






Total transmission lines. . . 


204,658,391 


14,680,813 


757,649 







Southern Ontario System — Fixed Assets 



111 



SYSTEM 

ASSETS 

Year 1961 and Balances at December 31, 1961 



service 


Under 

construction 

December 31, 

1961 


Total 

fixed assets 

December 31, 

1961 




during year 


Balance 

December 31, 

1961 




Equipment 
relocated 

and 
reclassified 


Sales 

and 

retirements 


Expenditures 

during 

1961 


$ 

15,975 
6,108,611 

6,038,606 


301,754 
48,065 


86,985,753 
305,203,194 

6,038,606 
21,966.517 
11,547,825 

27,453,653 

299,554,942 

73,453,950 

58,187,813 

29,354,577 

8,228,906 

5,052,955 

12,446,476 

4,879,670 

20,250,284 


$ 

149,767 
470,500 

1,406,206 
9,560 


$ 

87,135,520 
305,673,694 

7,444,812 
21,976,077 
11,547,825 

27,457,135 

299,911,512 

73,454,857 

58,188,521 

29,354,577 

8,263,713 

5,052,955 

12,471,630 

4,879,670 

21,802,639 


$ 

158,587 
98,962 

1,406,206 












891 


879 


3,482 

356,570 

907 
708 


5,278 

8,514,761 

34,537 

2,388 

284 


129,207 


11,834 

1,086 

2,540 

145,069 




99,725 


34,807 


88,825 




2,990 

1,871 

224,862 


25,154 


25 154 


6,302 


1 814 


6,297 


1,552,355 


1,386,176 


23,662 


740,950 


970,605,121 


4,010,016 


974,615,137 


11,545,322 


57,458 


619 
7,006 


46,395,662 

145,832,592 

38,750,000 


18,638 

627,475 

32,639,369 

1,215,755 

919,691 


46,414,300 

146,460,067 

71,389,369 

1,215,755 

1,540,027 


19,498 
6,502,753 




28,531,015 






578,594 




4,811 


620,336 


579,109 




57,458 


12,436 


231,598,590 


35,420,928 


267,019,518 


36,210,969 


81,120 


753,386 


1,202,203,711 


39,430,944 


1,241,634,655 


47,756,291 


2,958,516 
985,468 
964,370 
427,153 


51,960 

6,486,319 

81,668 

223,616 


95,530,851 

107,096.966 

7,565,812 

27,097,190 


1,961,138 

2,173,959 

261,549 

433,617 


97,491,999 

109,270,925 

7,827,361 

27,530,807 


1,912,175 

6,568,853 

483,580 

967,887 


581,525 


6,739,643 


237,290,829 


4,830,263 


242,121,092 


9,932,495 




572,034 

1,751,747 

184,683 

120,009 


111,994,941 

68,543,936 

9,182,785 

26,276,001 


1,862,474 

1,802,032 

180,921 

637,885 


113,857,415 

70,345,968 

9,363,706 

26,913,886 


4,525,344 


9,131 

53,578 

134 


2,384,449 
484,337 
852,141 


44,581 


2,628,473 


215,997,663 


4,483,312 


220,480,975 


8,246,271 



112 



ippi'inlix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN OMARIO 

KIXKl) 
Statement Showiiiji CUiaiij^es iluriii}^ 





In 




IviKuice 
January 1. 

i%i 


Changes 


Proporlv 


ri.ucd 

in 
ser\ ice 


IVansterreti 

to "Inder 

construction" 

(Note) 


Power System — (continued) 

CoMMl MCVriONS 


$ 

11,152.238 


$ 

341.240 


$ 






roial power s\ stem 


1,557.%7,459 


119.836.026 


1,241,2SS 


Administrative and Service I and, 
Huildiniis and Fquipment 

I..\Ni> ANO BriiniNcs 

Office ano Service Ei,n ipment 


2v\525.^ 74 
7.47(>.OOS 


3.591.177 
422.881 


70,528 






Total adininlstrati\e and service land, 
Inuldiuiis and eiiiiipnient 


.^1.001.^82 


4.014.058 


70.52S 


Retail Distribution 

RiRAi. l\nvi-K PisiKicr 


224,759,919 


15.903,257 








Lix-AL Systems 

Oeorjiian Rvi\ Oi\ ision 


42Q.280 


15,136 








lotvil retail distribntion 


225,189,199 


15,918.393 








1 OT \L l-i\FD \>sir>; 


1.S14.15S.O40 


130. 708.47 7 


1 311 v/<^ 







Changes in Assets under Construction during 1961 

Under construction vit Januar\ 1 . l^ol S 104,224.200 

Add: 

Transfer troni "in ser\ ice" at januar\ 1. l^ol (Xote) 1.311.810 

Ex^ienditures during 1%1 86.282,141 



Devluct: 

Placed in service durinti 19M 



S IQI.818.157 
13Q. 768.477 



Under construction at Oecetnber 31, 1^61 



52.049,680 



Soutlieni Ontario Svstein — Fixed Assets 



113 



SYSTEM 

ASSETS 

Year 1961 and Balances at December 31, 1961 



service 


Under 

construction 

December 31, 

1961 


Total 

fixed assets 

December 31, 

1961 




during Near 




Balance 

December 31, 

1961 




P3qLiipnienr 
relocated 

and 
reclassified 


Sales 

and 

retirements 


Elxpenditures 

during 

1961 


$ 
604,048 


s 

760,509 


S 
10,128,021 


$ 
407,830 


$ 
10,535,851 


$ 
422,957 


59,962 


10,882,011 


1,665,620,224 


49,152,349 


1,714,772,573 


66,358,014 


103,528 


368,434 
131,303 


26,781,717 
7,767,586 


1,176,869 


27,958,586 
^ 7.767,586 


3,509,131 
422,881 








103,528 


499,737 


34,549,303 


1,176,869 


35,726,172 


3,932,012 


44,515 


10,170,566 


230,448,095 


1,718,709 


232,166,804 


15,975,644 


949 


2,786 


442,579 


1,753 


444,332 


16,471 


43,566 


10,173,352 


230,890,674 


1,720,462 


232,611,136 


15,992,115 




21,555,100 


1,931,060,201 


52,049,680 


1,983,109,881 


86,282,141 







Summary of Sales and Retirements during 1961 

Charged to accumulated depreciation $ 10,758,621 

Charged to construction in progress 433,296 

Charged to operations 60,250 

Proceeds from sales 10,302,933 



21,555,100 



Xote: 

The costs of lands acquired and engineering surveys undertaken for proposed projects ha\e in 

prior years been classified as "in service" when incurred. The total of these costs in respect of plant 

not yet in service — 81,311,816 at January 1, 1961 — was transferred on that date to assets under 

construction. 



114 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 



ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION 
December 31, 1961 





Power 
System 


Rural Power 
District 


Administrative 

and service 

buildings and 

equipment 


Total 


Balances at January 1, 1961 .. . 
Add: 

Interest at 3% per annum 
on accumulated deprecia- 
tion on plant not fully 

depreciated 

Provision in the year 

—direct (Note 1) 

— indirect 


$ 
171,236,208 

4,514,318 

15,126,023 
11,624 

2,877,666 

86,938 


$ 
50,969,212 

1,511,841 
7,030,676 


$ 
7,668,659 

80,577 
892',800 


$ 
229,874,079 

6,106,736 

22,156,699 
904,424 


IVansfer from reserve for 
stabilization of rates and 
contingencies (Note 1) . . . 




2,877,666 


Adjustments re transfer of 
equipment. . . 


5,129 


81,809 










193,678,901 


59,516,858 


8,723,845 


261,919,604 


Deduct: 

Cost of fixed assets retired 
less proceeds from sales 
(Note 2) . 


6,015,868 
1,024,215 

204,061 
1,409 


4,826,290 


83,537 


10,758,621 


Frequency standardization 
costs (Note 2) 


1,024,215 


Excess of removal costs over 
salvage recoveries on assets 
retired 


101,650 
Q2I 


574 


306,285 


Other adjustments 


488 








7,245,553 


4,927,019 


82,963 


12,089,609 


Balances at December 31, 1961 


186,433,348 


54,589,839 


8,806,808 


249,829,995 



Notes: 

1. The transfer of $2,877,666 represents a retroactive adjustment to reflect revised estimated service lives for certain 
classes of assets indicated by studies of retirement experience completed during the year. The provision for 1961 is 
computed at revised rates determined from these studies. 

2. Accumulated depreciation for the Power System includes a special allowance for estimated capital losses and other 
costs in connection with 25-cycle equipment to be retired or converted as a result of frequency standardization. A 
summary of the charges against this special allowance in 1961 is noted below: 

Balance at January 1, 1961 $ 5,998,715 

Deduct charges in 1961: 

Losses incurred on the retirement of 25-cycle equipment 
(included above in "Cost of fixed assets retired less pro- 
ceeds from sales" ) $ 764,107 

Other frequency standardization costs 1,024,215 

— 1,788,322 

Balance at December 31, 1961 $ 4,210,393 



Southern Ontario System — Frequency Standardization 115 

SYSTEM 

FREQUENCY STANDARDIZATION ACCOUNT 
December 31, 1961 

Balance at January 1, 1961 $188,548,084 

Less portion of cost charged to cost of power lor the \car 9,683,567 

Balance at December 31, 1961 $178,864,517 



EXCHANGE DISCOUNT (NET) ON FUNDED DEBT 
December 31, 1961 





Discount 


Premium 


Net discount 


Exchange discount and premium on funded 
debt issued in United States funds: 
Balances at January 1, 1961 ... 


$ 

5,404,569 
19,564 


$ 

4,734,566 
17,666 


$ 
670,003 


Less discount and premium at time of issue 
on bonds redeemed during 1961 


1,898 


Balances at December 31, 1961 


5,385,005 


4,716,900 


668,105 







116 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENTS OF RESERVES, 

Stabilization of Rates 





Power 
System 


Rural Power 
District 


Balances at January 1, 1961 


$ 
122,207,139 

5,387,536 


2,511,208 
109,298 


Add: 

Interest for year on reserve balances (Note 1) 


Provision in the year 


Profit on redemption of funded debt and sale of invest- 
ments, net 


1,282,654 










128,877,329 


2,620,506 


Deduct: 

Expenditures during the year 






Withdrawals in the year applied in reduction of cost of 

power 

Excess of Rural Power District costs over revenue 


3,500,000 




330,874 


Transfer to accumulated depreciation (Note 2) .... 


2,877,666 




Transfer to accounts payable. ... . .... 




Miscellaneous charges. . , 


189,290 


40,098 








6,566,956 


370,972 


Balances at December 31, 1961 


122,310,373 


2,249,534 



NoiE 1: Interest on maximum power cost portion was calculated at 4%, and on the other portions of the reserve at a 
rate approximating actual earnings on the investments held for the reserves. 

Note 2: The transfer of $2,877,666 represents a retroactive adjustment to reflect revised estimated service lives for 
certain classes of assets indicated by studies of retirement experience completed during the year. 



Southern Ontario System — Statements of Reserves 117 

SYSTEM 

DECEMBER 31, 1961 
and Contingencies 





Portion of reserve earmarked for special purposes 




Sub-total 


Maximum 
power cost 


Municipal direct 
customers 


Nuclear 
research 


Total 


$ 
124,718,347 

5,496,834 


% 
461,032 

18,441 


$ 
394,519 

17,402 
664,775 


1,773,905 
61,167 


127,347,803 

5,593,844 
664,775 


1,282,654 






1,282,654 












131,497,835 


479,473 


1,076,696 


1,835,072 


134,889,076 








1,511,404 


1,511,404 


3,500,000 


18,441 




3,518,441 


330,874 






330,874 


2,877,666 








2,877,666 








323,668 


323,668 


229,388 






229,388 












6,937,928 


18,441 




1,835,072 


8,791,441 








124,559,907 


461,032 


1,076,696 




126,097,635 









Sinking Fund 





Power System 

and Rural 
Power District 


Administrative 

and service 

buildings and 

equipment 


Total 


Balances at January 1, 1961 


307,778,945 

12,311,158 

18,380,260 

5,864 


$ 
3,945,421 

157,817 


$ 
311,724,366 


Add: 

Interest at 4% per annum on reserve balances 
Provision in the vear — direct 


12,468,975 
18,380,260 


— indirect 


258,872 


264,736 




338,476,227 


4,362,110 


342,838,337 


Deduct credits resulting from matured sinking 
funds (Note): 
Interest 


2,512,378 
661,383 


45,335 
11,934 


2,557,713 


Principal 


673,317 








3,173,761 


57,269 


3,231,030 


Balances at December 31, 1961 . . . 


335,302,466 


4,304,841 


339,607,307 







Note: The matured sinking funds at January 1, 1961 amounted to $63,942,802. 



118 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 
zation 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig . . . 

Ajax 

Alexandria 

Alfred 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Alvinston 

Amherstburg. 
Ancaster Twp 

Apple Hill. . . . 

Arkona 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens 

Aurora 

Avonmore. . . . 

Aylmer 

Ayr 

Baden 

Bancroft 

Barrie 

Barry's Bay . . 

Bath 

Beachburg. . . . 

Beachville . . . . 

Beamsville 

Beaverton. . . . 

Beeton 

Belle River . . . 

Belleville 

Blenheim 

Bloomfield 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon . . 

Bolton 

Bothwell 

Bowmanville. 
Bracebridge. . 
Bradford . . . . 



kw 
3,865.9 

320.7 
5,864.7 
1,930.3 

482.9 

1,961.3 
1,630.9 
238.9 
3,004.7 
2,388.4 

87.5 

328.9 

4,014.3 

725.4 

395.3 

5,298.0 
166.3 

3,979.5 
670.5 
861.3 

1,249.2 

17,618.5 

360.8 

304.5 

322.2 

2,153.5 

1,369.6 

1,175.7 

423.1 

640.0 

21,685.1 

1,414.7 

402.0 

614.0 

731.0 

1,115.9 

366.0 

5,887.8 

84.5 

1,740.5 



megawatt- 
hours 
19,051.4 
1,394.4 
30,483.5 
9,339.0 
2,252.8 

11,023.6 

8,308.0 

956.6 

17,366.5 

11,668.2 

377.0 

1,542.1 

19,838.7 

3,201.6 

2,016.8 

28,740.8 
662.4 

19,946.7 
2,943.6 
3,329.0 

5,199.1 
94,893.8 
1,667.0 
1,462.6 
1,532.7 

13,580.4 
7,117.2 
5.312.8 
2.039.2 
3,105.6 

119,689.8 
6,740.0 
1,660.5 
2,898.8 
3,611.2 

5,831.6 

1.732.8 

29,928.5 

198.3 

9,141.6 



151,361 
13,449 

213.411 
81.859 
18.824 

87.613 
64,905 
10,049 
123,282 
90,072 

3,592 

13,989 

158,678 

30,213 

16,358 

202,996 
6,444 

146,592 
28,069 
31,191 

51,514 
632,020 
15.431 
12.848 
12.740 

84,304 
53,597 
49.533 
19.946 
27.634 

773.206 
56,768 
15,333 
26,164 
30.971 

47.606 

15,689 

213.979 

3,849 

72.059 



19.330 
1.603 



1,195 
15,023 
11,942 



1,645 



26,490 



19,898 
3,352 
4,306 



10,768 
6,848 



3,200 



7,074 
3,070 



5,579 
1,830 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



119 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 


Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 


Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 


Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 


Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 


Total cost 

of 

primary power 


Interim 


Actual 


$ 

J^,306 
3,581, 


$ 

163,247 
11,208 

208,650 
79,918 
18,432 

85,793 

63.581 

11.050 

134,330 

100.075 

3,499 

15.367 

155,419 

29,510 

16,037 

225,185 
6,309 

160.654 
29,015 
30,564 

50,500 
608,699 
15,138 
12,601 
12.478 

88,124 
59.333 
44.571 
19.453 
30.314 

755.603 
58,840 
15,007 
28.736 
30,378 

48,658 

13,493 

209,200 

3.780 

70,555 


166,234.78 
12.668.96 

212.595.07 
81,072.60 
18,231.05 

89,238.77 

61,157.53 

10,989.01 

138,215.05 

102,463.08 

3,437.13 

15,538.56 

156,559.35 

30.467.15 

16,207.99 

233,640.34 
6,487.04 

165,548.24 
29,635.76 
33,332.96 

.52.464.65 
634,266.00 
15,696.27 
12,543.32 
12,242.01 

95,183.97 
59,849.35 
48,203.71 
19,547.24 
30,528.03 

758,977.05 
61,679.46 
15.395.96 
29.013.48 
30,408.90 

49,992.32 

14,494.59 

209,016.31 

3,379.68 

72,055.01 


$ 

2,987.78 
1,1,60.96 
3,91,5.07 
1,15J,.60 
200.95 

3,1,1,5.77 
2,423.47 
60.99 
3,885.05 
2,388.08 

61.87 

1 71 .56 

1,11,0.35 

957.15 

1 70.99 

8,1,55.31, 
1 78.01, 

1„89U.21, 
620.76 

2,768.96 

1,96U.65 

25,567.00 

558.27 

57.68 

235.99 

7,059.97 
516.35 

3,632.71 

91,-21, 

2H.03 

3,371,-05 

2,839.1,6 

388.96 

277.1,8 

30.90 

1,331,-32 
996.59 
183.69 
400.32 

1,500.01 


$ 
43.00 
39.50 
36.25 
42.00 
37.75 

45.50 
37.50 
46.00 
46.00 
42.90 

39.30 
47.25 
39.00 
42.00 
41.00 

44.10 
39.00 
41.60 
44.20 
38.70 

42.00 
36.00 
43.50 
41.20 
38.00 

44.20 
43.70 
41.00 
46.20 
47.70 

35.00 
43.60 
38.30 
47.25 
41.60 

44.80 
39.60 
35.50 
40.00 
41.40 


$ 
42.23 
34.95 
35.58 


371, 


41.40 
38.17 


«* 


43.74 
38.99 




46.25 


1,536 


44.71 
41.90 


22 


39.99 

46.72 




38.72 


11', 


40.68 
40.57 




42.51 




37.94 


2,606 
1,862 
U,23f, 


40.38 
43.27 
35.48 

40.43 


9,019 


34.55 
41.96 




41.38 




38.73 


5,200 


40.93 
43.32 


J„007 
11,9 


37.91 
45.98 

47.37 




34.85 


3,851, 


41.60 
37.33 




46.80 




41.56 


3,621 
3,72 k 


43.61 
36.89 
35.53 




44.74 


91 


40.54 



120 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 
zation 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 



Braeside 

Brampton . . 

Brantford 

Brantford Twp 
Brechin 

Bridgeport 

Brigden 

Brighton 

Brockville .... 
Brussels 

Burfor J 

Burgessville. . . 
Burk's Falls . . 
Burlington. ... 
Caledonia .... 

Campbellford . 
Campbellville . 
Cannington. . . 

Cardinal 

Carleton Place 

Casselman. . . . 

Cayuga 

Chalk River . . 

Chatham 

Chatsworth . . . 

Chesley 

Chesterville. . . 
Chippawa .... 

Clifford 

Clinton 

Cobden 

Cobour^ 

Col borne 

Coldwater. . . . 
Collingwood . . 

Comber 

Cookstown . . . 

Cottam 

Courtright 

Creemore 



kw 

1.611.9 
13,794.9 
42,507.2 

5,723.7 
137.8 

797.3 

222.9 

1,397.6 

15,327.2 

611.2 

759.1 
198.4 
634.6 
29,538.4 
922.7 

1,050.0 
145.7 
600.4 
877.4 

2,990.4 

704.6 
425.8 
461.6 
19.920.3 
263.0 

1,167.2 
1,476.8 
1,235.0 
339.1 
2,179.9 

618.6 

9,217.1 

847.3 

521.0 

6,144.9 

292.6 
323.1 
248.1 
161.1 
483.1 



megawatt- 
hours 

6.488.7 

70,763.1 

223,507.3 

27,418.5 

597.0 

4.025.3 

989.6 

7,300.8 

80.332.0 

2,592.4 

3,380.5 

700.0 

2,907.6 

160,156.2 

4,928.0 

1,700.6 

665.8 

2,847.2 

4,401.4 

16,659.0 

2,972.8 
2,017.2 
2.387.7 
100,448.0 
1,134.0 

4,957.6 
6,937.0 
6,481.4 
1,712.8 
11,130.1 

2.942.4 

47,080.6 

4,407.8 

2,565.3 

29,283.0 

1,167.2 
1,451.6 
1,073.2 
731.6 
2,241.6 



$ 

55,536 

487,139 

1,482,623 

212,353 

5,870 

31.049 

9,405 

53,138 

532,928 

25,458 

29,034 

7,353 

26,691 

1,099,790 

36,632 

29,347 

5,897 

26,674 

35,695 

129,862 

29,104 
17,727 
17,957 
683,624 
11,516 

46,893 
61,349 
48.135 
14,594 
84.609 

23,008 

330,666 

37,492 

21,450 

237,289 

12.102 
13,575 
9,701 
6.577 
19,364 



68.975 

212,535 

28,618 



3,987 
1,114 



3,056 



3,796 
992 



147,692 
4,614 



728 



2,129 
99,602 



6,175 

1,695 

10,900 



1,463 



1,240 
806 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



121 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 



Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 



Total cost 

of 

primary power 



Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 



Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 



Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 



Interim 



Actual 



16, ISA 
7^,782 



1,983 



1,136 

17, on 



1,356 



5 

2,989 



U3,lt32 
553 

206 

3,698 

979 



U,326 



977 
13,151 



2,979 
98 



1,203 



54,228 

528,462 

1.585,870 

236,325 

3,775 

34,389 

9,202 

52,003 

503,472 

28,018 

30,858 

7,798 

26,176 

1,223,504 

38,906 

28,495 

6.502 

23,197 

34,983 

127,435 

28,532 
19,510 
17,582 
723,624 
10,749 

45,740 
56,452 
52,328 
16,014 
89,413 

22,506 

323,184 

36.804 

20,050 

219,150 

10,348 
13,215 
10,740 
7,252 
17,769 



$ 

54,403.05 

539,381.23 

1,640,777.60 

246,117.32 

4,272.84 

34,443.72 

9,449.53 

51.712.12 

511,927.92 

28,880.00 

31,653.78 

7,956.18 

28,365.51 

1,247,999.16 

39,214.04 

37,798.50 

6,628.23 

24,795.49 

35,972.04 

128,588.64 

29.241.61 
19.673.91 
18,139.91 
756,970.78 
10,966.07 

46,102.75 
56,857.44 
54,585.90 
16,004.35 
93,953.34 

22,270.80 

331.813.80 

36.095.37 

20,319.36 

225,517.83 

11,411.09 
14,861.06 
10,817.52 
7,348.06 
18,356.53 



1 75.05 

10,919.23 

5U,907.60 

9,792.32 

U97.8A. 

5U.72 

2U7.53 

290.88 

8,h55.92 

862.00 

795.78 

158.18 

2,189.51 

2i,A95.16 

308.0U 

9,303.50 
126.23 

1,598.^9 
9 89.0 A 

1,153.6A 

709.61 
163.91 
557.91 
33,3i6.78 
21 7.07 

362.75 
U05.U 

2,257.90 
9.65 

L5W.3U 

235.20 

8,629.80 

708.63 

269.36 

6,367.83 

1,063.09 

1,6A6.06 

77.52 

96.06 

587.53 



$ 
33.75 
39.10 
38.60 
43.00 
31.00 

43.20 
42.40 
37.00 
33.40 
47.25 

41.70 
40.10 
44.70 
42.25 
42 50 

36.00 
45.50 
41.30 
41.00 
43.00 

41.50 
46.20 
39.30 
38.00 
41.70 

39.50 
38.50 
44.20 
47.20 
43.10 

36.00 
36.00 
42.60 
39.00 
36.70 

39.00 
46.00 
43.60 
45.60 
38.00 



$ 
33.64 
38.31 
37.31 
41.29 
27.40 

43.13 
41.28 
37.21 
32.85 
45.84 

40.65 
39.30 
41.25 
41.42 
42.17 

27.14 
44.63 
38.64 
39.87 
42.62 

40.50 
45.82 
38.09 
36.33 
40.88 

39.19 
38.23 
42.38 
47.23 
41.02 

36.38 
35.07 
43.44 
38.48 
35.67 

35.37 
40.99 
43.29 
45.02 
36.78 



122 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 





Primary power and energy 










supplied during year 










(principal bases 






Cost of 




of cost allocation) 














Power 












purchased. 




Withdrawal 


Municipality 


Average of 




operating 
costs, and 


Frequency 


from 
stabilization 




monthly 




fixed 


standardi- 


of rates 




peak loads 


Energy 


charges 


zation 


reserve 



Dash wood 

Deep River. . . . 

Delaware 

Delhi 

Deseronto 

Dorchester. . . . 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Drumbo 

Dublin 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

Dutton 

East York Twp 

Eganville 

Elmira 

Elmvale 

Elmwood 

Elora 

Embro 

Erieau 

Erie Beach . . . . 
Erin 

Essex 

Etobicoke Twp. 

Exeter 

Fergus 

Finch 

Flesherton 

Fonthill 

Forest 

Forest Hill ... . 
Frank ford 

Gait 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Goderich 

Grand Bend . . . 



kw 

279.6 
3,404.0 

220.5 
2,314.8 

973.8 

404.6 
363.3 
1,408.7 
226.7 
251.6 

593.8 
8,230.6 
3,404.9 
1,526.5 

373.3 

33,815.3 

606.5 

3,810.7 

571.9 

188.5 

816.2 
366.9 
357.4 
62.2 
567.0 

1,513.3 

114.715.9 

2,155.6 

3,500.4 

274.2 

392.3 

1,120.1 

1,323.8 

13,341.4 

686.8 

23,806.8 

7,532.7 

551.7 

5.796.4 

774.5 



megawatt- 
hours 
1,054.8 
18,207.2 
928.4 
11.580.7 
5,021.8 

1,886.8 
1,544.2 
6,603.2 
958.4 
1.076.4 

2.599.2 

42,588.9 

17,019.3 

6.754.0 

1.761.8 

190.346.5 

2,903.2 

17,505.5 

2,844.8 

635.8 

3,741.4 
1.676.8 
1.772.8 
222.2 
2.688.0 

7.736.3 

674,711.9 

10.352.4 

15.211.4 

1.089.6 

1,518.4 
5,630.2 
7.652.0 
73,885.2 
3,512.7 

118,229.6 
41,688.6 

2.626.4 
29.611.5 

3,569.6 



11,510 

126.548 

8.864 

88.733 

42,293 

16,091 

14,548 

57.121 

9.629 

9,720 

26,685 

287,725 

135,142 

62,755 

17,679 

1,209.550 

24.232 

143.466 

24,396 

7,845 

35,359 
14,830 
14.998 
2.479 
23,812 

.58,076 

4.195,426 

91.466 

132.915 

1 1,099 

14.719 
44.140 
57.342 
472.283 
26,713 

811,821 
284,586 

23,703 
229,765 

32,456 



1,398 



1,102 
11,574 



2.023 
1,817 
7,043 
1,134 
1,258 



41,153 

17.024 



1,867 

169.076 

19,054 



4.081 

1.834 

1.787 

311 



7,567 

573,579 

10,778 

17,502 



5,601 

6,619 

66.707 



119.034 

37,663 

2,759 

28,982 

3,872 



227 
2,763 

179 
1,879 

790 

328 
295 
UtU 
18i. 
20U 

U82 
6,681 
2,76 U 
1,239 

303 

27,U50 

U92 

3,093 

153 

663 
298 
290 
50 
1,60 

1,228 

93,122 

1,750 

2,81,1 

223 

318 

909 

1.075 

10,830 

558 

1 9,325 
6,115 

U,705 
629 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



123 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 











Annual rates on 










a kilowatt basis 


primary power 














Amounts 
billed 








Credit 




for primary 








resulting 




power 


Balance 






from 


Total cost 


(municipalities 


credited 






matured 


of 


at interim 


or 






sinking fund 


primary power 


rates; 


charged 


Interim 


Actual 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




702 


11.979 


12,023.89 


U.89 


43.00 


42.85 




123,785 
9,401 


124,246.92 
9,656.46 


U61.92 
255.U6 


36.50 
43.80 


36.37 


386 


42.64 




98.428 
41,508 


101,620.10 
42,651 .73 


3,192.10 
1,1 US. 73 


43.90 
43.80 


42.52 




42.63 


633 


17,153 


18,006.56 


853.56 


44.50 


42.40 


739 


15.331 


15,692.40 


36140 


43.20 


42.20 


UU9 


58.871 


61,984.62 


3,113.62 


44.00 


41.79 


5UU 


10,035 


10,134.24 


99. 2U 


44.70 


44.26 


U02 


10,372 


10,140.50 


231.50 


40.30 


41.22 


1.525 


24.678 


25,237.56 


559.56 


42.50 


41.56 


18,^)85 


303.212 


320,991.48 


1 7,779. U8 


39.00 


36.84 


3,633 


145,769 


151,518.43 


5,7U9.U3 


44.50 


42.81 


2,909 


58,517 


59.228.84 


711.8U 


38.80 


38.34 


2,398 


16.845 


17,395.40 


550.U0 


46.60 


45.13 




1,351.176 


1,349.231.13 


1,944.87 


39.90 


39.96 




23.740 


24,139.04 


399.0U 


39.80 


39.14 


6,352 


153,075 


161,574.74 


8,U99.7U 


42.40 


40.17 


1,751 


22,181 


22,875.35 


69U.35 


40.00 


38.79 


h6 


7,646 


7,802.52 


156.52 


41.40 


40.57 


h,5k2 


34,235 


34,851.04 


616.0U 


42.70 


41.95 


1,519 


14,847 


15,408.40 


561 .kO 


42.00 


40.47 




16,495 


16,441.55 


53.45 


46.00 


46.15 




2,740 


2,785.31 


h5.31 


44.75 


44.05 




23,352 


23.927.38 


575.38 


42.20 


41.19 


886 


63.529 


65,523.73 


l,99h.73 


43.30 


41.98 


5,118 


4,670,765 


4,760,709.51 


89,9U.51 


41.50 


40.72 


2,581 


97,913 


98,079.06 


166.06 


45.50 


45.42 


U,302 


143,274 


147,718.63 


U.UU.63 


42.20 


40.93 




10,876 


11,186.34 


310.3 U 


40.80 


39.67 


8U2 


13,559 


14,280.02 


721,02 


36.40 


34.56 




48,832 
61,156 


48,445.76 
64,071 .52 


386.24 
2,915.52 


43.25 
48.40 


43.60 


1,730 


46.20 




528,160 


538,993.23 


10,833.23 


40.40 


39.59 




26,155 
863,455 


25,000.74 
899,895.80 


1,154.26 
36,U0.80 


36.40 
37.80 


38.08 


U8,075 


36.27 


12,286 


303,848 


317,878.54 


U,030.5U 


42.20 


40.34 


1,026 


24,988 


25,820.34 


832.3U 


46.80 


45.29 


13,1 kl 


240,901 


249,244.48 


8,3U3.U8 


43.00 


41.56 


7 


35,692 


35,935.63 


2U3.63 


46.40 


46.10 



124 



Appentlix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary' power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation ) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 
zation 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
o( rates 
reserve 



Grand Valley . . 

Granton 

Gravenhurst . . . 

Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hagersville . . . . 

Hamilton 

Hanover 

Harriston 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Havelock 

Hawkesbury . . . 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Highgate 

Holstein 

Huntsville 

Ingersoll 

Iroquois 

Jarvis 

KemptvUle . . . . 
Killaloe Station 
Kincardine . . . . 
Kingston 

Kingsville 

Kirkfield 

Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lambeth 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Leamington . . . 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

London 

Long Branch. . . 

L'Orignal 

Lucan 

Lucknow 



kw 

474.3 

105.7 

2,389.1 

2,651.1 

34,098.3 

1,606.3 
331,542.8 
3,937.1 
1,200.8 
1,264.0 

441.1 
540.7 

3,161.9 
743.4 

5,504.8 

196.1 

117.2 

2,263.7 

5,340.5 

748.5 

353.9 
1,600.8 

269.9 

2,135.1 

38,651.6 

1,699.5 

87.6 

67.785.9 

1,313.8 

908.7 

336.5 

264.4 

5,901.7 

8,426.9 

3,148.9 

103,450.4 

6,335.3 

373.3 

553.2 

695.5 



megawatt- 
hours 
1,944.6 
457.8 
12,112.4 
14,234.0 
180,915.1 

6,407.5 

2,130.850.1 

16,993.5 

6,227.8 

6,321.6 

2,164.8 
2,754.4 

16,847.2 
3,409.6 

27,193.0 

720.4 

431.4 

12,605.9 

25,875.8 

3,774.7 

1,632.0 

7,791.1 

1,300.5 

11,260 6 

219,908.3 

8,438.3 

373.4 

352,105.7 

6,328.8 

4,107.3 

1,608.6 

1,270.8 

31,257.6 

48.419.6 

14,911.6 

599,850.6 

35,501.6 

1,815.8 

2,606.4 

3.256.0 



20.363 

4,304 

95,370 

106,697 

1,175,857 

62,788 

12,243,152 

142,802 

49.400 

53.076 

17,598 
22,173 

110,706 
30,847 

195.619 

7,987 

4,813 

94,617 

202,062 

28,701 

14,729 
68,102 
11,454 
93,947 
1,381,150 

65,093 

3,755 

2.148,288 

49,349 

36,087 

13,704 

10,923 

232.522 

348,175 

118,716 

3,717.506 

237.750 

14,054 

23,792 

30,212 



529 



13,255 
170,492 



8,031 
1,408,014 



6,004 
6,320 



3,717 
27,524 



981 



26,702 



1,770 



8,497 

338,930 

4,543 



29,509 

15,744 

517,252 
31,677 



2,766 



1,939 

2,152 

27,6S0 

1,30U 

269,133 

3,196 

975 

1,026 

358 
U39 

2,567 
603 

lt,U69 

159 

95 

1,838 

L335 

608 

287 
1,299 

219 

1,733 

31,376 

1,380 

71 

55,026 

1,066 

738 

273 

215 

^,791 

6,8U1 

2,556 

83,977 

5,H3 

303 

U9 

565 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



125 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 


Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 


Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 


Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 


Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 


Total cost 

of 

primary power 


Interim 


Actual 



I 



$ 

5A 

665 

1,907 


$ 

19,924 

4,082 

91,524 

117,800 

1,253,470 

62,222 

13,107,397 

138,719 

51,356 

58,074 

17,240 
21,734 

108,139 
33,178 

211.896 

8,151 
4,710 

92,779 
206,350 

28,093 

16,212 
66,803 
11,235 
92,165 
1,349,774 

71,253 

3,359 

2,323,025 

48,283 

39,030 

13,431 

10,684 

256,112 

341,334 

125,012 

3,912,769 

264,284 

13,751 

21,873 

29,613 


$ 

20,395.61 

4,100.85 

94,609.02 

120,094.84 

1,261,636.17 

65,055.52 

13,328,019.59 

139,765.90 

50,795.26 

58,774.48 

17,643.66 
22,440.79 

109,719.39 
33,453.00 

219,642.21 

8,039.43 
4,982.77 

95,982.64 
222,163.07 

28,444.60 

16,669.10 
67,714.56 
11,200.53 
95,437.12 
1,348,939.69 

72,057 76 

3,634.72 

2,440,293.00 

46,244.00 

39,620.41 

13,628.60 

11,050.18 

264,395.79 

342,133.84 

129,733.64 

4,075,946.43 

262,916.34 

15,678.25 

24,507.91 

30,601.62 


$ 
k71.61 
18.85 
3,085,02 
2,29k.8k 
8,166.17 

2,833.52 

220,622.59 

l,0h6.90 

560.74 

700.1^8 

U03.66 

706.79 

1,580.39 

275.00 

7,7U6.21 

111.57 

272.77 

3,203.6U 

15,813.07 

351.60 

A57.10 

911.56 

34.47 

3,272.12 
834.31 

80^.76 

275.72 

117,268.00 

2,039.00 

590.U 

197.60 
366.18 

8,283.79 
799.8U 

U,72l.6U 

163,177. h3 

1,367.66 

1,927.25 

2,63U.91 

988.62 


$ 
43.00 
38.80 
39.60 
45.30 
37.00 

40.50 
40.20 
35.50 
42.30 
46.50 

40.00 
41.50 
34.70 
45.00 
39.90 

41.00 
42.50 
42.40 
41.60 
38.00 

47.10 
42.30 
41.50 
44.70 
34.90 

42.40 
41.50 
36.00 
35.20 
43.60 

40.50 
41.80 
44.80 
40.60 
41.20 

39.40 
41.50 
42.00 
44.30 
44.00 


$ 
42.01 
38.62 
38.31 
44.44 


65,199 

7,293 

271^,636 

887 

3,073 

296 


36.76 

38.74 
39.54 
35.24 
42.77 
45.95 

39.09 
40.20 




34.20 


783 
6,778 

658 

8 


44.63 
38.50 

41.56 
40.19 
40.99 


18,079 


38.64 
37.53 




45.81 




41.73 




41.63 


U9 


43.17 
34.92 


957 

325 

109,167 


41.93 
38.35 
34.27 
36.75 


862 


42.95 
39.92 


2h 
1,128 


40.41 
43.40 
40.51 


6,892 
238,012 


39.70 

37.82 
41.72 




36.84 


h,236 
3h 


39.54 
42.58 



126 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 



Lynden 

Madoc 

Magnetawan. . . . 

Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora 

Mariintown. . . . 

Maxville 

Meaford 

Merlin 

Merrickville .... 

Midland 

Mildmay 

Mill brook 

Milton 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Moorefield 

Morrisburg 

Mount Brydges . 
Mount Forest. . . 

Napanee 

Neustadt 

Newboro 

Newburgh 

Newbury 

Newcastle , 

New Hamburg. . 
Newmarket 

New Toronto . . . 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls . . . 
North York Twp 
Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Oil Springs 

Omemee 

Orangeville 



kw 

287.1 

859.7 

83.4 

731.4 

2,759.8 

700.8 
162.8 
449.1 
2,832.4 
290.1 

438.5 

8,152.4 

467.8 

444.0 

3.756.0 

842.3 
8,386.8 
1.920.7 

258.1 
1,276.7 

360.3 

1,968.5 

3,296.2 

281.0 

103.6 

248.0 

112.6 

848.5 

1,340.9 

6,486.9 

27,419.5 

1,582.3 

16,020.2 

164.646.3 

863.4 

607.9 

32,888.3 

2.53.0 

379.5 

3,237.7 



megawatt- 
hours 
1,322.3 
4,317.6 
375.6 
3..335.6 
13.438.5 

3,458.4 

632.7 

1,865.0 

14,160.9 

1,366.4 

2,189.9 

41,876.3 

2,197.0 

2.075.8 

20,054.3 

3,411.2 
46,159.9 
9,416.1 
1,053.2 
6,512.0 

1,599.6 

9.057.6 

16.285.8 

1,096.9 

433.7 

1.117.2 

520.6 

4.0842 

6.364.0 

33,587.5 

150.872.9 

8,732.0 

88,837.6 

938,033.9 
4.441.0 

2,867 2 

202.99:^.4 

1.533.2 

1.911.1 

16.242 5 



11.619 

37,063 

3,642 

30,081 

109,161 

29,503 

6,268 

20.144 

121.902 

11,885 

17,743 

308,048 

19,153 

19,650 

149,536 

35,035 

302,606 

73,828 

10,022 

48,767 

14,313 

80,752 

135,023 

10.706 

3,976 

10,487 

4.816 

31,723 

54,803 

240,208 

996,648 
62.232 

573,128 

5,974.738 

37.201 

24,638 

1,258,048 

11,522 

16,819 

138,375 



1.435 



13,799 



1,451 



18,780 

4,211 

41,934 

9,604 

1,290 



1,802 



563 



6.704 
32,435 

137,097 

7.912 

80,101 

823,231 

4,317 



164,442 
1,265 



233 

698 

68 

59U 

2,2U0 

569 

132 

365 

2,299 

235 

356 

6,618 

380 

360 

3,01^9 

68^ 
6,808 
1,559 

210 
1,036 

292 
1,598 
2,676 

228 
8^ 

201 
91 

689 
1,088 
5,266 

22.258 

l,281f 

13,005 

133,653 

701 

U93 

26,697 

205 

308 

2,628 



Southern Ontario System — Coat of Primary Power 



127 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



* 



primary power 


Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 


Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 


Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 


Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 


Total cost 

of 

primary power 


Interim 


Actual 


$ 

2,566 


$ 

10,255 

36,365 

3,574 

29,414 

119.950 

28,934 

6,123 

19,703 

119.603 

13,101 

17,387 

288,660 

18,773 

19,290 

152,246 

34,555 
330,594 
77,841 
10,698 
47,731 

14,982 

75,202 

132,347 

10,370 

3,892 

10,286 

5,126 

31,034 

55,686 

267,373 

1,057,529 

66,224 

588,709 

6,664,313 
35,471 

24,145 

1,395.793 

10,856 

16,511 

135,626 


$ 

10,994.66 

36,710.65 

3,719.29 

30,938.95 

123,639.79 

29,433.25 

6,155.13 

19,986.80 

125,190.25 

13,114.04 

17,977.14 

293,485.20 

18,711.67 

19,091.29 

? 58,880.23 

34,198.06 
339,666.09 
81,435.56 
10,944.87 
48.514.28 

15.602.45 

78.346.65 

135,968.95 

10,875.02 

3,863.05 

10,290.62 

5,098.52 

31,054.22 

56,852.75 

269,204.29 

1.113.231.37 

69,622.29 

624,788.79 

6,775,196.59 
36,955.31 

27,507.85 

1,401,043.01 

10,624.95 

16,319.93 

138,412.75 


739.66 

3U5.65 

H5.29 

1,52A.95 

3,689.79 

A99.25 

32.13 

283.80 

5,587.25 

13. OU 

590.1 U 

U,825.20 

61.33 

198.71 
6,631,.23 

356.94 

9,072.09 

3,59I,.56 

21,6.87 

783.28 

620.1,5 
3,1J,I,.65 
3,621.95 

505.02 
28.95 

1,-62 

27.48 

20.22 

1,166.75 

1,831.29 

55,702.37 

3,398.29 

36,079.79 

110,883.59 

1,U8!,.31 

3,362.85 

5,250.01 

231.05 

191.07 

2,786.75 


$ 
38.30 
42.70 
44.60 
42.30 
44.80 

42.00 
37.80 
44.50 
44.20 
45.20 

41.00 
36.00 
40.00 
43.00 
42.30 

40.60 
40.50 
42.40 
42.40 
38.00 

43.30 
39.80 
41.25 
38.70 
37.30 

41.50 
45.30 
36.60 
42.40 
41.50 

40.60 
44.00 
39.00 
41.15 
42.80 

45.25 
42.60 
42.00 
43.00 
42.75 


$ 
35.72 
42.30 




42.86 


73 
770 


40.22 
43.46 

41.29 


13 
76 


37.61 
43.87 
42.23 




45.16 




39.65 


12,770 


35.41 
40.13 




43.45 


13,021 

h.007 
7,138 
U,032 


40.53 

41.02 
39.42 
40.53 
41.45 
37.39 


8U1 
3,952 


41.59 
38.20 
40.15 


108 


36.91 
37.57 




41.48 


162 


45.52 
36.58 


h,733 

53,958 

2,636 

51,515 

3 

5,31,6 


41.53 
41.22 

38.57 
41.85 
36.75 
40.47 
41.09 

39.72 




42.44 


1,726 


42.91 
43.51 


121 


41.89 



128 



Appendix 11 — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 
zation 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 



Orillia 

Orono 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Penetanguishene 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Petrolia 

Petrolia Water Works 

Pickering 

Picton 

Plattsville 

Point Edward 

Port Burwell 

Port Colbome 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port McNicoll 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley 

Prescott 

Preston 

Priceville 

Princeton 

Queenston 

Renfrew 

Richmond 

Richmond Hill 

Ridge town 

Ripley 

Riverside 



kw 

5.177.5 

506.8 

66,179.3 

161.775.3 

390.6 

11.784.3 

446.0 

1.098.3 

3.396.5 

844.1 

2.174.6 
2.644.5 
4.008.3 
36.362.8 
1,583.7 
150.2 

832.0 
3,506.6 

634.4 
4,187 1 

243.1 

5,721.4 
11,525.0 
2,024.0 
1,147.1 
7,515.6 

1,096.9 

1,293.4 

249.6 

996.1 

3,276.3 

8,523.2 

48.6 

242.3 

354.5 

4,137.5 

592.7 
9,104.2 
1,356.8 

306.7 
6.478.1 



megawatt- 
hours 
25,547.7 
2.341.5 
352,908.4 
880,292.9 
1.809.2 

59.932.9 
2,092.4 
5.551.5 

16,400.0 
4,052.0 

12,908.9 

14,417.7 

18.413.6 

215,755.8 

8,018.8 

704.5 

4,340.4 
18,398.0 

2,668.8 
17.469.2 

1,092.4 

31,456.9 
78,744.2 
11.087.0 
6,038.6 
39.527.4 

3,606.8 
6.256.8 
1.295.9 
5.117.6 
16.442.3 

43,318.5 

201.2 

1,131.0 

1,871.1 

19,305.1 

2,900.4 

46.736.3 

6,366.3 

1,311.2 

29,651.4 



$ 

213.974 

20.014 

2,272,576 

5,669.404 

15,170 

434.196 
17.864 
37.985 

119.291 
36.109 

93.180 

105,465 

158.977 

1.349.014 

68,828 

5,911 

32.560 
140.597 

24.507 
144.064 

10,095 

218,537 

460,287 

78,395 

51,760 

266,000 

39,927 
55,758 
10,567 
43,194 
133,244 

299.657 

2.009 

10.028 

13.601 

160,805 

21,780 

356,512 

57,488 

13,033 

235,001 



1,953 



5,492 
16.982 
4.220 



7,919 
751 



3,172 

20,935 

1,216 

28,607 
57,625 
10,120 



1.248 
4.980 



42,616 



1,212 
1,772 



45,521 
6,784 



32,391 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



129 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 



Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 



Total cost 

of 

primary power 



Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 



Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 



Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 



Interim 



Actual 



535 



20,932 



,752 



ll,t 



78A 



8,171 



,521t. 



828 

2,A69 

16 



2,163 



UA 



U,683 
3,252 

27, US 

3 

6A3 

288 



33 



209.771 

19,603 

2,218,854 

5,538,036 

16,271 

403,698 
17,502 
39,833 

121,620 
38,860 

91,415 
95,147 
155,723 
1,319,496 
66,937 
6,540 

31,885 
137,750 

26,336 
159,131 

11,098 

242,500 

506,393 

86,872 

50,829 

259,899 

38,593 
54,708 
11,612 
42,682 
127,332 

307,911 

1,967 

10,400 

14,797 

157,446 

21,299 

394,643 

58,525 

12,751 

262,133 



206,063.20 

19,765.23 

2,289,804.93 

5,532,714.16 

16,250.70 

421,877.65 
17,884.62 
41,074.57 

128,726.10 
39,166.25 

93,940.56 

95,200.20 

159,127.88 

1,309,061.10 

65,722.17 

6,669.23 

32,448.67 
138,511.04 

27,023.70 
166,436.23 

11,304.54 

243,161.27 

530,151.92 

88,247.12 

51,904.02 

270,563.10 

38,720.56 
56,002.43 
11,531.54 
44,723.38 
127,776.72 

328,141.60 

2,129.80 

10,369.02 

15,244.60 

159,293.45 

21,691.60 

410,598.67 

60,377.99 

13,402.44 

279,851.76 



$ 
3,707.80 

1 62.23 

70,950.93 

5,321.84 

20.30 

18,179.65 

382.62 

1,2U1.57 

7,106.10 

306.25 

2,525.56 

53.20 

3,WA-88 

10,434.90 

1,214.83 

129.23 

563.67 
761 .OU 
687.70 
7.305.23 
206.5U 

661.27 

23,758.92 

1,375.12 

1,075.02 

10,66^.10 

127.56 

1,29^.U3 

80.46 

2,01^1.38 

hhh-72 

20,230.60 

162.80 

30.98 

Uk7.60 

I,8h7.h5 

392.60 

15,955.67 

1,852.99 

651 .U 
17.718.76 



$ 
39.80 
39.00 
34.60 
34.20 
41.60 

35.80 
40.10 
37.40 
37.90 
46.40 

43.20 
36.00 
39.70 
36.00 
41.50 
44.40 

39.00 
39.50 
42.60 
39.75 
46.50 

42.50 
46.00 
43.60 
45.25 
36.00 

35.30 
43.30 
46.20 
44.90 
39.00 

38.50 
43.80 
42.80 
43.00 
38.50 

36.60 
45.10 
44.50 
43.70 
43.20 



40.52 
38.68 
33.53 
34.23 
41.66 

34.26 
39.24 
36.27 
35.81 
46.04 

42.04 
35.98 
38.85 
36.29 
42.27 
43.54 

38.32 
39.28 
41.51 
38.01 
45.65 

42.39 
43.94 
42.92 
44.31 
34.58 

35.19 
42.30 
46.53 
42.85 
38.87 

36.13 
40.47 
42.93 
41.75 
38.06 

35.94 
43 35 
43.14 
41.57 
40.47 



i 



130 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 



Rockland 

Rock wood 

Rodney 

Rosseau 

Russell 

St. Catharines 

St. Clair Beach 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sandwich East Twp. 
Sandwich West Twp 

Sarnia 

Scarborough Twp. . . 

Seaforth 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls 

Smithville 

Southampton 

Springfield 

Stamford Twp 

Stayner 

Stirling 

Stoney Creek 

Stouffville 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville 

Sunderland 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Swansea 

Tara 

Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Teeswater 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 



kw 
990.7 
399.2 
485.8 
105.8 
297.1 

72,697.7 

582.4 

464.4 

498.9 

9,333.5 

15,105.2 
6,218.8 

11,308.4 
128,094.2 
132,303.7 

1.627.4 

849.9 

7.245.2 

7.078.7 

554.7 

1.085.1 

232.1 

15,559.7 

993.0 

915.5 

3,470.1 
1,918.3 
15,728.0 
3,457.4 
2.937.4 

408.4 
333.0 
973.6 
5.791.8 
447.6 

789.5 
1.297.1 
683.6 
731.4 
718.9 



megawatt - 
hours 
4.932.2 
1.938.4 
2,314.4 
465.6 
1.349.3 

397.425.9 

2,790.5 

2,279.3 

1,976 8 

64,153.9 

83,497.3 

31.981.0 

57,296.9 

1.026.189.8 

710,374.0 

7,576.4 

3,906.0 

39,288.1 

35.359.8 

2.558.6 

5,886.8 

957.2 

85,229.0 

4,896.0 

4,190.5 

17,359.2 
8,919.7 
83,012.1 
18,030.6 
15,050.5 

1,844.8 
1,683.8 
5,076.8 
34.097.3 
2.124.4 

4.018.2 
6.542.0 
3.133.2 
3,674.4 
3,013.5 



37,412 
18,179 
20.142 
4.574 
10,981 

2,570,311 

22,538 

18,769 

21.462 

358.746 

533,285 

223,107 

417,747 

5,152,286 

4,716,872 

55,324 

37,356 

259,899 

248,271 

22,972 

49.845 

8.496 

557.413 

38.552 

32,969 

132,501 
78.300 
546,173 
121.170 
109.966 

17.233 
14.598 
41,635 
213,404 
18,760 

32,684 
50,639 
29,900 
31,958 
30,709 



1,996 
2,429 



363,488 

2,912 

2,322 

2,495 

46,667 

75,526 

31,094 

56,542 

640,471 

661,519 

8,137 



36,226 


2,773 


1.161 
77,798 





17,351 
9.591 
78.640 
17,287 
14,687 



4,868 
28,959 



3,948 
6,485 



3,657 
3,595 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



131 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 




Amounts 










billed 


Credit 




for primary 


resulting 




power 


from 


Total cost 


(municipalities 


matured 


of 


at interim 


sinking fund 


primary power 


rates) 



Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 



Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 



Interim 



Actual 



1,^86 
89U 



1,821 

1,08k 

18,052 

13,331 



38,927 
2,U8 

8,829 

152 

U,635 



529 
6,3U5 
1,710 



Ul,916 
9,180 



2,k3U 



35 
i,910 



52 
2,360 

1,853 



36.608 
18,365 
21,283 
4,488 
10.740 

2,874,786 

24,977 

18.893 

22,468 

379,784 

553,218 

249,153 

465,109 

5,649,849 

5,268.544 

53.311 

36,514 

285,609 

242,525 

25,295 

48,964 

8,940 

616,235 

36,036 

32,226 

147.035 
86,334 
570,130 
126,470 
122,269 

14,467 
14,328 
45,713 
237,661 
18,362 

32,081 
56,071 
29,293 
32,671 
31,867 



36,061.80 
18,442,68 
21.472.37 
4.506.05 
10.786.26 

2,922,449.22 

25,219.35 

19,598.38 

22,899.52 

394,807.06 

593,633.71 

266,787.96 

482,869.40 

5.668.169.83 

5.411.221.34 

58.587.90 

37,396.35 

293,429.95 

243,506.12 

25,016.22 

49,373.93 

9,516.09 

629,389.17 

37,038.29 

32,957.70 

151,294.54 
87,857.78 
592,944.04 
133.799.76 
125.428.77 

16.170.99 
14.983.13 
45,761.16 
242,676.42 
18,576.11 

33,159.35 
56,811.91 
30,216.97 
33.423.09 
32,565.43 



546.20 
77.68 

189.37 
18.05 
1^6.26 

U7,663.22 
2^2.35 
705.38 
U31 .52 

15,023.06 

JfO, 415.71 
1 7,63U-96 
17,760.U0 
18,320.83 
1U2,677.3U 

5,276.90 
882.35 

7,820.95 
981.12 
278.78 

W9.93 

576.09 

13,15^.17 

1,002.29 

731.70 

lt,259.5U 
1,523.78 
22,8nM 
7,329.76 
3,159.77 

1,703.99 

655.13 

U8.16 

5,015.^2 
21U.11 

1,078.35 
7U0.91 
923.97 
752.09 
698. A3 



36.40 
46.20 
44.20 
42.60 
36.30 

40.20 
43.30 
42.20 
45.90 
42.30 

39.30 
42.90 
42.70 
44.25 
40.90 

36.00 
44.00 
40.50 
34.40 
45.10 

45.50 
41.00 
40.45 
37.30 
36.00 

43.60 
45.80 
37.70 
38.70 
42.70 

39.60 
45.00 
47.00 
41.90 
41.50 

42.00 
43.80 
44.20 
45.70 
45.30 



$ 
36.95 
46.01 
43.81 
42.42 
36.15 

39.55 
42.89 
40.69 
45.04 
40.70 

36.62 
40.07 
41.13 
44.11 
39.82 

32.76 
42.96 
39.42 
34.26 
45.60 

45.13 
38.51 
39.60 
36.29 
35.20 

42.37 
45.01 
36.25 
36.58 
41.63 

35.43 
43.03 
46.S5 
41.04 
41.02 

40.64 
43.23 
42.85 
44.67 
44.33 



132 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipality- 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



Energy 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



Frequency 
standardi- 



Withdrawal 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 



Thcdford. . 
Thornbury 
Thorndale. 
Thornton. . 
Thorold. . . 



Tilbury 

Tillsonburg. . , 

Toronto 

Toronto Twp. 
Tottenham . . 



Trenton 

Tweed 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill... 
Victoria Harbour. 



Walkerton. . . . 
Wallaceburg . . 
Wardsville. . . . , 
Warkworth. . . 
Wasaga Beach 

Waterdown. . . 
Waterford. . . . 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Waubaushene. 



Welland. . . . 
Wellesley. . . 
Wellington . 
West Lome. 
Weston 



Westport. . . . 
Wheatley. . . . 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Williamsburg . 

Winchester. . 
Windermere . 

Windsor 

Wingham 

Woodbridge . . 



Woodville . 
Woodstock . 
Wyoming. . 
York Twp. . 
Zurich 



kw 
430.8 
842.3 
239.9 
120.2 
11,529.3 

1.320.1 

5,026.9 

585,156.3 

49,757.6 

385.6 

14,866.7 

1,123.1 

1,614.0 

605.4 

358.8 

2.904.1 

7,392.6 

170.1 

280.2 

736.6 

966.0 

988.4 

16.765.2 

1.247.3 

319.4 

20.321.8 

409.7 

564.2 

965.4 

8.531.7 

361.2 

794.9 

10.779.8 

1.242.1 

228.9 

1,165.3 

133.6 

75.903.4 

2,267.5 

1,948.2 

197.4 
17,242.5 

375.1 
59,113.6 

398.5 



megawatt- 
hours 
2,125,2 
4,159.2 
940.4 
511.6 
70,349.5 

5,816.4 

24,723.2 

3,473,609.7 

326,034.3 

1,927.6 

89,998.7 
5,155.3 
7,939.2 
2,805.2 
1,628.8 

12,506.3 

42,364.3 

797.8 

1,141.6 

2.721.6 

4.885.3 
4.598.8 
90,306.3 
5,631.4 
1,445.6 

106,811.3 

1,676.8 

2,505.4 

4.159.2 

46,001.3 

1,755.2 

3.449.6 

58,131.1 

6,528.0 

981.8 

6,230.2 

562.2 

391.393.7 

11.481.7 

9,938.9 

894.8 

97.425.6 

1.768.4 

345.523.7 

1,765.2 



$ 

18,570 

36,526 

9.544 

4.746 

423,265 

55,027 

170,872 

20,979,730 

1.922,115 

16,913 

540,821 
42.872 
70,375 
22,807 
15,620 

103,970 

269.921 

7.259 

10.808 

28,528 

36.408 
38,763 
537,735 
51,975 
13,841 

717,829 
16,024 
24,684 
40,306 

308,258 

14,545 

33,321 

379,687 

55,058 

9,740 

49,674 

5,433 

2,626,503 

92.285 

77.807 

8.800 

611.856 

16.091 

2.114.415 

16,937 



2.154 



1,199 



57.647 

6.600 

25,135 

2.925.781 

248.788 



36.963 
851 



4.830 

4,942 

83,826 

6,236 



101,609 
2,049 



4,827 
42.658 



3.975 



379,517 
9.741 



86,212 

1,876 

295,568 

1,992 



350 

68U 

195 

98 

9,359 

1,072 

4,081 

Jt75,00U 

40,391 

313 



12,068 

912 

1,310 

491 

291 

2,357 

6,001 

138 

227 
598 

784 

802 

13,609 

1,013 

259 

16,496 

333 

458 

784 

6,926 

293 

645 

8,751 

1,008 

186 

947 

108 

61,615 

1,841 

1,581 

160 
13,997 

304 
47,986 

323 



Total — Municipalities. 



3,184.764.2 



18.291,018.0 



116,046,697 



12,715,215 



,585,257 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



133 



SYSTEM 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 



Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 



Total cost 

of 

primary power 



Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 



Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 



Annual rates on 
a kilowatt basis 



Interim 



Actual 



1,^99 
21 



3,U57 

8,686 

937,380 

U,585 

60 



706 



16,212 
39 



2,551 

2,558 

22.657 

1,029 

352 

25,11 U 
1,727 



2,205 
16,793 



302 
1,839 



180,^n 

2U3 

3,59U 

2,6U6 

29,699 

611 

21,1 U9 

839 



20.374 

35,842 

9,049 

4,627 

471,553 

57,098 

183,240 

22,493,127 

2,125,927 

16,540 

528,753 
41,960 
69,065 
22,316 
14,623 

101.613 

284,671 

7,933 

10,581 

27,930 

37,903 
40.345 
585,295 
56.169 
13.230 

777.828 
16.013 
24,226 
42,144 

327,197 

14,252 

36,651 

370,936 

54,050 

9,252 

46.888 

5.325 

2.763,991 

90,201 

82.373 

5.994 

654.372 

17.052 

2.340,848 

17,767 



2,872,606 



123,304,049 



$ 

20,248.00 

37,059.75 

9.860.24 

4.652.07 

480,770.10 

60,063.43 

190,517.62 

22,967,386.10 

2,161,968.07 

17,083.94 

516,617.54 
42,115.95 
70,368.59 
25,426.10 
15,070.65 

105,710.75 

299,398.97 

7,975.73 

10,787.05 

28,802.05 

39,316.20 
40,525.44 
603,548.40 
56,876.88 
13,189.85 

792,548.60 
16,181.19 
24,599.85 
41,510.04 

342,972.69 

14,232.28 

36,803.89 

375,138.49 

56,269.05 

9.613.45 

47.779.00 

5,465.94 

2,884,328.57 

96,369.11 

83,774.05 

6,910.45 

686,253.17 

16.767.35 

2.402,965.82 

17,692.29 



126,031,436.45 



126.00 
1,217.75 

811.2U 

25.07 

9,217.10 

2,965.U3 

7,277.62 

A7.'f,259.10 

36,0U1.07 

5U3.9U 

12.135.46 

155.95 

1,303.59 

3,110.10 

4^7.65 

^,097.75 

H,727.97 

U2.73 

206.05 

872.05 

1,U13.20 

180.U 

18,253.40 

707.88 

40.15 

n.720.60 
168.19 
373.85 
633.96 

15,775.69 

19.72 

152.89 

U,202.U9 

2,219.05 

361 .1^5 

891 .00 

1U0.9U 

120,337.57 

6,168.11 

1,U01.05 

916.U5 
31,881.17 

284.65 

62,117.82 

74.71 



2,727,387.^5 



$ 
47.00 
44.00 
41.10 
38.70 
41.70 

45.50 
37.90 
39.25 
43.45 
44.30 

34.75 
37.50 
43.60 
42.00 
42.00 

36.40 
40.50 
46.90 
38.50 
39.10 

40.70 
41.00 
36.00 
45.60 
41.30 

39.00 
39.50 
43.60 
43.00 
40.20 

39.40 
46.30 
34.80 
45,30 
42.00 

41.00 
40.90 
38.00 
42.50 
43.00 

35.00 
39.80 
44.70 
40.65 
44.40 



$ 
47.30 
42.55 
37.72 
38.50 
40.90 

43.25 
36.45 
38.44 
42.73 
42.89 

35.57 
37.36 
42.79 
36.86 
40.75 

34.99 
38.51 
46.63 
37.76 
37.92 

39.24 
40.82 
34.91 
45.04 
41.42 

38.27 
39.08 
42.94 
43.66 
38.35 

39.46 
46.11 
34.41 
43.52 
40.42 

40.24 
39.86 
36.41 
39.78 
42.29 

30.37 
37.96 
45.46 
39.60 
44.58 



I 



134 



Appendix II — Fit 



}cial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO 
Summary of the Allocation 

for the Year 





Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 


Cost of 




Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 


Energy 


Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 


Frequency 
standardiza- 
tion 


Net withdrawal 

from 

stabilization 

of rates 

reserve 




kw 
3,184.764.2 
494.494.6 

246,443.5 

384,696.4 
1,233.2 


megawatt- 
hours 
18,291,018.0 
2,567,932.0 

1,891,568.3 

2,498,314.1 
5.287.0 


$ 
116,046,697 
20,535,712 

9,234,797 

13,610.377 

112,575 

55.043 


$ 
12,715,215 
1,343,426 

271,249 

308,990 


$ 
2,585,257 




uoi,uio 


Direct customers: 


1 200,05 2\ 

1664,775/ 

312,280 
1,001 


Rural 




2,237,055 












Grand Total 


4,311.631.9 


25.254,119.4 


159.595,201 

(Note 1 ) 


16,925,935 

(Note 2) 


2,835,225 
(Note 3) 



NOTES 

1. The total of $159,595,201 shown under the heading "Power purchased, operating costs, 
and fixed charges" inckides the following items of cost shown in the Statement of Operations: 

Cost of power purchased % 12,922,870 

Operation, maintenance, and administrative expenses 53,830,068 

Interest 64,583,199 

Depreciation 15,126,023 

Sinking fund provision 17,012,676 

Interchange of power with Xorthern Ontario Properties 

(877,316 megawatt-hours) 3,247,989 

Sale of secondary energy, other than 60-cycle export 631,646 

$159,595,201 

Except for minor refinements and variations, the method used to allocate the cost of power 
supplied to each customer in 1960 was followed in 1961. 



Southern Ontario System — Cost of Primary Power 



135 



SYSTEM 

of the Cost of Primary Power 
Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 


Amounts 

billed 

for primary 

power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 




Credit 
resulting 

from 

matured 

sinking fund 


Sale of 
60-cycle 
secondary 
export 
energy 


Total cost 

of 

primary power 


Net income 
from rural 

direct 
customers 


Net cost 

of 

primary power 


Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 


$ 
2,872,606 


$ 


$ 
123,304,049 

21,477,728 

9,669.614 

13,607,087 
111,574 


$ 


$ 
123,304.049 
20,988,302 

9,669,614 

14,097,620 
110,467 


$ 
126,031,436.45 
20,988,302.00 

9,669,614.00 

14,097,620.00 
110,467.00 


$ 
2,727,387 45 






1^89,l^26 




301,155 










490,533 
1,107 












2,31^2,098 
















3,173,761 


2,3^2,098 


168,170,052 




168,170,052 


170,897,439.45 


2,727,38745 









2. Frequenc}' standardization costs are shown in the Statement of Operations as follows: 

Interest $ 7,242,368 

Portion of cost written off 9,683,567 



$ 16,925,935 

This represents a charge to all customers in the Niagara Division (except those which are not 
being supplied at 60 cycles) at the rate of $5 per kilowatt on the average monthly peak load sup- 
plied amounting to $14,638,880 plus an amount equal to the net revenue on the export of 60-c>cle 
secondary energy amounting to $2,287,055. 

3. The net withdrawal from the stabilization of rates and contingencies reserve totalling 
$2,835,225 consists of a withdrawal from the reserve of $3,500,000 (applied to reduce the costs of 
all customers in proportion to their average monthly peak loads) less a provision equal to the net 
income from the municipal direct customers ($664,775), to be retained for the future benefit of 
these customers as a group. 



136 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 



Municipality 



Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 



Balance at 
January 1, 1961 



Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 



Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 



Balance at 
December 31. 1961 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig. . . . 

Ajax 

Alexandria .... 
Alfred 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Alvinston 

Amherstburg . . 
Ancaster Twp.. 

Apple Hill 

Arkona 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens 

Aurora 

Avonmore 

Aylmer 

Ayr 

Baden 

Bancroft 

Barrie 

Barry's Bay. . . 

Bath 

Beachburg .... 

BeachvillL' 

Beamsville .... 

Beaver ton 

Beeton 

Belle Rivtr 

Belleville 

Blenheim 

Bloomfield .... 

Blylh 

Bobcaygeon . . . 

Bolton 

Bothwell 

Bowmanville . . 
Bracebridge . . . 
Bradford 

Braesid? 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brantford Twp 
Brechin 



395,673.94 

56,337.96 

101,286.66 

147,754.29 

8,181,67 

143,564.23 

58,588.95 

55,100.80 

311,193.56 

129.737.69 

13.435.62 
32.217.90 
220.255.01 
83,720.83 
35,124.15 

190,173.93 

4,543.00 

289,821.32 

73,113.74 

120,688.85 

36,148.53 

999.548.07 

12.897.89 

18.230.12 



202.390.32 
88.335.63 
95.895.96 
60,638.77 
64,343.84 

1,324,265.14 
175,397.25 
37,955.14 
57,067.86 
29,783.29 

84,705 57 
64,913.34 

483.425.82 
2.030.07 

113,984.12 

26,029.09 

854,675.86 

4,733,736.86 

232,969.85 

23,608.87 



28,131.64 

212.91 

28,805.47 

14,784.81 

2,432.27 

15,011.69 

9,795.56 

3,311.03 

24,802.69 

15.397.51 

900.95 

2,829.72 

26,591.20 

6,457.43 

3,215.97 

30,737.96 
897.72 

25,393.27 
3.946.74 
3,656.90 

7,904.94 
101,809.53 
2.372.92 
2.143.20 
1,414.00 

12,038.74 
9,537.43 
5,118.73 
4,361.48 
5,632.75 

141,940.61 
9.046.51 
3,225.21 
5,184.71 
4,618.33 

4.745.14 
326.25 

44.148.03 
369.20 

12.345.36 

7.387.16 

72,381.27 

278.712.02 

33,404.79 

573.^8 



993.55 



423,805.58 

56,125.05 

130,092.13 

162,539.10 

10,613.94 

158,575.92 

68,384.51 

58,411.83 

335,996.25 

145,135.20 

14,336.57 
35,047.62 
246,846.21 
90.178.26 
38.340.12 

220,911.89 

5,440.72 

316,208.14 

77,060.48 

124,345.75 

44,053.47 

1,101,357.60 

15,270.81 

20,373.32 

1,414.00 

214.429.06 
97,873.06 

101,014.69 
65,000.25 
69,976.59 

1.466,205.75 

184,443.76 

41,180.35 

62,252.57 

34,401.62 

89.450.71 
65.239.59 

527.573.85 
2.399.27 

126,329.48 

33,416.25 

927,057.13 

5,012,448.88 

266,374.64 

23,035.39 



J 



Southern Ontario System — Sinking Fund Equity 



137 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(continued) 





Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 


Municipality 


Balance at 
January 1. 1961 


Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 


Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 


Balance at 
December 31, 1961 


Bridgeport 


$ 
52,266.42 
43,937.62 
97,029.59 
1,138,976.52 
67,843.62 

72,853.45 

23,517.64 

18,613.83 

724,792.89 

107,022.74 

3,760.02 

15,311.18 

69,553.82 

64,190.33 

389.624.64 

17,828.67 
48,062.83 
12,593.42 
1,970,103.20 
26.333.91 

162.215.99 

121.471.61 

89.103.21 

38.829.79 

226.988.51 

31.010.49 

530,495.36 

52,929.66 

56.980.31 

619.224.21 

64,980.16 
29,897.70 
25,082.95 
23,952.25 
52,348.88 

38,345.08 
38,887.05 
21,042.25 
121.331.69 
67.137.24 

36,999.48 
52,759.31 
151,853.46 
30,949.29 
24,098.89 


$ 

5,587.66 
1,524.79 
9,883.18 
88,164.18 
5,571.74 

4,669.71 
1,328.92 
4,114.55 
154,981.72 
6,629.59 

3,451.40 
1,261.55 
2,530.56 
6,538.61 
30,250.99 

4,068.15 
3.871.51 
2,526.94 
109,904.19 
1,690.73 

11,314.04 
7,608.42 
7,870.13 
3,160.19 

13.841.97 

3.822.42 

59,093.81 

6.247.19 

3.524.28 

36.270.89 

653.37 
2.532.46 
2.070.32 
1.679.09 
2,853.97 

2.081.62 
16.050.48 

1,393.14 
14,874.27 

7,342.49 

2,565.62 
2,897.64 
7,798.68 
1,685.46 
1,600.65 


$ 


$ 
57,854.08 




45,462.41 


Brighton 




106,912.77 






1,227,140.70 


Brussels 




73.415.36 


Burford 




77.523.16 


Burgessville .... 




24.846.56 






22.728.38 


Burlington . . 




879.774.61 


Caledonia 




113.652.33 


Campbellford 

Campbellville 

Canning! on 




7.211.42 




16.572.73 




72.084.38 


Cardinal 


. . 


70,728.94 






419,875.63 






21,896.82 






51,934.34 


Chalk River 




15,125.36 






2,080.007.39 






28,624.64 






173,530.03 






129,080.03 






96.973.34 


Clifford 




41.989.98 


Chnton 




240,830.48 


Cobden 




34,832.91 


Cobourg 




589.589.17 


Col borne 




59,176.85 






60.504.59 


Collingwood 




655,495.10 






65.633.53 






32,430.16 






27,153.27 






25,631.34 






55,202.85 






40,426.70 






54,937.53 






22,435.39 


Delhi . . . 




136,205.96 






74,479.73 


Dorchester .... 




39,565.10 






55.656.95 






159.652.14 






32,634.75 


Dublin ... . 




25,699.54 









138 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(continued) 



Municipality 



Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 



Balance at 
January 1. 1961 



Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 



Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 



Balance at 
December 31, 1961 



Dundalk 


$ 

63,352.20 
660,365.98 
350,240.16 
145.100.31 

76.352.84 

2.388.971.00 

12.127.10 

371,355.25 

63,006.21 

22.113.36 

146.169.91 

48,002.00 

41,775.36 

7,548.87 

18,714.44 

166,668.99 

3,878,348.64 

223,406.93 

346,489.39 

25,319.66 

31,521.58 
64.578.88 
170,611.05 
1.171,386.66 
23,686.75 

2.537.179.52 
556,008.96 

83,834.38 
569,243.28 

46,021.75 

58,037.99 

27,681.37 

219,990.68 

135,757.63 

3,054,783.25 

297,021.43 
27,939,469.48 
386,940.26 
158.720.35 
145.914.06 

31.293.23 
56.803.75 
60.587.96 
82.219.06 
599.466.64 


$ 

3.654.94 

38.760.46 

25.937.24 

9.234.19 

2.376.24 

236.110.84 

3.176.08 

24.048.82 

3.213.10 

1.656.38 

4.715.11 
1.881.79 
3,365.01 
567.95 
3.308.58 

12.228.07 

636.911.62 

16.246.86 

24.142.88 

2,233.79 

1,929.07 

7,511.16 

11,706.84 

101,855.47 

3,918.47 

142.617.61 
41,288.93 

4,854.22 
36,316.97 

5,756.10 

4,550.30 

842.05 

17,125.53 

17,335.31 

187,171.58 

10,755.17 

2,243,780.44 

30,333.34 

8,452.94 

11,373.48 

3,187.73 
4,726.15 

14.451.52 
5.820.04 

38.999.82 


$ 


67.007.14 




12.124.40 


711.250.84 




376.177.40 






154.334.50 


Dutton 




78.729.08 


East York Twi) 


2,625,081.84 
15.303.18 










395,404.07 






66.219.31 


Elmwood 




23.769.74 


Elora 




150.885.02 


Embro 




49.883.79 


Erieau 




45,140.37 


Erie Beach 




8,116.82 


Erin 




22,023.02 


Essex 




178.897.06 


Etobicoke Twp 




4,515.260.26 
239.653.79 


Exeter 




Fergus 




370,632.27 


Finch 




27,553.45 


Flesherton 




33,450.65 


Fonthill 




72,090.04 


Forest 




182,317.89 


Forest Hill.. 




1 273 242 13 


Frankford. . 




27 605 22 


Gait 

Georgetown 


9.922.36 


2,689,719.49 
597,297.89 


Glencoe 




88 688 60 


Goderich 




605 560 25 


Grand Bend 




51,777.85 


Grand Valley 




62 588 29 


Granton 




28.523.42 


Gravenhurst 




237,116.21 


Grimsby 




153,092.94 


Guelph 




3,241,954.83 


Hagersville 




307 776 60 


Hamilton 




30,183,249.92 


Hanover 




417,273.60 


Harriston 




167,173.29 


Harrow 




157,287.54 


Hastings 




34,480,96 
61,529.90 


Havelock 




Hawkesbury 




75.039.48 


Hensall 




88.039.10 


Hespeler 




638.466.46 









Southern Ontario System — Sinking Fund Equity 



139 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(continued) 





Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 


Municipality 


Balance at 
January 1, 1961 


Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 


Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 


Balance at 
December 31, 1961 


Highgate 

Holstein 


$ 

36.739.75 

12.060.70 

312.572.60 

768,487.91 

43,677.90 

60,534.45 
126.331.45 


$ 

1,658.35 

978.50 

23,299.90 

35,575.96 

4.983.12 

4.039.38 

12,717.26 

1,295.00 

20.089.27 

242.618.30 

14.161.87 

597.42 

384,218.27 

9,525.25 

5,537.50 

2,812.11 

2,240.73 

46,022.79 

66,858.60 

20,730.92 

561,944.20 

42,133.89 

1,943.59 

1.119.04 

7,265.61 

343.94 

6,800.60 

, 583.59 

5,475.55 

17.021.29 

5,158.09 
1,16H.47 
3,936.84 
21,724.78 
3,033.50 

2,642.99 

56.437.12 

3.430.06 

3.121.62 

20.356.60 

5,826.27 

55,754.38 

11,912.63 

1,731.66 

8.279.05 


$ 


38,398.10 




13,039.20 


Huntsville 




335,872.50 


Ingersoll 

Iroquois • . 




802,063.87 


47.30 


48,708.32 


Jarvis 


64,573.83 






139,048.71 


Killaloe Station .... 


8,304.44 


9,599.44 


Kincardine 


230.222.03 
2.078.507.48 

198,066.06 

13.000.47 

6.243.516.05 

99.131.20 

62,184.30 

32.402.63 

26,373.30 

528.004.94 

685.840.02 

373.008.72 

9,843,587.98 

371,572.30 

9,364.86 

78.460.43 

96.691.61 

47,299.74 

66,439.93 

3,439.79 

57,570.72 
140,414.24 

47,552.23 
12,301.44 
45,851.45 
212,569.57 
44,312.44 

17,249.66 

904,714.89 

34,051.43 

24,590.51 

446.051.59 

159.490.54 

716.402.27 

201.212.12 

26,615.06 

69,651.24 


250,311.30 


Kingston 

Kingsville 




2,321,125.78 




212,227.93 


Kirk field 




13.597.89 


Kitchener 




6.627.734.32 


Lakefield 




108.656.45 


Lambeth 




67,721.80 


Lanark 




35,214.74 






28,614.03 






574,027.73 


Lindsay 


5,010.90 


757,709.52 




393,739.64 


London 


400,246.16 


10,805,778.34 




413,706.19 






11,308.45 


Lucan 




79,579.47 


Lucknow 




103,957.22 


Lynden 




47,643.68 


Madoc 




73,240.53 


Magnetawan 




4,023.38 


Markdale 




63.046.27 


Markham 




157.435.53 


Marmora 




52,710.32 


Martintown 




13.469.91 


Maxville 




49.788.29 


Meaford 




234.294.35 


Merlin 




47.395.94 


Mer ickville 




19,892.65 


Midland 




961,152.01 


Mildmav 




37.481.49 


Millbrook 




27.712.13 


Milton 




466.408.19 


Milverton 




165.316.81 


Mimico 




772.156.65 


Mitchell 




213,124.75 


Moorefield 




28,346.72 


Morrisburg 




77,930.29 









140 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(continued) 



Municipality 



Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 



Balance at 
January 1, 1961 


Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 


Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 


Balance at 
December 31, 1961 


$ 

35,714.48 

174,400.32 

293,449.25 

28,037.41 

3.850.24 

9,871.65 

18,106.13 

46,878.63 

194.017.35 

252,731.05 

2,351,959.37 

174,420.37 

2,287.578.56 

5.068.991.22 

142,752.16 

44,627.63 

756.380.88 

78,493.52 

26,793.58 

256,618.50 

127,516.70 

23,178.48 

4,041,545.48 

5,659,937.54 

41,250.80 

1,217,400.02 

52,078.67 

176,536.94 

466.883.09 

92.128.42 

70.642.72 

263.358.44 

377.120.62 

2.646.811.20 

364.535.52 

8.589.73 
327,550.36 

52.082.04 
375,345.66 

19.491.46 

600.960.67 
397.700.72 
159.368.11 
108,977.05 
553,173.47 


$ 

2,075.80 
11,374.94 
27,320.97 

2,152.54 
589.01 

1,563.87 
1,103.21 
5,524.15 
8,607.01 
37,586.59 

149.839.86 

11.079.69 

100.726.55 

896,124.14 

3,890.17 

4,51611 

175.590.24 

2,553.89 

2,901.74 

25,676.91 

28,163.67 

3,192.14 

428,281.82 

882,694.49 

2,750.64 

73,981.14 
4.017.15 
8.417.47 

19.226.05 
6,839.84 

13,636.71 
13,127.36 
32,844.82 
260,899.45 
13.452.13 

4,059.59 
29.069.01 

3.901.61 
28,354.93 

1,860.86 

48,672.42 
66,731.05 
15,249.72 
10,120.08 
52,664.94 


$ 


$ 
37,790.28 




185,775.26 




320,770.22 




30,189.95 




4,439.25 




11,435.52 




19,209.34 




52,402.78 




202,624.36 


71.71 


290,389.35 
2,501,799.23 




185,500.06 




2,388,305.11 




5,965,115.36 




146,642.33 




49,143.74 




931,971.12 




81,047.41 




29,695.32 




282,295.41 
155,680.37 




26,370.62 




4,469,827.30 




6,542,632.03 




44,001.44 




1,291,381.16 




56,095.82 




184,954.41 




486,109.14 




98,968.26 




84,279.43 




276,485.80 




409,965.44 




2.907.710.65 




377.987.65 




12.649.32 




356.619.37 




55.983.65 




403.700.59 




21.352.32 




649.633.09 




464.431.77 


636.89 


175.254.72 
119,097.13 




605,838.41 







Mount Brydges. . 
Mount Forest . . . 

Napanee 

Neustadt 

Newboro 

Newburgh 

Newbury 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg. . . 
Newmarket 

New Toronto. . . . 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls. . . . 
North York Twp. 
Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Oil Springs 

Omemee 

Orangeville 

Orillia 

Orono 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound . . . . 
Penetanguishene . 

Perth 

Peterborough. . . . 
Petrolia 

Pickering 

Picton 

Plattsville 

Point Edward , , 
Port Burwell . . . . 

Port Colborne . . . 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 



Southern Ontario System — Sinking Fund Equity 



141 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(continued) 



Municipality 



Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 



Balance at 
January 1, 1961 



Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 



Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 



Balance at 
December 31, 1961 



Port McNicoll 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley 

Prescott 

Preston 

Priceville 

Princeton 

Queenston 

Renfrew 

Richmond 

Richmond Hill 

Ridgetown 

Ripley 

Riverside 

Rockland 

Rockwood 

Rodney 

Rosseau 

Russell 

St. Catharines 

St. Clair Beach 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sandwich East Twp. 
Sandwich West Twp 

Sarnia 

Scarborough Twp. . . 

Seaforth 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls 

Smithville 

Southampton 

Springfield 

Stamford Twp 

Stayner 

Stirling 

Stoney Creek 

Stouffville 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville 



67,356.88 
104,350.80 

34,307.03 
174,565.96 
288,060.27 

1,069,114.16 

4.773.69 

40,229.59 

33,258.76 

147,182.76 

26,609.50 
281,260.38 
179,453.26 

37,720.95 
472,101.46 

21,923.09 
49,042.88 
61,027.37 
15,981.82 
26,872.15 

5,595,027.74 

40,174.89 

58,031.90 

73,554.80 

577,339.49 

1,939,613.88 

225,545.30 

408,237.17 

4,187,056.92 

4,090,016.69 

225,668.83 

96,297.03 

603,547.03 

595,925.41 

37.202.09 

103.682.29 
34.019.30 

813,431.32 
86,715.83 
63,486.06 

108,712.98 
122,832.22 
2.211,987.31 
387,695.19 
105,630.08 



$ 

6,506.00 


$ 


$ 
73,862.88 


10,163.03 
2,595.28 




114.513.83 
36.902.31 


6,520.33 




181.086.29 


22,798.84 




310,859.11 


47,014.46 




1,116,128.62 


389.11 




5,162.80 


2,003.40 




42,232.99 


2,551.29 




35,810.05 


23,879.31 




171,062.07 


3,539.38 




30,148.88 


51,522.42 




332,782.80 


8.429.62 




187,882.88 


2,960.37 




40,681.32 


45,432.06 




517,533.52 


5,090.92 




27,014.01 


2,289.90 




51,332.78 


3,931.33 




64,958.70 


1,116.27 




17.098.09 


2,309.89 




29.182.04 


521,105.11 
4,129.00 


238,922.82 


6.355.055.67 
44,303.89 


2,397.97 




60,429.87 


4,070.07 




77,624.87 


44,881.49 




622,220.98 


91,487.72 
34,436.82 


22,491.93 


2.053.593.53 
259,982.12 


63,792.49 




472,029.66 


728.326.32 




4,915,383.24 


707.801.28 




4,797,817.97 


5.652.64 




231,321.47 


7,807 83 




104.104.86 


49.042.74 
52 329 02 


92.81 


652,682.58 
648,254.43 


3 999 08 




41,201.17 


9 566 29 




113,248.58 


1 724 81 




35,744.11 


89 621 02 




903,052.34 


5 795 49 




92.511.32 


6 277 44 




69.763.50 


19 321 52 




128.034.50 


13 610 29 




136,442.51 


105 521 67 




2.317.508.98 


19.357.15 
16 783 20 




407.052.34 




122.413.28 









142 



Appendix II — Financial 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(continued) 



Municipality 



Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and Interest allowed 



Balance at 
January 1, 1961 


Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 


Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 


Balance at 
December 31, 1961 


$ 

42,875.16 

11,198.13 

100,553.88 

524,671.65 

40,555.83 

174,704.53 

138,652.38 

62,026.07 

74,382.98 

81,791.33 

47,583.18 
27,598.53 
33,856.49 
14,360.86 
719,936.87 

234,887.33 

411,647.88 

78,668,476.20 

1,825,574.30 

47,501.03 

841,771.13 
79,213.97 

120,374.22 
14,659.41 
30,832.58 

186,356.68 

1,016,242.24 

19,271.21 

23,144.78 

20,684.65 

96,605.52 

132,431.72 

1,338,208.00 

121,422.09 

27,037.39 

1,594,606.87 
59.928.59 
60,295.16 
123.883.44 

1,058,957.85 

32,637.25 

80,696.91 

458,157.91 

105,059.40 

27,889.90 


$ 
969.64 
2,340.93 
8.865.16 
45.716.87 
3,613.46 

6.288.94 
11.201.10 
5,635.13 
3,875.63 
4,597.11 

4,032.33 

5,028.94 

745.61 

1,060.20 

77,888.47 

11,821.08 

26,670.11 

4,563,258.90 

290,743.01 

3,662.63 

96,211.85 
7,964.56 

12,410.97 
3,125.38 
2,060.80 

19,049.27 

53,876.36 

1,580.66 

2,113.79 

3,777.39 

5,174.38 
6,782.95 
92,380.86 
9,437.46 
2,115.23 

118,630.40 

2,263.76 

5,087.81 

7.361.49 

59,447.97 

2,927.49 

6.910.88 

62,712.32 

10,132.38 

1,844.42 


$ 


$ 
43,844.80 
13,539.06 






109,419.04 




570,388.52 




44,169.29 




180,993.47 




149,853.48 




67,661.20 




78,258.61 




86,388.44 




51,615.51 




32,627.47 




34,602.10 




15.421.06 




797,825.34 




246,708.41 
438,317.99 




83 231,735.10 




2 116,317.31 




51 163.66 




937,982.98 




87,178.53 




132,785.19 




17 784.79 




32,893.38 




205,405.95 




1 070,118.60 




20,851.87 




25,258.-57 




24,462.04 




101,779.90 




139,214.67 




1,430 588.86 




130,859.55 




29,152.62 


175,925.15 


1,889,162.42 
62,192.35 




65,382.97 
131,244.93 




1,118,405.82 




35,564.74 




87,607.79 




520,870.23 




115,191.78 




29,734.32 







Sunderland 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Swansea 

Tara 

Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Tees water 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 

Thedford 

Thornbury 

Thorndale 

Thornton 

Thorold 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto 

Toronto Twp. . . . 
Tottenham 

Trenton 

Tweed 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill . . . 
Victoria Harbour 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Wardsville 

Warkworth 

Wasaga Beach . 

Waterdown 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Waubaushene . . . 

Welland 

Wellesley 

Wellington 

West Lome 

Weston 

Westport 

Wheatley 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Williamsburg. . . . 



Southern Ontario System — Sinking Fund Equity 



143 



SOUTHERN ONTARIO SYSTEM 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 

as at December 31, 1961 

(concluded) 



Municipality 



Net amount paid as part of cost of power by each municipality together 

with proportionate share of other sinking funds provided out of revenues 

of the system and interest allowed 



Balance at 
January 1, 1961 



Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 



Sinking fund 

equity acquired 

through 

annexation 



Balance at 
December 31, 1961 



Winchester 

Windermere 

Windsor 

Wingham 

Woodbridge 

Woodstock 

Woodville 

Wyoming 

York Twp 

Zurich 

Total — ^Municipalities 

Rural Power District 

Administrative and servx ■ buildings 
and equipment 

Grand Total 



105,689.36 

14,377.43 

12,500,183.52 

210.772.00 

195,035.92 

1,876,068.50 
34,356.40 
40,823.79 

4,612,909.33 
55,240.66 



260,134,657.18 
47,644,237.89 



3,945,420.92 



311,724,365.99 



7.730.00 

1,154.10 

604,270.83 

18,733.97 

12,561.78 

113,270.34 

2.742.45 

407,534.73 

3,177.62 



20,670.377.39 
6,853,143.52 



359,420.00 



27,882,940.91 
(see note) 



874,790.42 
87U,79042 



113,419.36 

15..^j31..53 

13,104,454.35 

229,505.97 

207,597.70 

1,989,338.84 
33.821.97 
43,566.24 

5,020,444.06 
58,418.28i 

281,679,824.99 
53,622.640.99 

4.304,840.92 

339,607,306.90 



Note: The net provision and interest credited during the year consist of the following amounts shown 
in the Statement of Sinking Fund Reserve: 

Interest $12,468,974.64 

Provision— direct 18,380.260.00 

—indirect 264,736.00 

$31,113,970.64 
Less credits resulting from matured sinking funds 3,231,029.73 



$27,882,940.91 



144 



Appendix II — Financial 



NORTHERN ONTARIO 

FIXED 

Statement Showing Changes during 





In 




Balance 

January 1, 

1961 


Changes 


Property 


Placed 

in 
service 


Transferred 

to "Under 

construction" 

(Note) 


Power System 

Hydro-electric Generating Stations 

NORTHEASTERN DIVISION 

Abitibi River 

Abitibi Canyon 


21,024,383 
138,231 


$ 

163,209 
28,117,623 


$ 


Otter Rapids 




Mattagami River 

Little Long 




Mississagi Riv^er 

George W . Rayner . . 


18,535,810 

8,648,568 

25,139,323 


43,251 

8,050,958 

210,629 


3,366 


Red Rock Falls. .... 




Other properties . . 


2,536,530 






73,486,315 


36,585,670 


2,539,896 


NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

Nipigon River 

Pine Portage 


31,963,636 
15,482,795 
11,869,666 

12,681,959 

23,698,174 
15,502,015 

21,236,857 

16,270,836 
11,365,946 


15,782 

104,226 

3,034 

6,736 

19,484 
17,041 

10,556 

10,581 
42,808 




Cameron Falls 




Alexander 




Aguasabon River 

Aguasabon 




English River 

Caribou Falls 




Manitou Falls 




Winnipeg River 

Whitedog Falls 




Kaministikwia River 
Silver Falls . . 




Other properties . . . 


517,753 








160,071,884 


209,086 


517,753 


Thermal-electric Generating Stations 

NORTHEA.STERN DIVISION 

Diesel-electric .... . . ... 


387,078 


1,023 




NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

Thunder Bay 














387,078 


1,023 








Total generating .stations 


233,945,277 


36,795,779 


3,057,649 


Transformer Stations 

Northeastern Division 


25,319,969 
10,500,570 


468,616 
145,078 




Northwestern Division 








Total transformer stations 


35,820,539 


613,694 








Transmission Lines 

Northeastern Division 


33,972,007 
31,173,250 


467,519 
286,406 




Northwestern Division 


51,223 






Total transmission lines 


65,145,257 


753,925 


51,223 







ISorthern Ontario Properties — Fixed Assets 



145 



PROPERTIES 

ASSETS 

Year 1961 and Balances at December 31, 1961 



service 


Under 

construction 

December 31, 

1961 


Total 

fixed assets 

December 31, 

1961 




during year 


Balance 

December 31, 

1961 




Equipment 
relocated 

and 
reclassified 


Sales 

and 

retirements 


Expenditures 

during 

1961 


$ 

63,200 
35,907 


4,430 


% 

21,119,872 
28,291,761 


% 

43,545 
461,132 

21,188,901 

4,222 

131,621 

2,392,254 


$ 

21.163,417 
28,752,893 

21,188,901 

18,575,775 
16,831,097 
25,003,146 


$ 

56,423 
8,107,111 






14^544^338 




4,142 

50 

229,913 


18,571,553 
16,699,476 
22,610,892 


2,960 




423,190 


27,383 


377,613 




238,535 


107,293,554 


24,221,675 


131,515,229 


23,511,635 






266 


3,983 

2,325 

18,969 

1,436 


31,975,169 
15,584,696 
11,853,731 

12,687,259 

23,717,658 
15,510,339 

21,247,413 

15,947,039 
11,196,957 


7,879 
13,885 


31,983,048 
15,598,581 
11,853,731 

12,785,895 

23,937,304 
15,510,339 

21,415,206 

15,999,715 
11,833,216 


18,696 
90,734 




22,993 




98,636 
219,646 


103,937 
81,797 




8,717 


17,041 




167,793 

52,676 
636,259 


21,039 


313,216 




26,960 


313,646 


7,690 


97,742 


164 


43,120 


159,720,261 


1,196,774 


160,917,035 


434,953 






388,101 


628 
24,020,439 


388,729 
24,020,439 


2,878 






6,239,106 














388,101 


24,021,067 


24,409,168 


6,236,228 








164 


281,655 


267,401,916 


49,439,516 


316,841,432 


30,182,816 


28,663 
2,488 


218,095 
176,209 


25,599,153 
10,471,927 


363,826 
164,558 


25,962,979 
10,636,485 


597,533 
162,758 


31,151 


394,304 


36,071,080 


528,384 


36,599,464 


760,291 


71,059 
1,444 


85,832 
52,726 


34,424,753 
31,357,151 


3,465,234 
765,704 


37,889,987 
32,122,855 


2,625,691 
574,031 


72,503 


138,558 


65,781,904 


4,230,938 


70,012,842 


3,199,722 



146 



Appendix II — Financial 



NORTHERN ONTARIO 

FIXED 

Statement Showing Changes during 





In 




Balance 

Januarv 1, 

1961 


Changes 


Property 


Placed 

in 
service 


Transferred 

to "Under 

construction" 

(Note) 


Power System — (continued) 

Communications 


$ 
3,918,223 


$ 
88,072 


$ 






Total power system 


338,829,296 


38,251,470 


3,108,872 


Administrative and Service Land, 
Buildings and Equipment 

Land and Buildings 


2,500,619 
786,402 


75,601 
70,416 


1,853 


Office and Service Equipment. ... 








Total administrative and service land, 
buildings and equipment 


3,287,021 


146,017 


1,853 






Retail Distribution 

Rural Power District . . . 


39,969,125 


2,362,451 








Local Systems 
Northeastern Division 


4,123,082 
660,782 


516,487 
65,995 




Northwestern Division 








Total local systems 


4,783,864 


582,482 








Total retail distribution . 


44,752,989 


2,944,933 








Total Fixed Assets 


386,869,306 


41,342,420 


3,110,725 







Changes in Assets under Construction during 1961 

Under construction at January 1, 1961 $ 55,598,650 

Add: 

Transfer from "in service" at January 1, 1961 (Note) 3,110,725 

Expenditures during 1961 37,374,239 



Deduct: 

Placed in service during 1961 



$ 96,083,614 
41,342,420 



Under construction at December 31, 1961 $ 54,741,194 



ISorihern Ontario Properties — Fixed Assets 



147 



PROPERTIES 

ASSETS 

Year 1961 and Balances at December 31, 1961 



service 


Under 

construction 

December 31, 

1961 


Total 

fixed assets 

December 31, 

1961 




during year 


Balance 

December 31, 

1961 




Equipment 
relocated 

and 
reclassified 


Sales 

and 

retirements 


Expenditures 

during 

1961 


$ 
33,052 


$ 
30,316 


$ 
3,942,927 


$ 
160,008 


$ 
4,102,935 


$ 
158,190 


70,766 


844,833 


373,197,827 


54,358,846 


427,556,673 


34,301,019 




3,365 
44,249 


2,571,002 
812,569 


32,271 


2,603,273 
812,569 


40,767 




70,416 










47,614 


3,383,571 


32,271 


3,415,842 


111,183 






76,23S 


303,062 


41,862,276 


295,096 


42,157,372 


2,449,518 


2,087 
7,559 


51,415 

5,895 


4,585,067 
728,441 


49,570 
5,411 


4,635,637 
733,852 


459,873 
52,646 


5,472 


57,310 


5,314,508 


54,981 


5,369,489 


512,519 


70,766 


450,372 


47,176,784 


350,077 


47,526,861 


2,962,037 




1,342,819 


423,758,182 


54,741,194 


478,499,376 


37,374,239 







Summary of Sales and Retirements during 1961 

Charged to accumulated depreciation $ 1,061,511 

Charged to construction in progress 5,053 

Charged to operations 699 

Proceeds from sales 275,556 

$ 1,342,819 

Note: 

The costs of lands acquired and engineering surveys undertaken for proposed projects have in prior 

years been classified as "in service" when incurred. The total of these costs in respect of plant 

not yet in service — $3,110,725 at January 1, 1961 — was transferred on that date to assets under 

construction. 



148 



Appendix II — Financial 



NORTHERN ONTARIO 

Accumulated Depreciation, December 31, 1961 





Power 

System 


Rural Power 
District 


Administrative 

and service 

buildings and 

equipment 


Total 


Balances at Janiiarv 1, 1961 . . . 

Add: 

Interest at 3% per annum on 
accumulated depreciation 
on plant not fully depre- 
ciated 


$ 
41,106,420 

1,152,347 

3,122,257 
241 

782,236 

7,560 
20,877 


$ 
8,097,864 

239,799 
1,175,715 


$ 
732,293 

10,575 


$ 
49,936,577 

1,402,721 


Provision in the year 
— direct 


4,297,972 




92,270 


92,511 


Transfer from re'=!erve for sta- 
bilization of rates and con- 
tingencies (Note 1) 

Adjustments re transfer of 
equipment 

Other adjustments 




782,236 


7,560 
3,573 






74 


24,524 




46,191,938 


9,509,391 


835,212 


56,536,541 


Deduct: 

Cost of fixed assets retired 
less proceeds from sales . . . 

Excess or deficiency of re- 
moval costs over salvage 
recoveries on assets retired 


646,548 
87,709 


379,237 
35,835 


35,726 


1,061,511 
51,874 










734,257 


343,402 


35,726 


1,113,385 


Balances at December 31, 1961 


45,457,681 


9,165,989 


799,486 


55,423,156 



Notes: 

1. The transfer of $782,236 represents an appropriation to eliminate a deficiency arising from losses on premature 
retirements of Power System facilities and from net removal costs incurred in recent years. 

2. As in the Southern Ontario System, studies of retirement experience for certain classes of assets in the Northern 
Ontario Properties were completed during the year. The indicated revisions in estimated service lives were made 
without significant effect on the accounts. 



Frequency Standardization Account, December 31, 1961 

Balance at January 1 , 1961 $ 3,445,863 

Expenditures for frequency standardization work completed during year 14,526 

$ 3,460,389 
Less portion of cost charged to cost of power for the year 123,506 

Balance at December 31, 1961 $ 3,336,883 



Exchange Discount (Net) on Funded Debt, December 31, 1961 



Discount 



Premium 



Net discount 



Exchange discount and premium on funded 
debt issued in United States funds: 
Balances at December 31, 1961 — No changes 
during year 



771,656 



176,489 



535,167 



Northern Ontario Properties — Statements of Reserves 



149 



PROPERTIES 

Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies, December 31, 1961 





Power 
System 


Rural 
Power 
District 


Sub-total 


Portion of reserve 

earmarked for 

special purposes 






Cost- 
contract 
munici- 
palities in 
the former 
Thunder 

Bay 
System 


Nuclear 
research 


Total 


Balances at January 1, 1961 . . 
Add: 

Interest for year on reserve 
balances (Note 1) 

Provision in the year 


$ 
17,104,014 

584,017 
898,858 

128,619 


$ 
333,149 

11,375 


$ 
17,437,163 

595,392 
898,858 

128,619 


$ 
1,728,587 

59,023 


$ 
158,152 

4,350 


$ 
19,323,902 

658,765 
898,858 


Profit on redemption of 
funded debt 






128,619 












18,715,508 


344,524 


19,060,032 


1,787,610 


162,502 


21,010,144 


Deduct: 

Expenditures during year. . 










131,886 


131,886 


Withdrawals in the year ap- 
plied in reduction of 
cost of power 




344,524 


344,524 
782,236 


625,692 


970,216 


Transfer to accumulated de- 
preciation (Note 2) . . . 


782,236 


782,236 


Transfer to accounts pay- 
able 




30,616 


30,616 
















782,236 


344,524 


1,126,760 


625,692 


162,502 


1,914,954 


Balances at December 31, 
1961 


17,933,272 




17,933,272 


1,161,918 




19,095,190 











Note 1: Interest was calculated at a rate approximating the actual earnings on the investments held for the reserves * 
Note 2: The transfer of $782,236 represents an appropriation to eliminate a deficiency in accumulated depreciation 

arising from losses on premature retirements of Power System facilities and from net removal costs incurred 

in recent years. 

Sinking Fund Reserve, December 31, 1961 





Province of Ontario 


Municipali- 
ties supplied 
with power 
at cost 






40-year 
basis 


Prepaid 

sinking 

funds 


Total 


40-year 
basis 


Total 


Balances at January 1, 1961 

Add: 

Interest at 4% per annum on 

reserve balances 

Provision in the year: 
— direct 


$ 
41,928,940 

1,677,158 

3,285,292 
27,419 


$ 
12,741,037 

509,641 


$ 
54,669,977 

2,186,799 

3,285,292 
27,419 


$ 
14,330,759 

573,230 
656,464 


$ 
69,000,736 

2,760,029 
3,941,756 


— indirect 


27,419 












46,918,809 


13,250,678 


60,169,487 


15,560,453 


75,729,940 


Deduct credits resulting from pre- 
paid and matured sinking 
funds (Note): 
Interest 


19,722 
5,192 


509,641 
192,565 


529,363 
197,757 




529,363 


Principal 




197,757 










24,914 


702,206 


727,120 




727,120 








Balances at December 31, 1961 . . . 


46,893,895 


12,548,472 


59,442,3671 15,560,453 


75,002,820 



Note: The matured sinking funds at January 1, 1961 amounted to $493,052. 



150 



Appendix II — Financial 



NORTHERN ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION 

for the Year 



Municipalities supplied 
with power at cost 



Atikokan 

Cache Bay 

Capreol 

Cochrane 

Coniston 

Dryden 

Espanola 

Fort William 

Kapuskasing 

Larder Lake Twp 

Latchford 

Massey 

McGarry 

Nipigon 

North Bay 

Port Arthur 

Red Rock 

Schreiber Twp 

South River 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 

Terrace Bay Twp 

Thessalon 

Webbwood 

West Ferris Twp 

Total — Municipalities 



Primary power and energy 

supplied during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 



Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 



kw 

3,433.0 
522.1 
1,733.4 
2,660.6 
1,026.1 

2,511.8 

2,407.0 

33,100.1 

3,817.5 

902.7 

229.1 

455.8 

936.2 

1,555.7 

14,556.9 

40,166.9 

844.4 

1,189.1 

210.5 

2,418.4 

37,720.5 

1,355.3 

672.4 

154.1 

3,710.4 



158,290.0 



Energy 



megawatt- 
hours 
19,085.4 
1,475.2 
9,138.2 
13,688.2 
5,374.1 

14,736.5 
11,636.9 
211,104.0 
17,586.5 
4,470.4 

988.0 

2,375.0 

4,465.2 

9,115.9 

80,768.7 

210,488.5 

4,261.2 

6,472.8 

1,076.8 

11,952.9 

214,764.0 

8,176.9 

3,689.5 

664.8 

18,915.9 



,471.5 



Cost of 



Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed 

charges 



$ 
153,343 
19,425 
72,848 
90,037 
39,219 

112,106 

89,188 

1,334,439 

138,312 
40,405 

9,464 

21,520 

37,962 

24,584 

561,316 

1,529.302 
32,926 
45,319 
11,760 
96,288 

1,528,497 

52,682 

29,534 

6,387 

144,064 



6,260,927 



Frequency 
standardi- 
zation 



Credit 

resulting 

from 

prepaid and 

matured 
sinking funds 



Northern Ontario Properties — Cost of Primary Power 



151 



PROPERTIES 

OF THE COST OF PRIMARY POWER 
Ended December 31, 1961 













Annual rates on 


primary power 










a kilowatt basis 








Amounts 














billed 








Provision 


Withdrawals 




for primary 








for 


from 




power 


Balance 






stabilization 


stabilization 


Total cost 


(municipalities 


credited 






of rates and 


of rates 


of primary 


at interim 


or 






contingencies 


reserve 


power 


rates) 


charged 


Interim 


Actual 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


3.433 




156,776 


171.647.92 


n,871.92 


50.00 


45.67 


522 




19,947 


20,884.66 


937.66 


40.00 


38.21 


1.734 




74.582 


75,404.00 


822.00 


43.50 


43.03 


2.661 




92.698 


98,443.13 


5,7U5.13 


37.00 


34.84 


1,026 




40,245 


40,633.56 


388.56 


39.60 


39.22 


2.512 




114.618 


128,102.65 


13,A8A.65 


51.00 


45.63 


2.407 




91.595 


96,280.00 


U,685.00 


40.00 


38.05 


33,100 


28/^,801 


1,102,738 


1.108,852.79 


6,111^.79 


33.50 


33.32 


3,817 




142,129 


137,431.20 


4,697.80 


36.00 


37.23 


902 




41,307 


39,717.71 


1,589.29 


44.00 


45.76 


229 




9,693 


9,850.22 


157.22 


43.00 


42.31 


456 




21,976 


21,990.76 


n.76 


48.25 


48.21 


936 




38,898 


40.257.00 


1,359.00 


43.00 


41.55 


1,556 


12,.'^!,6 


53.694 


53,670.52 


23.48 


34.50 


34.51 


14,557 




575,873 


560,439.38 


15,433.62 


38.50 


39.56 


40,167 


321,335 


1,248,134 


1,265.258.15 


17,12^.15 


31.50 


31.07 


844 


6,755 


27,015 


27.106.07 


91.07 


32.10 


31.99 


1.189 


9,513 


36.995 


39,239.75 


2,2U.75 


33.00 


31.11 


211 




11,971 


14,109.44 


2,138.U 


59.24 


56.87 


2.418 




98,706 


99.154.40 


U8.W 


41.00 


40.81 


37.721 




1,566,218 


1,589,920.14 


23,702.11,. 


42.15 


41.55 


1.355 


10,81^2 


43,195 


44,724.64 


1,529.61^ 


33.00 


31.87 


672 




30,206 


31,267.03 


1,061.03 


46.50 


44.92 


154 




6,541 


6,601.41 


60.U1 


42.85 


42.45 


3.711 




147,775 


150,829.45 


3, 05 !t. 1^5 


40.65 


39.83 


158,290 


625,692 


5,793,525 


5,871,815.98 


78,290.98 







152 



Appendix II — Financial 



NORTHERN ONTARIO 

Summary of the Allocation 
for the Year 





Primary power and energy 

suppHed during year 

(principal bases 

of cost allocation) 


Cost of 




Average of 

monthly 
peak loads 


Energy 


Power 

purchased, 

operating 

costs, and 

fixed charges 


frequency 
standardiza- 
tion 


MunicipaHties 

Province of Ontario: 


kw 
158.290.0 

70,104.2 
670.464.0 


megawatt- 
hours 
886,471.5 

378,505.5 
4,419,211.1 


$ 
6,260,927 

7,308,252 
27,826,275 


$ 


28.043 




268,185 






Total — Province of Ontario 


740,568.2 


4,797,716.6 


35,134,527 


296,228 


Grand Total 


898,858.2 


5,684.188.1 


41,395.454 

(Note 1 ) 


296.228 

(Note 2) 



NOTES 



1. The total of $41,395,454 shown under the heading "Power Purchased, operating costs and 
fixed charges" includes the following items of cost shown in the Statement of Operations: 



Cost of power purchased 

Operation, maintenance, and administrative expenses 

I nterest 

Depreciation 

Sinking fund provision 

Interchange of power with Southern Ontario System 

(877,316 megawatt-hours) 

Sale of secondary energy 



$ 818,661 

15,236,046 

15,417,368 

4,297,972 

3,941,756 

3,247,989 
1,564,338 

$41,395,454 



Except for minor refinements and variations the method used to allocate the cost of power 
supplied to each customer in 1960 was followed in 1961. 



Northern Ontario Properties — Cost of Primary Power 



153 



PROPERTIES 

of the Cost of Primary Power 

Ended December 31, 1961 



primary power 


Amounts 

billed for 

primary power 

(municipalities 

at interim 

rates) 




Credit 

resulting 

from 

prepaid and 

matured 
sinking funds 


Provision for 

stabilization 

of rates 

and 

contingencies 


Withdrawals 
from 

stabilization 
of rates 
reserve 


Total 

cost of 

primary 

power 


Balance 
credited 

or 
charged 


S 


$ 
158,290 

70,104 
670,464 


$ 
625,692 

3H,52U 


$ 
5,793,525 

7,061,875 
28,037,804 


$ 
5.871,815.98 

6.917,036.75 
28,761,155.42 


$ 
78 290 98 




144 838 25 


727,120 


723,351.1,2 


727,120 


740,568 


3U,52U 


35,099,679 


35,678,192.17 


578,513.17 


727,120 


898,858 

(Note 3) 


970,216 
(Note 4 ) 


40,893,204 


41,550,008.15 


656,80^.15 



2. Frequency standardization costs are shown in the Statement of Operation as follows: 

Interest $ 172,722 

Portion of cost written off 123,506 



$ 296,228 



This represents a charge of 40 cents per kilowatt on the average monthly peak load supplied to 
all customers served on behalf of the Province of Ontario. 

3. The provision for stabilization of rates and contingencies of $898,858 consists of a charge of 
$1.00 per kilowatt on the average monthly peak load supplied to all customers. 

4. The withdrawals totalling $970,2 16 from the stabilization of rates reserve comprise amounts 

(a) $625,692, calculated at the rate of $8.00 per kilowatt on the average monthly peak load 
of cost-contract municipalities formerly served by the Thunder Bay System, and 
charged to that portion of the reserve held specifically for those municipalities; and 

(b) $344,524, the balance of the reserve held for the benefit of rural customers. 



of: 



154 



Appendix II — Financial 



NORTHERN ONTARIO PROPERTIES 

STATEMENT OF SINKING FUND EQUITY 
as at December 31, 1961 





Net amount paid as part of cost of power by 

each municipality, and other sinking funds 

provided out of revenues of the system and 

interest allowed 


Municipality 


Balance at 
January 1, 1961 


Net provision 
and interest 

credited 
during year 


Balance at 
December 31, 1961 


Atikokan Twp 

Cache Bay 


$ 
83,265.80 
2,025.44 
6,349.79 
7,463.31 
458.00 

76,536.56 

1,544.00 

4,900,691.90 

12,301.28 

3,507.46 

590.02 

412.00 

3,342.44 

100,984.45 

50,065.83 

8,868,526.68 
38,476.42 
49,073.91 


$ 
22,164.63 
1,593.02 
5,925.99 
7,082.53 
3,002.32 

16,953.46 

6,875.76 

371,397.68 

11,030.05 
3,307.30 

755.60 

1,708.48 

3,074.70 

12,369.38 

44,773.63 

553,245.06 

5,455.06 

7,779.96 

775.00 

7,752.39 

118,649.12 

9,985.17 

2,417.66 

492.64 

11,127.76 


$ 
105,430.43 
3,618.46 


Capreol 


12 275 78 


Cochrane 


14,545.84 


Coniston 


3,460.32 


Drvden 


93,490.02 


Espanola 

Fort William 


8,419.76 
5,272,089.58 


Kapuskasing 


23,331.33 


Larder Lake Twp 

Latchford 


6,814.76 
1,345.62 


Massey 


2,120.48 


McGarry 


6,417.14 


Nipigon Twp 


113,353.83 


North Bay 


94,839.46 


Port Arthur 


9,421,771.74 


Red Rock 


43,931.48 


Schreiber Twp. . . 


56,853.87 


South River. 


775.00 


Sturgeon Falls. 


8,534.69 

34,228.00 
77,904.33 

2,666.39 
116.00 

1,694.00 


16,287.08 


Sudbury . . 


152,877.12 


Terrace Bay Twp 

Thessalon 


87,889.50 
5,084.05 


W ebbwood 


608.64 


W est Ferris Twp 


12,821.76 






Total — Municipalities. . 
Province of Ontario 


14,330,758.70 
54,669,977.35 


1,229,694.35 
4,772,389.74 


15,560,453.05 
59,442,367.09 


Grand Total 


69,000,736.05 


6,002,084.09 
(see note) 


75,002,820.14 







Note: The net provision and interest credited during the year consist of the following 
amounts shown in the Statement of Sinking F'und Reserve: 

Interest $ 2,760,029.44 

Provision— direct 3,941,756.00 

—indirect 27,419.00 



Less credits resulting from prepaid and matured sinking fund^ 



$ 6,729,204.44 
727,120.35 

$ 6,002,084.09 



Amalgam ated Systems J 55 



The Amalgamated Systems 



The following statements show the financial position as at January 1, 1962, 
after giving effect to the provisions of the Act to effect the Consolidation of All 
Works and Systems of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario: 

Balance Sheet 

Summary of Fixed Assets 

Accumulated Depreciation 

Exchange Discount (Net) on Funded Debt 

Sinking Fund Equity 

Province of Ontario — Surplus Account 

Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 

The costs and revenues of the Amalgamated Systems will be segregated by 
four basic groups of customers: 

1. Cost-contract Municipalities comprising municipal electrical utilities who have 
contracted for a supply of power at cost for the purpose of retailing this power 
at rates approved by the Commission. 

2. Municipal Bulk comprising industrial customers located within the boundaries 
of cost-contract municipalities but served directly by the Commission at fixed 
rates. 

3. Power District Bulk comprising industrial customers located outside the boun- 
daries of cost-contract municipalities and served directly by the Commission 
and a few remaining municipalities, both being supplied at fixed rates. 

4. Power District Retail comprising retail customers of the former Rural Power 
District and Local Distribution Systems, being all retail customers served by the 
Commission from its distribution lines located outside the boundaries of cost- 
contract municipalities. 

It will be noted on page 161 that special sections of the Reserve for Stabiliza- 
tion of Rates and Contingencies have been set aside for customers in groups 2, 
3 and 4. 

Operating results for each group will be reported commencing with the year 
1962. 



156 Appendix 11 — Financial 

THE HYDRO-ELKCTRIC POWER 

AMALGAMATED 

BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 
EixED Assets at Cost: 

In service $ 2,354,818,383 

Under construction 106,790,874 

$ 2,461,609,257 

Less accumulated depreciation 305,253,151 

$ 2,156,356,106 

Frequency Standardization: 

Cost of completed standardization after charging $168,628,489 
to reserves and cost of power — balance to be written off 
in future years 182,201,400 

Current Assets: 

Cash $ 40,958,532 

Temporar\- in\estments in go\ernment and government- 
guaranteed securities, at market \alue 16,110,585 

Accounts receivable 34,008,853 

91.077,970 



Inventories Held for Operation, Maintenance and 
Construction: 

Coal at cost $ 12,888,610 

Other materials and supplies at cost 12,365,149 

Tools and equipment at cost less depreciation 11,386,417 



36,640,176 



Deferred Charges and Other Assets: 

Debenture discount and expense less amounts written off . . $ 20,929,607 

Account receivable in annual instalments 1962-1989 1,722,928 

Deferred work orders and other assets 6,888,794 

Customers' securities on deposit 1,732,912 



31,274,241 



Investments: 

Investments held at amortized cost plus accrued interest 
on special reserve in\estments (approximate market 
value $273,511,000) 

Special reserves $ 131,195,847 

General reserve 130,062,765 

Sinking fund 20,929,622 



282,188,234 



$ 2,779,738,127 



Auditors' Report 

We have examined the balance sheet of the Amalgamated Systems of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of 
Ontario as at January 1, 1962. Oar examination included a general review of the accounting procedures and such tests 
of accounting records and other supporting evidence as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion the accompanying balance sheet presents fairly the financial position of the Amalgamated Systems 
of the Commission as at January 1, 1962. 

CLARKSON, GORDON & CO. 

Chartered Accountants. 
Toronto, Canada, 
June 29, 1962. 



Amalgamated Systems — Balance Sheet 157 

COMMISSIOX OF ONTARIO 

SYSTEMS 

AS AT JANUARY 1, 1962 

LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND CAPITAL 
Long-term Liabilities: 

Funded debt S 1 ,905,826,000 



Adxances from the Proxince of Ontario ]3,662,.?5 



Total at par of exchange, including $14,233,666 maturing 

in 1962 ^ $ 1,919,488,357 

Less exchange discount (net) incurred on $357,787,357 pax- 
able in United States funds 1,203,272 

S 1,918,285,085 

Current Liabilities: 

Interest accrued on long-term liabilities $ 26,683,703 

Accounts and payrolls payable and accrued charges 22,429,619 

Customers' deposits 4,622,127 

53,735,449 

Special Reserves: 

Pension fund $ 128,278,854 

Employer's liability insurance fund 3,098,399 

Employees' savings and insurance fund 301,035 

131,678,288 

General Reserve: 

Stabilization of rates and contingencies 158,059,842 

Capital: 

Sinking fund equity $ 402,061,655 

Capital contributed by Province of Ontario to assist rural 

construction 115,917,808 

517.979.463 



$ 2,779,738,127 



Xote: Commitments under uncompleted contracts for the construction of fixed assets 
approximately $50,000,000. 



158 



Appendix II — Financial 



AMALGAMATED 



SUMMARY OF FIXED ASSETS 
January 1, 1962 





In 
Serxice 


Under 
Construction 


Total 


Balances at December 31, 1961: 
Southern Ontario Sv'stem 


$ 

1,931,060,201 
423,758,182 


$ 

52,049,680 
54,741,194 


$ 
1,983,109,881 


Northern Ontario Properties. . . 


478,499,376 






Balances at January 1, 1962 


2,354,818,383 


106,790,874 


2,461,609,257 


Consisting of: 

Power system assets 

Retail distribution plant . . 


2,038,818,051 
278,067,458 

37,932,874 


103,511,195 
2,070,539 

1,209,140 


2,142,329,246 
280,137,997 


Administrative and service land, buildings 
and equipment 


39,142,014 




2,354,818,383 


106,790,874 


2,461,609,257 



ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION 
January 1, 1962 





Power 
System 


Rural 
Power 
District 


Retail 
Distribution 


Administrative 

and Service 

Buildings and 

Equipment 


Total 


Balances at December 31, 
1961: 
Southern Ontario 

System 


$ 

186,433,348 
45,457,681 

1,674,560 


$ 

54,589,839 
9,165,989 

63,755,828 


$ 


8,806,808 
799,486 


$ 
249,829,995 


Northern Ontario 
Properties 




55,423,156 


Transfer to reclassify as 
"Retail Distribution" 
the depreciation ac- 
cumulated on Rural 
Power District and 
Local Distribution 
Svstem assets 


65,430,397 










Balances at January 1, 
1962 


230,216,460 




65,430,397 


9,606,294 


305,253,151 









Note: The accumulated depreciation for the Power System at January 1, 1962 includes a special allowance of $4,210,393 
for estimated capital losses and other costs in connection with 25-cycIe equipment to be retired or converted as 
a result of frequency standardization in the former Southern Ontario System. 



EXCHANGE DISCOUNT (NET) ON FUNDED DEBT 
January 1, 1962 





Discount 


Premium 


Net Discount 


Exchange discount and premium on funded debt 
issued in United States funds: 
Balances at December 31, 1961 — 
Southern Ontario System .... 


% 

5,385,005 
711,656 


$ 

4,716,900 
176,489 


$ 
668,105 


Northern Ontario Properties 


535,167 


Balances at January 1, 1962 


6,096,661 


4,893,389 


1,203,272 



Amalgamated Systems — Sinking Fund Equity 159 

SYSTEMS 

SINKING FUND EQUITY 
January 1, 1962 

Southern Ontario System: 

Balances at December 31, 1961 — ■ 

Power System and Rural Power District $ 335,302,466 

Administrative and service buildings and equipment 4,304,841 



Balance at January 1, 1962 $ 339,607,307 

Northern Ontario Properties: 

Balances at December 31, 1961 — 
Province of Ontario 

—40-year basis $ 46,893,895 

— Prepaid sinking funds 1 2,548,472 

Municipalities supplied with power at cost 15,560,453 

$ 75,002,820 

Deduct transfer of the "Province of Ontario — Prepaid Sinking 
Funds" section of the account to the Reserve for Stabilization 
of Rates and Contingencies (Note) 12,548,472 

Balance at January 1 , 1962 62,454,348 



Amalgamated Systems: 

Balance at January 1, 1962, consolidated into one section called 

"Municipalities and Powar District" $ 402,061,655 



Note: Prior to January 1, 1962 the Province of Ontario had a beneficial interest in the sinking fund equity contributed 
by persons served for its account in the former Northern Ontario Properties. On that date the Commission 
was enabled by Section 4 (1) of The Power Commission's Systems Consolidation Act 1961-62, to transfer and 
allocate such equity as it, in its discretion, might determine for the benefit of such persons. 



AMALGAMATED SYSTEMS 

Surplus arising from the supply of power to customers 

served for the account of the Province of Ontario 

January 1, 1962 

Balance December 31, 1961 $ 318,545 

Deduct transfer to the Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 318,545 

Balance January 1, 1962 NIL 



Note: On January 1, 1962 all the assets in the Northern Ontario Properties previously held in trust for the Province 
of Ontario became vested absolutely in the Commission under Section 2 of The Power Commission's Systems 
Consolidation Act, 1961-62. 



160 



Appendix II — Financial 

THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 



AMALGAMATED 

RESERVE FOR STABILIZATION 
January 1, 





Held for the Benefit of All Customers 




Per Kilowatt of 

1961 Average 

of Monthly 

Peak Loads 


System 

Pool 
(Note 1) 


Rural Power 
District 


Southern Ontario System: 

Balances at December 31, 1961 . . . 


$ 
28.37 


$ 
122,310,373 


$ 
2,249,534 

2,249,534 


Segregation of the Rural Power District sec- 
tion of the reserve between bulk and retail 
customers (Note 3) 








Balances at January 1, 1962 




122,310,373 








Northern Ontario Properties: 

Balances at December 31, 1961 . 


19.95 

8.42 
8.42 


17,933,272 

658,257 
6,906,863 




Reclassification of part of the reserve held 
for the benefit of cost-contract municipali- 
ties in the former Thunder Bay System 
(Note 4) 




Add amounts transferred from other ac- 
counts (Note 5): 
Sinking fund eauity . 




Province of Ontario surplus account 










Balances at January 1, 1962 




25,498,392 








Amalgamated Systems: 

Balances at January 1, 1962 




147,808,765 









Notes: 1. These portions of the reserve which were formerly called "Power System" and "Maximum Power Cost" 
have been renamed "System Pool" and "Low-voltage Cost Relief" respectively to better indicate their 
purpose. 

2. Customers previously described as "Municipal Direct Customers" in the former Southern Ontario System 

are now referred to as "Bulk Customers in Cost-contract Municipalities" (Municipal Bulk Customers ) and 
the portion of the reserve held for their benefit has been retitled accordingly. 

3. As of January 1, 1962, the Rural Power District was renamed the "Power District", and the portion of the 

reserve held for the benefit of its customers in the former Southern Ontario System has been divided 
between Power District Bulk (previously called "Rural Direct") and Retail Customers. The amount of 
$874,023 shown above as being held for the benefit of Power District Bulk Customers represents the net 
income from these customers (plus interest improvement) which was deducted from the cost of power of 
the Rural Power District of the former Southern Ontario System commencing on January 1, 1960, the 
date on which these customers were recognized as a separate category. 

4. On January 1, 1962 all the assets previously held in trust for the municipalities comprised in the former 

Thunder Bay System became vested absolutely in the Commission under Section 2 of The Power Com- 



Amalgamated Systems — Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies Reserve 161 

COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



SYSTEMS 

OF RATES AND CONTINGENCIES 
1962 



Held for the Benefit of Certain Groups of Customers 




Cost-contract MunicipaHties 


Bulk Customers 


Retail 
Customers 




Low-voltage 

Cost Relief 

(Note 1) 


Former 

Thunder Bay 

System 


In Cost- 
contract 
Municipalities 
(Note 2) 


In Power 
District 
(Note 3) 


In Power 
District 
(Note 3) 


Total 


$ 
461,032 


$ 


1,076,696 


$ 


$ 


$ 
126,097,635 






874,023 


1,375,511 












461,032 




1,076,696 


874,023 


1,375,511 


126,097,635 










1,161,918 
669,207 








19,095,190 


10,950 










576,623 


1,158,495 
65,413 


3,906,491 
220,574 




12,548,472 


32,558 






318,545 










620,131 


492,711 


1,223,908 


4,127,065 




31,962,207 








1,081.163 


492,711 


2,300,604 


5,001,088 


1,375,511 


158,059,842 



I 



mission's Systems Consolidation Act, 1961-62. The reclassification of part of the reserve held for the 
benefit of cost-contract municipalities in that system ($658,257 to system pool and $10,950 to low-voltage 
cost relief) has been made to permit these municipalities to share in these portions of the reserve equally 
(at $28.37 per kilowatt in the case of System Pool) with the customers of the former Southern 
Ontario System. 
5. The amount of $12,548,472 transferred from sinking fund equity represents the balance of prepaid sinking 
funds at December 31, 1961 accumulated by charges to customers served for the account of the Province 
of Ontario in the former Northern Ontario Properties. Of this amount, $6,906,863 has been allocated to 
System Pool to permit all customers in the former Northern Ontario Properties other than cost-contract 
municipalities in the former Thunder Bay System (see Note 4 ) to share equally with the other beneficiaries 
in this section of the reserve at $28.37 per kilowatt. The remainder and the December 31, 1961 balance of 
$318,545 transferred from the Province of Ontario Surplus Account, have been allocated to Low-voltage 
Cost Relief, Municipal Bulk, and Power District Bulk sections of the reserve in proportion to the 1961 
average of monthly peak loads of the following groups of customers in the former Northern Ontario 
Properties: (a) Municipalities, except those served on cost contracts in the former Thunder Bay System 
(b) Municipal Bulk Customers and (c) all customers in the Power District. 



APPENDIX III— RURAL 



POWER is delivered in wholesale quantities by the Commission to 97 rural oper- 
ating areas in the Rural Power District. Within the areas, retail customers are 
supplied under the following six classes of service: farm, hamlet residential, rural 
residential, commercial, summer, and industrial power. The description of these 
classes of service and the rates applicable to them at December 31, 1961 are 
included in this appendix. 

Description a£ Main Classes of Service 

Farm service means service rendered to a property used for the production 
of food or industrial crops. It provides for the electrical supply of all farm buildings 
and equipment located on a farm and used for farm purposes, including equipment 
required for processing the products of that farm. Service may be supplied under 
one farm contract to all dwellings or separate domestic establishments located on 
the farm and occupied by persons engaged in its operation. Additional dwellings 
or domestic establishments located on a farm property and occupied by persons 
otherwise engaged are classed as residential service. Small properties of thirty 
acres and under are classified as residential service unless special circumstances 
warrant a classification as farm service. 

Hamlet residential service is supplied to all domestic establishments in built- 
up areas where there are six or more customers in any quarter-mile section of road. 

Rural residential service is supplied to isolated domestic establishments served 
as part of a rural operating area. 

Commercial service applies to a wide variety of business or community 
establishments such as hotels, offices, stores, churches, schools, or small manu- 
facturing and processing plants. Sign and display lighting is included. 

Summer service is applicable to residential properties normally used only 
during the summer months. 

162 



Rates for Rural Electrical Service 163 

Industrial power service is 3-phase service to such power users as creameries, 
cheese factories, chopping mills, and other industrial establishments. 

Rural Rate Structure 

Rural rates in effect throughout the Province are given in the accompanying 
tables. They are quoted on a monthly basis, except the rate for summer service, 
which is quoted on an annual basis. Each contract within each class of service has 
a rating, and the energy used is billed for the most part on the basis of a three- 
step energy rate, the bill being subject to a monthly minimum, or with respect to 
summer service, to an annual fixed charge. The number of kilowatt-hours billed 
at the first and second energy rates and the amount of the minimum monthly bill, 
or the annual fixed charge, depend on the contract rating. For contracts with a 
demand rating (CD, and Industrial Power) these aspects of the bill are based on 
measured demand and are subject to minima related to demands established in 
previous billing periods. 

For industrial power service there are eight different schedules. These are 
numbered in the following table. The alphabetical list of the 97 rural operating 
areas indicates the schedule number of the power service rate applicable to each 
area, as at December 31, 1961. 



164 



Appendix III — Rural 



Rural Power District 

RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

as at December 31, 1961 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis for all services except summer service, which are 
quoted on an annual basis. All are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 



Class and rating 



Hamlet 
Residential 

H20 (see note). 
H 

Rural 
Residential 

R20 (see note).. 
R 

Commercial 

C20 (see note). . 

C35 

C50 

CD 

Farm— Part I 

(Monthly con- 
sumption 2000 
kwh or less) 
F 

—Part II 
(Monthly con- 
sumption greater 
than 2,000 kwh 
min. demand 
10 kw) 
FD 



Summer (on 

annual basis) 
S 



Number of kilowatt-hours per month billed at 
uniform kwh rate shown 



A.Si 



60 
90 
150 

15* 



60 



225 § 



2M 



80 
180 



80 
180 



120 

180 

300 

30* 



180 



6755 



1.1^ 



500 
500 



1.5^ 



All addl. 



All addl. 



All addl. 



All addl. 



All addl. 



1.7(^ 



200* 



0.5c 



All addl 



e r ^ 

11% 



1.67 
2.25 



1.67 
2.25 



1.50 

2.25 

3.75 

.40 ■• 



2.25 



44.44 §t 



Net monthly bill for 



100 kwh 300 kwh 500 kwh 



3.37 
3.37 



3.37 
3.37 



3.37 
3.88 
4.05 



5.89 
7.24 



6.46 
7.45 



6.86 
8.26 
9.58 
9.58t 



7.87 
9.22 



9.16 
10.15 



9.56 
10.96 
13.77 
13.77t 



3.37 7.45 10.15 

Net monthly bill for 



2,000 
kwh 



3,000 
kwh 



$ $ $ 

30.60t 35. lot 39.60t 



Net annual bill for 



4,000 
kwh 



500 
kwh 



40.00 



750 
kwh 



$ 
41.40 



1,000 
kwh 



46.26 



Industrial Power 



Schedule 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 









.- 


•"• ^ 


1) 


x: 


-= ^ 


2 


S -^ 


^ 2. 






^ ^ 


TS 


o-g 






IS 


oa 






$ 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 


50* 


50* 


1.35 



Energy rate 
per kwh for 






2.3 
2.6 
2.8 
3.1 
3.4 
3.7 
4.0 
4.6 






1.5 
1.7 
1.8 
2.0 
2.2 
2.4 
2.6 
3.0 



•a 



i 

0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 



Net monthly bill for 
use of 1 kw of demand 



100 
hours 



$ 
2.92 
3.15 
3.28 
3.51 
3.73 
3.96 
4.18 
4.63 



200 
hours 



$ 
3.22 
3.45 
3.58 
3.81 
4.03 
4.26 
4.48 
4.93 



300 
hours 



$ 
3.52 
3.74 
3.88 
4.10 
4.33 
4.55 
4.78 
5.23 



§Per year *Per kw of demand 

^Includes annual fixed charge of $22.22 tCalculated on basis of minimum demand of 10 kw 

Note — The H20, R20. and C20 rates were discontinued as of January 1, 1959 except for existing 2-wire services 
at that date. 



Rates for Rural Electrical Service 

Area Industrial Power Service Schedules in Effect 



165 



Rural operating 
area 



Algoma 

Alliston 

Arnprior ... 
Atikokan ... 
Aylmer 

Bala 

Bancroft ... 

Barrie 

Beachville . . 
Beamsv'ille . . 

Belleville. . . . 
Blenheim . . . 
Bowmanville 
Bracebridge . 
Brampton. . . 

Brantford . . 
Brockville . . . 
Cannington . . 

Cayuga 

Chatham ... 

Clinton 

Cobden 

Coburg 

Delta 

Dryden 

Dundas 

Dunnvn'lle . 

Elmira 

Essex 

Exeter 

Fenelon Falls 

Forest 

Fort Frances 
Frankford . . . 
Gerald ton . . . 



Schedule 



Rural operating 
area 



Guelph 

Huntsville 

Kapuskasing. . . 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Kirkland Lake . . 

Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lancaster 

Listowel 

London 

Lucan 

Manitoulin 

Markdale 

Markham 

Matheson 

Merlin 

Merrickville . . . . 

Minden 

Napanee 

New Liskeard . . . 

North Bay 

Norwood 

Oil Springs 

Orangeville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound . . . 
Parry Sound. . . 

Penetanguishene 

Perth 

Peterborough . . . 

Picton 

Port Arthur . . . . 



Schedule 



Rural operating 
area 



Richmond Hill 

Ridgetown 

St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Stayner 

Stoney Creek 

Caledonia Section 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Sudbury 

Sutton 

Terrace Ba^' 

Tillsonburg 

Timmins 

Tweed 

Uxbridge 

VankleekHill 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Warren 

Welland 

West Lome 

Winchester 

W'ingham 

Woodbridge 



Schedule 



166 



Appendix III — Rural 



Rural Power District 

MILES OF LINE, NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS 

as at December 31, 1961 





Miles of 

primary 

line 


Number of customers 


Rural operating 
areas by regions 


Farm 


Residential 


Com- 
mercial 


Summer 


Power 




Rural 


Hamlet 


Com- 
mercial 


Other 


Total 


Southern 

Ontario SysteiM 

WESTERN 

Aylmer 

Beachville 

Blenheim 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Essex 


336.71 
498.75 
14L82 
313.18 
801.48 

928.88 
275.79 
341.21 
473.29 
382.80 

395.29 
364.49 
371.56 
309.37 
290.35 

678.22 
531.36 
465.82 
470.94 
503.44 


1,594 
1,849 
655 
1,360 
3,135 

5,022 
1,225 
1,408 
1,950 
1,458 

1,646 
1,493 
1,414 
1,219 
1,197 

2,936 
1,979 
1,958 
1,804 
1,844 


230 
177 
145 
380 
170 

500 

48 

100 

418 

97 

204 
80 
175 
237 
149 

193 
297 
421 
338 
115 


1,030 

1,260 

474 

961 

1,086 

5,323 
370 
257 

1,675 
172 

431 

266 

497 

1,345 

2,767 

999 

780 

1,233 

1,409 

281 


239 
300 
118 

255 
407 

825 
147 
140 
392 
114 

250 
212 
212 
245 
366 

370 
271 
353 
368 
228 


12 

4 

13 

9 

102 
11 
56 

3 
""28 
" 11 

1 


135 

32 

262 

"894 

3,436 

513 

1,118 

32 

413 

"634 

14 

502 

"375 
67 


11 
23 
10 
13 
19 

8 
54 

7 

19 
25 
12 
10 
20 

22 
12 
29 
23 
14 


3,251 
3,645 
1,677 
2,969 
5,720 

15,343 
2,329 
3,087 


Forest 


London 

Lucan ... 


4,521 
1,848 


Merlin 

Oil Springs 

Ridgetown 

St. Thomas .... 
Sarnia 


2,966 
2,076 
2,972 
3,070 
5,012 


Stratford 

Strathroy 

Tillsonburg 

Wallaceburg. . . . 
West Lome. . . . 


4,520 
3,339 
3,994 
4,318 
2,549 


Total 


8,874.75 


37,146 


4,474 


22,616 


5,812 


250 


8,427 


481 


79,206 


NIAGARA AND 

WEST CENTRAL 

Beamsville 

Brantford 

Cayuga 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Elmira. 


380.52 
558.32 
536.89 
382.12 
280.43 

501.07 
399.46 
473.14 
674.01 
209.06 

805.23 
278.62 
421.77 


1,980 
2,227 
2,002 
1,728 
1,087 

1,681 
1,348 
1,632 
2,878 
1,226 

3,493 

986 

1,321 


265 
509 
287 
304 
292 

195 
343 
282 
118 
183 

1,032 
206 
470 


2,903 
964 
887 

4,134 
781 

1,303 
1,609 
2,510 
758 
2,257 

2,538 
5,089 
3,454 


402 
351 
294 
359 
230 

311 
265 
411 
368 
296 

547 
478 
486 


2 

4 

23 

""68 

15 

2 

54 

1 

36 


68 
17 

1,685 
3 

1,277 

304 

16 

172 

111 

202 

1,728 
125 
832 


48 
10 
28 
44 
14 

22 
17 
54 
24 
34 

28 
69 
50 


5,668 
4,082 
5,206 
6,572 
3,749 

3 831 


Guelph 

Kitchener 

Listowel 

St. Catharines . . 

Simcoe . . . 


3,598 
5,061 
4,259 
4,198 

9,420 


Stoney Creek. . . 
Welland 


6,954 
6,649 


Total 


5,900.64 


23,589 


4,486 


29,187 


4,798 


205 


6,540 


442 


69,247 




MNITOUl. 

.^^X^ NORTHEASTERN 
REGION 



PARRY SOUND 



GEORGIAN 



HUNTSVILLE 



L A \K E 



H U '. R O N 
I 



GEORGIAN BAY 

REGION Kj^ 



BRACEBRIDGE 




OWEN SOUND 



WALKERTON 



,?J*YN!R f BARRIE 



VANKLEEK HILL 



SHELBURNE 



flERRICKVILLEj 



WINCHESTER 



'^PETERBOROUGH! 



r y^ ^< 


US3 - 583 / STRATHROY 19 


J yX WALLACEBURG 


">y* — \ ~" 




-* Z. west"lorne\st.^thom^ 


^V...^„^^^^CHATHAM ' 


Vridgetown ^^^A**"—**-. 


ESSEX / MERLIN ^^ f^^ 


A/'^^"^^ 



IbrantfordV 






CENTRAL REGION 



> EASTERN REGION 



WESTERN REGION 



'ST. CATHARINES 

WEST CENTRAL-^ 
NIAGARA REGION 



^ .^EAST CENTRAL REGION / 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 
OF ONTARIO 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

SHOWING 

RURAL OPERATING AREAS 



Miles of Un 

Rural Operating Are 

Farm Customei 

Non-Fdrm Customei 



166 



Rural op( 
areas by i 



Southern 
Ontario 

WESTERN 

A\lmer . 
Beachvil 
Blenhein 
Chathan 
Clinton . 

Essex. . . 
Exeter. . 
Forest . . 
London . 
Lucan . . 

Merlin. . 
Oil Sprii 
Ridgetov 
St. ThoT 
Sarnia . . 

Stratford 
Strathro] 
Tillsonbi 
Wallaceh 
West Lo 

Total . 



NIAGARA AI 
WEST CE] 

Beamsvii 
Bran tf or 
Cayuga . 
Dundas. 
Dunnvill 

Elmira. . 
Guelph . 
Kitchene 
Listowel 
St. Cath; 

Simcoe . . 
Stoney C 
Welland. 

Total. 



I 



Miles of Line and I\ umber of Customers 



167 



Rural Power District 
MILES OF LINE, NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS 
as at December 31, 1961 





Miles of 

primary 

line 


Number of customers 


Rural operating 
areas by regions 


Farm 


Residential 


Com- 
mercial 


Summer 


Power 




Rural 


Hamlet 


Com- 
mercial 


Other 


Total 


Southern 

Ontario System 

— Continued 
central 

Bowmanville. . . . 

Brampton 

Markham 

Oshawa 

Richmond Hill. . 

Sutton 


324.93 
522.49 
320.95 
274.75 
318.35 

357.54 
414.22 


966 
1,642 
993 
808 
934 

1,002 
1,164 


294 
810 
446 
395 
280 

323 
524 


1,063 
2,617 
5,174 
2,917 
7,774 

3,058 
3,666 


221 
411 
510 

352 
721 

387 
652 


27 
21 
33 
11 
4 

110 


104 
180 
503 
152 
185 

3,386 
76 


17 
92 
52 
36 
102 

22 
109 


2,692 
5,773 
7,711 
4,671 
10,000 

8,288 
6,191 


Wood bridge .... 


Total 


2,533.23 


7,509 


3,072 


26,269 


3,254 


206 


4,586 


430 


45,326 


GEORGIAN BAY 

Alliston 

Bala 


502.46 
283.33 
522.69 
516.41 
502.07 

653.94 
662.10 
524.93 
611.48 
959.28 

491.70 
565.54 
727.75 
368.41 
510.91 

861.97 
704.96 


1,975 

10 

1,453 

309 

1,216 

651 
2,273 
1,390 

996 

2,525 

207 

963 

2,408 

1,186 

1,576 

3,185 
2,667 


326 
163 
618 
495 
290 

596 
200 
482 
489 
364 

467 
364 
202 
151 
338 

294 
86 


884 

582 

2,729 

1,099 

964 

1,405 

721 

1,321 

2.555 
1,630 

1,072 
1,084 
245 
1,188 
1,075 

839 
684 


241 
115 
463 
229 

254 

360 
331 
371 
497 
559 

267 
269 
228 
264 
284 

410 

337 


7 

101 

89 

138 

47 

194 

13 

10 

136 

167 

155 

175 

2 

243 

24 

25 
31 


34 
3,073 
3,761 
3,461 
3,159 

2,877 

780 

486 

4,167 

3,784 

1,687 
5,890 
90 
3,456 
1,648 

782 
841 


19 

3 
27 
13 
13 

17 
14 
19 
18 
19 

14 
9 

""6 
15 

17 
10 


3,486 
4,047 
9 140 


Barrie ... 


Bracebridge .... 
Cannington 

Huntsville 

Markdale 

Orangeville 

Orillia 


5,744 
5,943 

6,100 
4,332 
4,079 
8,858 
9,048 

3,869 
8,754 
3,175 
6,494 
4,960 

5,552 
4,656 


Owen Sound. . . . 

Parry Sound. . . . 
Penetanguishene 

Shelburne 

Stayner 

Uxbridge 

Walkerton 

Wingham 


Total 


9,969.93 


24,990 


5,925 


20,077 


5,479 


1,557 


39,976 


233 


98,237 



168 



Appendix III — Rural 



Rural Power District 

MILES OF LINE, NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS 

as at December 31, 1961 





Miles of 

primary 

line 


Number of customers 


Rural operating 
areas by regions 


Farm 


Residential 


Com- 
mercial 


Summer 


Power 




Rural 


Hamlet 


Com- 
mercial 


Other 


Total 


Southern 
Ontario System 
— Concluded 

EAST central 

Bancroft 

Belleville 

Cobourg 

Fenelon Falls. . . 
Frankford 

Kingston 

Lakefield 

Minden 

Napanee 

Norwood 

Peterborough . . . 
Picton . 


525.92 
216.79 
606.58 
544.53 
595.91 

908.83 
486.87 
548.60 
585.53 
401.45 

676.56 
479.65 
631.66 


612 

790 

1,694 

1,037 

1,996 

2,011 
558 
357 

1,938 
958 

1,790 
1,735 
1,161 


300 
212 
516 
134 
439 

539 
233 
315 
339 
177 

361 
401 
584 


1,280 
1,489 
1,529 
797 
1,535 

4,889 

684 

1,380 

1,270 

425 

2,767 

1,521 

804 


229 
252 
331 
259 
362 

728 
192 
357 
419 
142 

444 
323 
333 


96 

3 

78 

152 

37 

59 

108 

157 

41 

42 

80 

78 

133 


1,500 

47 

1,088 

3,903 

557 

1,787 
3,625 
4,053 
483 
1,430 

1,467 
823 
990 


6 
19 

17 
11 
14 

59 
1 

5 
11 

5 

33 

15 

2 


4,023 
2,812 
5,253 
6,293 
4,940 

10,072 
5,401 
6,624 
4,501 
3,179 

6,942 
4,896 


Tweed 


4,007 






Total 


7,208.88 


16,637 


4.550 


20,370 


4,371 


1,064 


21,753 


198 


68,943 


eastern 

Arnprior 

Brockville 

Cobden 

Delta 

Lancaster 

Merrickville .... 

Ottawa 

Perth 

Vankleek Hill... 
Winchester 


452.86 
620.53 
1,237.23 
469.37 
609.54 

299.99 
821.75 
891.90 
609.83 
837.95 


1,035 
2,096 
2,555 
1,049 
2,263 

811 
2,364 
1,980 
2,475 
3,327 


242 

525 
696 

257 
514 

174 
930 
342 
291 
350 


1,174 
2,189 
3,285 
641 
1,410 

614 
11,161 

864 
1,411 
1,712 


310 
470 
787 
259 

457 

159 
932 
388 
527 
560 


42 
43 
127 
64 
14 

1 

9 

57 

13 

1 


1,573 
1,020 
1,426 
1,406 
447 

272 

406 

2,113 

187 

81 


22 
31 

37 

7 

35 

9 

122 

12 

34 

47 


4,398 
6,374 
8,913 
3,683 
5,140 

2,040 
15,924 
5,756 
4,938 
6,078 


Total 


6,850.95 


19,955 


4,321 


24,461 


4,849 


371 


8,931 


356 


63,244 



Miles of Line and I\ umber of Customers 



169 



Rural Power District 

MILES OF LINE, NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS 

as at December 31, 1961 





Miles of 

primary 

line 


Number of customers 


Rural operating 
areas by regions 


F'arm 


Residential 


Com- 
mercial 


Summer 


Power 




Rural 


Hamlet 


Com- 
mercial 


Other 


Total 


Northern 
Ontario 
Properties 

NORTHEASTERN 

Algoma 

Kapuskasing. . . . 
Kirkland Lake . . 

Manitoulin 

Matheson 

New Liskeard . . . 

North Bay 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

Warren 


334.17 
251.68 
126.95 
597.23 
501.64 

645.54 
823.43 
606.01 
86.36 
518.17 


379 
523 
82 
848 
906 

1,260 

1,097 

383 

147 

904 


159 

252 

71 

278 

342 

427 

864 

1,177 

31 

470 


3,981 
2,405 

289 
1,508 

685 

1,066 
3,749 
7,715 
713 
1,342 


617 
303 
91 
526 
219 

376 
584 
740 
84 
399 


41 
14 
19 
96 
9 

47 
156 

10 

1 

111 


310 

285 
352 
784 
324 

426 

1,296 

1,271 

87 

919 


63 
14 

5 

24 

8 

18 
50 
45 
12 
14 


5,550 
3,796 
909 
4,064 
2,493 

3,620 
7,796 
11,341 
1,075 
4,159 


Total 


4,491.18 


6,529 


4,071 


23,453 


3,939 


504 


6,054 


253 


44,803 


NORTHWESTERN 

Atikokan 

Dryden 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Kenora 

Port Arthur .... 
Terrace Bay .... 


17.22 
342.85 
555.45 
136.40 
276.87 

880.63 
29.29 


' ' ' 383 
907 

'"l80 

1,099 


28 
412 
331 

19 
303 

1,365 

1 


79 
867 
536 
717 
701 

2,533 
598 


32 
260 
300 
251 
186 

451 
92 


7 

53 

43 

10 

135 

14 
3 


18 
342 
115 

18 
951 

1,310 
11 


1 
11 

3 
23 
12 

26 
6 


165 

2,328 
2,235 
1,038 
2,468 

6,798 
711 


Total 


2,238.71 


2,569 


2,459 


6,031 


1,572 


265 


2,765 


82 


15,743 



SUMMARY— MILES OF LINE, NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS 
as at December 31, 1961 





Miles of 

primary 

line 






Number of customers 






System 
and Region 


Farm 


Residential 


Com- 
mercial 


Summer 


Power 




Rural 


Hamlet 


Com- 
mercial 


Other 


Total 


Southern 
Ontario System 

Western 

Niagara and 
West Central . 

Central 

Georgian Bay. . . 

East Central 

Eastern 


8,874.75 

5.900.64 
2,533.23 
9,969.93 
7,208.88 
6,850.95 


37,146 

23,589 
7,509 
24,990 
16,637 
19,955 


4,474 

4,486 
3,072 
5,925 
4,550 
4,321 


22,616 

29,187 
26,269 
20,077 
20,370 
24,461 


5,812 

4,798 
3,254 
5,479 
4,371 
4,849 


250 

205 

206 

1,557 

1,064 

371 


8,427 

6.540 

4,586 

39,976 

21,753 

8,931 


481 

442 
430 
233 
198 
356 


79,206 

69,247 
45,326 
98,237 
68,943 
63,244 


Total 


41,338.38 


129,826 


26,828 


142,980 


28,563 


3,653 


90,213 


2,140 


424,203 


Northern 
Ontario 
Properties 
Northeastern . . . 
Northwestern. . . 


4,491.18 
2,238.71 


6,529 
2,569 


4,071 
2,459 


23,453 
6,031 


3,939 
1,572 


504 
265 


6,054 
2,765 


253 
82 


44,803 
15,743 


Total 


6,729.89 


9,098 


6,530 


29,484 


5,511 


769 


8,819 


335 


60,546 


Total — All systems 


48,068.27 


138,924 


33,358 


172,464 


34,074 


4,422 


99,032 


2,475 


484,749 



170 Appendix III — Rural 

Rural Electrical Service 1952 - 1961 
CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, AND CONSUMPTION, BY CLASSES OF SERVICE 













Monthly- 










Consump- 




consump- 


Average 


Class of service 


Year 


Revenue 


tion 


Customers 


tion per 
customer 


cost 
per kwh 






$ 


kwh 


No. 


la\h 





*Farm 


1952 


9,017,321.17 


465,813,826 


129,451 


307 


1.94 




1953 


11,053,487.41 


507,669,118 


133,522 


322 


2.18 




1954 


12,207,502.58 


558,217,490 


136,013 


345 


2.19 




1955 


12,915,852.58 


593,811,741 


138,648 


360 


2.18 




1956 


13,671,336.65 


642,704,082 


139,289 


385 


2.13 




1957 


14,386,097.14 


685,873,991 


140,604 


408 


2.10 




1958 


15,159,553.04 


739,105,332 


140,343 


439 


2.05 




1959 


16,122,453.84 


804,044,121 


140,892 


477 


2.01 




1960 


16,688,958.79 


850,192,892 


140,782 


503 


1.96 




1961 


17,367,400.00 


909,189,400 


138,924 


542 


1.91 


♦Hamlet & Rural 














Residential 


1952 


7,253,640.00 


359,033,745 


133,193 


233 


2.02 




1953 


9,560,018.46 


421,976,886 


150,627 


248 


2.27 




1954 


11,194,393.02 


497,941,047 


160,552 


267 


2.25 




1955 


12,734,130.77 


577,738,311 


177,398 


285 


2.20 




1956 


14,639,910.88 


689,671,299 


181,113 


321 


2.12 




1957 


16,174,554.38 


780,555,465 


196,025 


345 


2.07 




1958 


17,732,046.03 


905,276,590 


207.570 


374 


1.90 




1959 


18,862,773.02 


988,315,209 


218,287 


387 


1.91 




1960 


20,151,434.03 


1,070,637,716 


, 221,915 


405 


1.88 




1961 


20,494,966.00 


1,096,653,000 


205,822 


427 


1.87 


♦Commercial 


1952 


2,457,032.13 


125,448,544 


24,564 


468 


1.96 


(including Summer 


1953 


3,385,239.46 


148,684,777 


28,870 


464 


2.28 


Commercial) 


1954 


3,707,824.28 


165,641,656 


30,403 


466 


2.24 




1955 


3,996,936.76 


186,152,293 


32,509 


493 


2.15 




1956 


4,444,185.15 


210,438,942 


33,481 


532 


2.11 




1957 


4,855,540.79 


232,393,971 


35,179 


564 


2.09 




1958 


5,346,040.16 


259,521,563 


36,966 


600 


2.06 




1959 


5,764,611.07 


282,562,584 


38,176 


627 


2.04 




1960 


6,099,889.90 


301,874,591 


38,887 


653 


2.02 




1961 


6,425,565.00 


324,871,900 


38,496 


700 


1.98 


*Summer 


1952 


I 826 359.64 


40 160,959 


55,159 


64 


4.55 




1953 


l!833!881.12 


34,136,058 


57,547 


51 


5.37 




1954 


2,034,199.00 


38,459,711 


62,183 


54 


5.29 




1955 


2,214,360.48 


40,375,690 


68,600 


51 


5.48 




1956 


2,478,450.51 


45,989,565 


74,390 


54 


5.39 




1957 


2,709,831.47 


50,673,331 


79,792 


55 


5.35 




1958 


2,943,051.21 


55,170,379 


85,611 


56 


5.33 




1959 


3,170,306.65 


60,345,721 


91,390 


57 


5.25 




1960 


4,141,665.36 


67,785,615 


95,196 


61 


6.11 




1961 


4,358,812.00 


74,693,800 


99,032 


64 


5.84 


Industrial Power 


1952 


1,799,924.89 


102,608,301 


1,170 


7,6^6 


1.75 




1953 


2,147,899.48 


121,310,479 


1,289 


8,222 


1.77 




1954 


2,545,737.21 


148,176,508 


1,466 


8,964 


1.72 




1955 


2,934,852.81 


171,202,169 


1,681 


9,067 


1.71 




1956 


3,402,416.31 


207,252,224 


1,782 


9,975 


1.64 




1957 


3,732,252.41 


225,748,793 


2,011 


9,920 


1.65 




1958 


4,410,317.84 


278,005,882 


2,113 


11,235 


1.59 




1959 


4,612,172.64 


287,458,107 


2,325 


10,795 


1.60 




1960 


5.017,774.81 


325,416,458 


2,511 


11,215 


1.54 




1961 


5,414,240.00 


354,069,300 


2,475 


11,835 


1.53 



* Beginning in 1959, consumption for flat-rate water-heaters was estimated on the basis of 16.8 
hours' daily use instead of 20 hours' daily use as previously. The data for previous years have 
been adjusted to the new basis. 



APPENDIX IV— LEGISLATIVE 



AT THE 1960-61 Session of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of 
Ontario one Act respecting The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of On- 
tario was passed. The Act is reproduced here in full, the short title being as follows: 

The Power Commission Amendment Act, 1960-1961, Chapter 78. 



ACT 

CHAPTER 78 

An Act to amend The Power Commission Act 

Assented to March 29th, 1961. 
Session Prorogued March 29th, 1961. 



H 



ER MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legis- 
lative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, enacts as follows: 



1. Subsection 7 of section 48 of The Power Commission Act is ^-^.g^ ^l^% 
repealed and the following substituted therefor: re-^enacted 

(7) Subject to subsections la and lb, the payments received ^/'^J;^^;;;;^';^ 
under subsections 2, 3, 4 and 5 shall be credited by the ^^"^J/jJ^^ 
municipal corporation to its general fund. 

(7^/) The portion of the payments received under subsections idem. 
2, 3, 4 and 5 that is attributable to levies for county pur- portion 
poses shall be paid by the municipal corporation to the 
county that would have been entitled thereto if the land 
had been assessed and taxed in the usual way. 

171 



172 



Appendix IV — Legislative 



Idem, 

elementary 
or secondary 
school 
portion 



(lb) The portion of the payments received under subsection 
2 in respect of dwelhng houses, including farm properties, 
rented by the Commission to other persons that is attribu- 
table to levies for elementary or secondary school purposes, 
shall be paid by the municipal corporation to the school 
boards that would have been entitled thereto if the land 
had been assessed and taxed in the usual way, and for the 
purposes of this subsection the tenants of such dwelling 
houses and farm properties shall be deemed to be rated 
as tenants on the assessment roll of the municipality. 



Use of 
valuations 
for com- 
puting rates 



(7c) The valuations made under this section shall be used for 
the purpose of computing county rates, school rates and 
legislative grants in all respects as though the properties 
valued were not exempt from taxation for such purposes. 



Pupil's 
status 



(Id) Where a school board is entitled to a payment under sub- 
section lb with respect to the property in which a pupil 
resides with his parent or guardian, any child whose parent 
or guardian is the tenant of the property shall be deemed 
to be a resident pupil under the jurisdiction of such school 
board. 



Commence- 
ment 



2. This Act shall be deemed to have come into force on the 1st 
day of January, 1961. 



Short title 3^ jj^jg ^^t may be cited as TJie Power Commission Amendment 

Act, 1960-61. 



Order in Council 173 

ORDER IN COUNCIL 

The agreements between The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
and municipalities and corporations mentioned in the list hereunder given were 
approved by Order in Council. 

Cities 

Ottawa July 17, 1951 

Sudbury Sept. 13, 1961 

Town 

Coniston Feb. 6, 1961 

Villages 

Killaloe Station Jan. 10, 1961 

South River Apr. 21, 1961 

Corporations 

Agnico Mines Limited Jan. 16, 1961 

Agnico Mines Limited Oct. 4, 1961 

Armstrong Bros. Company Limited Dec. 29, 1961 

Atlas Steels Limited Aug. 1, 1961 

Atlas Steels Limited Aug. 1, 1961 

Canada Cement Company, Limited Jan. 4, 1961 

Canada Crushed & Cut Stone Limited July 1, 1959 

Canadian Industries, Limited Oct. 18, 1961 

Canadian Rock Salt Company Limited June 12, 1961 

Dryden Chemicals Limited July 14, 1961 

Ethyl Corporation of Canada Limited Dec. 22, 1961 

Falconbridge Nickel Mines, Limited Feb. 2, 1961 

Faraday Uranium Mines Limited Feb. 28, 1961 

Gray, James Joseph Jan. 12, 1961 

Her Majesty the Queen in right of the Province of Ontario, represented by 

the Minister of Public Works for the Province of Ontario Dec. 29, 1961 

Huronian Company, Limited and International Nickel Company of Canada, 

Limited Jan. 16, 1961 

Huronian Company, Limited and International Nickel Company of Canada, 

Limited Jan. 16, 1961 

International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited Dec. 21, 1961 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation Limited Feb. 10, 1961 

Marathon Corporation of Canada Limited Jan. 31, 1961 

Minnesota and Ontario Paper Company June 15, 1961 

National Research Council Apr. 11, 1961 

Nichols Chemical Company, Limited June 1, 1959 

Noranda Mines, Limited July 11, 1961 

Norton Company Dec. 28, 1961 

Ontario-Minnesota Pulp and Paper Company Limited Dec. 31, 1960 

Orenda Engines Limited May 11, 1961 

Rio Algom Mines Limited Oct. 18, 1961 



SUPPLEMENT 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 



As noted in the Foreword to the report, retail service to the relatively more 
populous areas of the Province is for the most part the responsibility of the 
354 municipal electrical utilities supplied at wholesale by the Commission. These 
municipal utilities at December 31, 1961 were serving a total of 1,423,427 retail 
customers. At the year end the Commission itself was providing retail service to 
an additional 30,508 customers through the facilities of 28 Commission-owned 
local distribution systems, bringing the combined total of ultimate customers served 
by all municipal systems to 1,453,935. Since the difference between the municipal 
utilities and the local systems is administrative rather than functional, both types 
of retail service are considered together in the two paragraphs that follow and in 
the statistical tables included in this supplement. Financial reports, however, are 
given only for the municipal utilities served under cost or fixed-rate contracts. 

The numbers in the various customer groups that contribute to these totals 
reflect reclassifications of customers being made in conjunction with the introduc- 
tion of new rate schedules. The purpose of these reclassifications is that certain 
industrial power customers, for example small processing companies such as dairies 
and bakeries, shall be classified as commercial service, and that commercial service 
customers with connected loads of less than 5 kilowatts may be billed under resi- 
dential service. The table on page 176 provides some indication of the growth in 
residential, commercial, and industrial power service over a 10-year period. The 
statistical information relative to energy consumption and unit cost for these three 
main classes of service is reproduced in the graphs on page 177. 

Increases in revenue from residential and industrial power service customers 
at 6.8 per cent and 8.1 per cent were closely related to increases in energy con- 
sumption so that the average cost per kilowatt-hour to the customer remained 
unchanged. For commercial service the corresponding increases were 10.9 per cent 

175 



176 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical Utilities and Local Systems 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, AND CONSUMPTION 
1952 to 1961 













Monthly 


Average 


Service 


Year 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Customers 


consump- 
tion per 
customer 


cost 
per kwh 






$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 





Residential 


1952 


36,811,115 


3,411,685,705 


836,802 


340 


1.08 




1953 


44,647,668 


3,734,160,562 


877,323 


355 


1.20 




1954 


50,833,346 


4,246,511,375 


930,674 


380 


1.20 




1955 


55,241,247 


4,667,789,930 


970,829 


401 


1.18 




1956 


61,234,494 


5,191,581,628 


1,031,482 


419 


1.18 




1957 


65,842,103 


5,602,672,756 


1,072,868 


435 


1.18 




1958 


69,804,608 


6,036,470,489 


1,139,061 


442 


1.16 




1959 


73,955,229 


6,540,969,291 


1,194,878 


456 


1.13 




1960 


78,337,615 


6,944,659,090 


1,234,903 


469 


1.13 




1961 


83,682,550 


7,400,028,084 


1,307,893 


472 


1.13 


Commercial 


1952 


19,502,920 


1,387,136,211 


115,304 


1,003 


1.41 




1953 


23,603,194 


1,526,535,177 


119,498 


1,065 


1.55 




1954 


26,293,250 


1,694,071,712 


123,884 


1,140 


1.55 




1955 


28,576,115 


1,858,974,388 


127,913 


1,211 


1.54 




1956 


31,423,691 


2,081,200,929 


127,497* 


1,360 


1.51 




1957 


33,901,487 


2,270,913,902 


124,757* 


1,517 


1.49 




1958 


35,968,060 


2,445,225,765 


122,446* 


1,664 


1.47 




1959 


38,079,501 


2,669,327,226 


120,733* 


1,842 


1.43 




1960 


41,229,320 


2,921,670,317 


123,441* 


1,972 


1.41 




1961 


45,718,484 


3,289,119,534 


122,863* 


2,231 


1.39 


Industrial Power 


1952 


31,403,227 


3,619,518,306 


20,055 


15,040 


0.87 




1953 


38,482,884 


3,948,124,809 


20,885 


15,753 


0.98 




1954 


40,855,075 


4,089,513,923 


21,671 


15,726 


1.00 




1955 


44,270,882 


4,637,527,118 


22,237 


17,379 


0.96 




1956 


47,808,610 


5,140,704,025 


22,809* 


18,782 


0.93 




1957 


50,124,976 


5,366,245,253 


22,607* 


19,781 


0.93 




1958 


52,741,979 


5,651,743,390 


23,077* 


20,409 


0.93 




1959 


61,167,603 


7,052,152,034 


23,545* 


24,960 


0.87 




1960 


64,057,506 


7,326,683,025 


23,613* 


25,857 


0.87 




1961 


69,215,271 


7,994,001,074 


23,179* 


28,740 


0.87 



* Irregular variations from year to year in numbers of customers result from reclassifications from 
commercial to residential and from industrial power to commercial service billing. 

Note: Kwh consumption figures for residential and commercial service in the above table 
reflect the use of flat-rate water-heaters for a uniform average of 16.8 hours per day. 

for revenue and 12.6 per cent for energy consumption with a consequent decline 
in average cost per kilowatt-hour. It is interesting to note that for commercial and 
industrial power service the cost per kilowatt-hour is approximately what it was 
in 1952. For residential and commercial service the average cost per kilowatt-hour 
is actually lower than it was in 1940, notwithstanding the inflationary rise in the 
general cost of living. 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 

Total revenues of the 354 municipal electrical utilities in 1961 were 
$205,165,523 as shown in the table on page 183 where comparative revenues for 
the preceding nine years are also given. This total is 8.4 per cent greater than total 
revenues in 1960, and includes $201,891,409 from the sale of energy, $81,749,793 



Consumption and Average Cost per Kilowatt-hour 



177 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES AND LOCAL SYSTEMS 

ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND AVERAGE COST PER KILOWATT-HOUR 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



CENTS PER K\ 

2.0 — 



INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 

BILLION KWH CENTS PER KWH 



AVERAGE COSV 



ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 



AVERAGE 




ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 



1950 



1955 



1960 



COMMERCIAL SERVICE 



CENTS PER KWH 
20 



AVERAGE COST/ 



ILLION KWH 
8 40 



6 30 



TOTAL ANNUAL ENERGY 
CONSUMPTION 



ANNUAL CONSUMPTION „ 



1950 



1955 



T 

I960 



ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 

(Includes street lighting) 



1950 



T 

1955 



178 



Municipal Electrical Service 



(40.5 per cent) from residential service, $44,662,823 (22.1 per cent) from commer- 
cial service, $68,958,456 (34.2 per cent) from industrial power service, and 
$6,520,337 (3.2 per cent) from street-lighting service in municipalities. 

The revenues derived from street lighting are based on estimated consumption 
only (see table on page 106), and the revenue applicable to the municipal utilities 
is given in the analysis of revenue and expense that follows. In each of the oper- 
ating statements of the utilities the revenue from street lighting is included in the 
amount shown for sales of electric energy. It can be derived for any utility by sub- 
tracting from the revenue shown in Statement "B" the sum of the revenues for the 
same utility shown in Statement "D". 

Total expenses of $187,968,189 were higher than those in 1960 by 7.2 per 
cent. The somewhat larger increases in revenues resulted in a net income of 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 



200 



175 



125 



REVENUE 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 




200 



1960 



Municipal Electrical Utilities — Financial Position 



179 



$17,197,334, which was 8.4 per cent of total revenues as compared with 7.3 per 
cent m 1960. 

Summary of Financial Position 

Total assets of the municipal electrical utilities, after deducting accumulated 
depreciation, were $698,947,256, of which $282,255,861 had been contributed 
through the cost of power towards the retirement of the Commission's long-term 
debt. 

The amount so contributed therefore represents the equity of the utilities in 
the Commission's power systems. The amount differs from the sum of the sinking 
fund reserves shown on the Commission's balance sheet as contributed by the 
municipal utilities only because most of the utilities close their books for the year 
before the Commission's annual calculation of sinking fund is available. The utility 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 

FIXED ASSETS AND LONG-TERM DEBT 

MILLION 
DOLLARS 

cnn 












FIXED ASSETS AT C 


OST 
-------- • 200 


PI 


LONG-TERM 
DEBT 


,^^ 




1 1 1 

1940 1945 1950 


1 1 ° 

1955 1960 



180 Municipal Electrical Service 

balance sheet figures for the equity account are therefore for the most part one 
year in arrears. 

The investment of the municipal electrical utilities in fixed assets at cost 
amounted to $457,392,623 against which accumulated depreciation of $100,165,249 
had been provided. Net long-term debt, that is debentures outstanding less local 
sinking fund, increased by $6,437,840 to $78,550,566. At this level net long-term 
debt represented 17.2 per cent of the cost of fixed assets as compared with 17.4 
percent in 1960. 

Municipal Retail Rates 

Under The Power Commission Act the Commission exercises supervisory 
control over the activities of the municipal electrical utilities, and their rates to 
ultimate customers are subject to the Commission's approval. The rates set will 
usually provide for some margin of net income in addition to providing for the 
operating expenses of the utility. 

A margin of net income provides both an economical source of funds for 
normal system expansion and a stabilizing factor in retail rate adjustment, and the 
Commission takes this into consideration when reviewing municipal retail rates. 

FINANCIAL AND OTHER STATISTICAL TABLES 

Four statistical tables complete this municipal service supplement. The first 
two, designated "Statements A and B" and summarized on page 183, deal with 
accounting operations of the 354 municipal electrical utilities. These statements 
are the balance sheets and operating statements of the utilities alphabetically 
arranged for the Southern Ontario System and the Northern Ontario Properties. 
The other two statements, designated "Statement C" and "Statement D", give rates 
and statistics for each of the 354 utilities and 28 Commission-owned local systems. 
Both statements are alphabetically arranged. The rate schedules in Statement "C" 
are supplemented by typical monthly bills for selected levels of consumption to 
facilitate comparison of the cost of service in different municipalities. Statement 
"D" gives information supplementary to that given in Statement "B" regarding 
customers, revenue, and consumption, both total and average per customer, as well 
as average unit costs for the three main classes of service. The population figures 
given are for the most part those recorded in the Municipal Directory for 1962 
published by the Department of Municipal Affairs of Ontario. 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 



Statistical Tables 



STATEMENTS A and B— 

Financial Statements of the Municipal Electrical Utilities 

Consolidated for Years 1952 to 1961 Page 182 

By Municipalities Page 184 

STATEMENT C— 

Rates and Typical Bills for Electrical Service Provided by the 

354 Municipal Electrical Utilities and 28 Local Systems Page 234 

STATEMENT D— 

Customers, Revenue, and Consumption in Municipalities Served by 

the 354 Municipal Electrical Utilities and 28 Local Systems Page 256 



181 



182 



Municipal Electrical Service 

MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 



Year 


1952 

327 


1953 
332 


1954 
338 


1955 


Number of municipalities included. . . . 


343 


A BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
193,795,886 
50,985,329 


$ 
214,595,382 

5i,282,571 


$ 

243,525,700 

58.973.786 


$ 
267,090,752 




62,U13,111 






Net fixed assets 


142,810,557 

4,667,729 
11,542,720 
7,386,628 


160.312.811 

4,884.136 
10.716,659 
10,298,699 


184,551,914 

7,376,869 
16,361,137 
10,695,799 


204,677,641 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable 


9,277,807 

17,392,469 

9,939,403 






Total current assets 

OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores . 


23.597,077 

8,001.403 

388.410 

1.889.669 


25,899,494 

7,527,844 

410,806 

2,393,860 


34,433,805 

7,413,229 

383,454 

3,465.797 


36,609,679 
7 900,466 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Miscellaneous .... . . 


383,751 
2,323,308 






Total other assets . . 


10,279,482 
128,655.935 


10,332,510 
140,068,857 


11,262,480 
152,461.822 


10,607,525 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


167,250,921 




305,343,051 


336,613,672 


382,710.021 


419.145,766 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding. . .... 


24,159.239 

10.375.202 

1,762,833 


29.827,723 
10,943,035 
2.224,181 


45,645,051 
11,090,473 
2,843,742 


49,776,907 


Accounts payable . ... 


10,574,522 


Other 


3,493,146 






Total liabilities 


36,297,274 

128.655,935 
8,008,752 


42.994,939 

140,068,857 
8,153,001 


59,579,266 

152.461,822 
8,095,705 


63,844,575 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


167,250,921 

7,765,477 






Total reserves 


136,664,687 

60,260,350 
388.410 

72.374.288 

6 J^ 1,9 5 8 


148,221.858 

61.417.714 
410.806 

83.934.775 

366,J^20 


160.557.527 

64.210.220 
383,454 

98,687,493 

707,939 


175,016,398 


CAPITAL 




Debentures redeemed 


66,488,672 


Local sinking fund 


383,751 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 

Frequency standardization expense 
charged this year . ... 


114,727,112 
l,3H,7i.2 






Total capital 


132,381,090 


145,396.875 


162,573,228 


180,284,793 








.305.343 051 


336.613 672 


.382,710 021 


419 145,766 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


88,744,441 
1,314,598 


107.997.010 
1,257.311 


119,510.834 
1,345,281 


129,810,298 
1,457,199 






Total revenue 


90,059.039 


109.254,321 


120,856,115 


131,267,497 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


55,583,501 
322.179 
9,918.6.38 
7.645.806 
1.981.386 
5.293,509 
71,211 


69,750.630 

319.744 

10.674.897 

8.236.239 

2.400.468 

5.832,594 

147,083 


75,539,512 
426.606 
11.527.269 
9,299,705 
3.242,705 
6,547,361 
141,824 


79,779,898 


Local generation 

Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Fixed charges — interest and principal 

— depreciation 

—other 


459,594 

12,076,620 

9,896,805 

4.216.877 

7,193,495 

144,121 


Total expense 


80,816.230 


97,361,655 


106,774,982 


113,767.410 


Net income or net expense 


9,242,809 


11,892,666 


14.081,133 


17,500,087 


Number of customers 


941.975 


936,144 


1,045.742 


1,089,835 



Statements A and B 

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1952-1961 



183 



1956 
350 


1957 
351 


1958 
354 


1959 
354 


1960 
354 


1961 
354 


$ 

298,832,207 

66,5S9,U20 


$ 
327,925,974 
68,975,083 


$ 
349,706.161 
72,673,866 


$ 
385,419.306 
77,551,575 


$ 
413,611,989 
82,21^6,973 


$ 
457.392.623 
100.1 65,2 Jt9 


232,292,787 

9,858,536 
15,512,896 
12,776,466 


258,950.891 

10,819.896 
14.174.408 
12,573,922 


277.032.295 

10.769.037 
13.333.906 
13,911,267 


307,867.731 

10.400,010 
15,560,183 
13,463,791 


331,365.016 

12,250.801 
13,990,120 
12.868.807 


357,227.374 

15.105.454 
14,672,152 
14,190,953 


38,147,898 

9,681,858 

290,682 

2,399,184 


37,568,226 

9,579,584 

561,622 

1,894,582 


38,014,210 

17.237,653 
1,033,436 
2,214.392 


39,423,984 

9.381.215 
1.726,182 
2.421,279 


39,109,728 

9.197.511 
2.316.958 
2.553.588 


43.968,559 

9,590,459 
3,261.509 
2.643.494 


12,371,724 
183,262,708 


12,035,788 
200,293,236 


20.485.481 
218.736,441 


13,528,676 
238,790,589 


14.068.057 
261,101.650 


15.495.462 
282.255.861 


466,075,117 


508,848,141 


554,268,427 


599,610,980 


645,644,451 


698,947,256 


58,528,557 

11,633,156 

3,910,276 


63.315,360 
11.226.905 
4,207.237 


69,363,792 

10,105,465 

6,175.200 


70,456,844 

10,589,995 

6,565,031 


74.429.684 
10.485.382 
7,146,524 


81.812.075 
12,594,844 
7,860.946 


74,071,989 

183,262,708 
6,948,236 


78,749,502 

200,293,236 
5,658,849 


85,644,457 

218,736,441 
3,507,375 


87,611,870 

238,790,589 
2,864.918 


92,061,590 

261,101,650 
2.920,005 


102.267,865 

282,255.861 
2.468.637 


190,210,944 

69,338,990 
290,682 

132,983,134 

820,622 


205,952,085 

72,087,556 
561,622 

152,057,614 

560,238 


222.243,816 

75,021,200 
1.033,436 

170.871.551 

5U6,033 


241,655,507 

77.881,620 
1.726.182 

190.444.985 

290,816 


264,021,655 

81,266,027 
2,316,958 

205,984,657 

6,1^36 


284,724.498 

84.572.157 
3.261.509 

224.121.227 






201,792,184 


224.146,554 


246.380,154 


270,343,603 


289,561,206 


311,954.893 


466,075,117 


508,848,141 


554,268,427 


599.610,980 


645.644,451 


698,947,256 



142,629,092 
1.554,347 


151,855,664 
1,580,224 


160,700,759 
1,723,986 


175,686,813 
2,400,070 


186,599,701 
2,720,870 


201,891,409 
3,274,114 


144,183,439 


153,435,888 


162,424,745 


178.086,883 


189,320,571 


205,165,523 


87,344,024 

501,386 

13,406,955 

11,015,893 

4,744,936 

7,709,546 

59,374 


92,682,089 

575,771 

14,362,587 

12,086,583 

5,504,842 

8,389,004 

53.525 


98,563,451 

509,240 

15,544,060 

13,654,386 

6,175,773 

9,216,594 

13.060 


111,160,867 

531,076 

17,065,080 

14,954,828 

6,824.770 

10,030.350 

14.316 


122,634,361 

536,118 

18,273,164 

15,766,246 

7,440,556 

10,750,710 

22,506 


130,857,200 

529,955 

19,486,528 

17,342,308 

8,203,772 

11,466,692 

81,734 


124,782,114 


133,654,401 


143,676.564 


160,581,287 


175.423,661 


187,968.189 


19,401,325 


19,781,487 


18,748,181 


17,505,596 


13,896,910 


17,197,334 


1,153,371 


1,192.357 


1,255,805 


1,310,099 


1,351,915 


1,423,427 



184 



Southern Ontario System 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Municipality . . 


Acton 
4,205 


Ailsa Craig 
549 


Ajax 
7,849 


Alexandria 
2,486 


Alfred 
965 


A.lIistoii 


Population 


2.948 


A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
400,483 
59,226 


$ 
40,332 

2,1,37 


$ 
966,792 
195,999 


$ 
272,715 
73,157 


$ 
79,896 

19,765 


$ 
233.700 


Accumulated depreciation 


71, U7 


Net fixed assets 


341,257 

11,239 
15.000 
5,700 


37,895 
11,795 


770,793 
122,508 


199,558 

8,624 
13,000 
2,852 


60,131 
7,657 


162 253 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investment in government securities 


3,206 
18,000 


151 


24,302 


6,975 


6,188 






Total current assets 


31,939 
1,497 
2,165 


11,946 


146.810 
24,792 


24,476 
9,243 


14,632 


27,394 


OTHER ASSETS 


5,345 


Sinking fund on local debentures . , . 
Miscellaneous 










6,382 


222 


519 


151 








Total other assets 


3,662 
395,674 




31.174 
101,287 


9,465 
147,754 


519 
8,182 


5,496 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


56,338 


143,564 




772.532 


106.179 


1,050,064 


381,253 


83.464 


338,707 


LIABILITIES 


57,300 

622 

9.002 




391,000 

2,753 

60.623 


1,973 

5,862 

12,372 


29,500 
2,256 
1,921 








1,403 


Other 


1,911 


4,814 


Total liabilities 

RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


66,924 
395,674 


1,911 
56,338 


454,376 
101,287 


20,207 
147,754 


33,677 
8,182 


6,217 
143,564 


















395,674 
26,639 

283,295 


56,338 
6,883 


101.287 
57,238 


147,754 
51,326 


8,182 
8,500 

33,105 


143,564 


CAPITAL 


29,990 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


41,047 


437,163 


161,966 


158,936 


Total capital 


309,934 


47,930 


494,401 


213.292 


41,605 


188,926 








772,532 


106,179 


1.050,064 


381.253 


83,464 


338.707 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other . . . 


228,883 
412 


19,046 
92 


363,708 
8,454 


98,311 
5,539 


31,589 
232 


119,280 
3,221 






Total revenue . 


229,295 


19.138 


372,162 


103.850 


31,821 


122,501 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


164,612 

19,564 

12,466 

5,449 

8,899 


12,359 


211,492 


80,438 


17,857 


85,547 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


1..573 
884 


21,757 
45,473 
35,714 
22,891 


6,410 
9,891 
2,072 
6,755 


2,049 
3,103 
2,991 
2,200 


13,954 
10,745 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 

— depreciation 

— other 




1,003 


5,306 
















Total expense 


210,990 


15,819 


337,327 


105,566 


28.200 


115,552 






Net income or net expense 


18,305 


3.319 


.34,835 


1,716 


3.621 


6,949 


Number of customers 


1.312 


224 


2,188 


895 


305 


1,096 



Statements A ami B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



185 



Almonte 
3.316 


Alvinston 
626 


Amherst- 
burg 
4,414 


Ancaster 
Twp. 
13,397 


Apple Hill 
400 


Arkona 
497 


Arnprior 
5,505 


Arthur 
1,256 


Athens 
960 


$ 
423,708 
86,362 


$ 

60,569 
19,095 


$ 
429,005 
89,U60 


$ 
267,581 
U7,378 


$ 

23,078 
6,185 


$ 

45,694 
10,763 


$ 
470,926 
65,1 98 


$ 
111,385 
27,687 


$ 

63,943 
12,8U7 


337,346 
1,187 


41,474 

5,301 

3,500 

763 


339,545 

8,651 
17,858 
3,291 


220,203 
25 


16,893 

4,046 

3,000 

379 


34,931 

2,794 
4,000 
1,580 


405,728 
35,919 


83,698 


51,096 
912 


52.000 


10,000 
1,244 


14,000 


3,524 


91 


1,745 


2,100 


56,711 
9,004 


9,564 


29,800 
8,882 


116 
677 


7,425 


8,374 


37,664 
3,632 


11,244 


17,012 
















100 


314 


621 


600 






300 












9,004 


100 
55,101 


9,196 
311.193 


1,298 
129,738 


600 
13,436 




3,632 
220,255 


300 
83,721 




58,589 


32,218 


35,124 


461.650 


106.239 


689,734 


351,355 


38.354 


75,523 


667.279 


178,963 


103 232 






13,600 
4,143 
4,181 


70,658 

192 

2,018 






39,375 

27,201 

7,862 






20,829 
1,539 


346 
109 


330 
37 


39 
40 


2,526 
778 


93 
213 


22,368 

58,589 
1,800 


455 
55,101 


21,924 
311,193 


72.868 
129,738 


367 
13.436 


79 
32,218 


74,438 

220,255 
1,143 


3,304 
83,721 


306 
35,124 


















60,389 

72,000 


55,101 
23,529 


311,193 
54,859 


129,738 
57,589 


13,436 
5,080 


32,218 
13,113 


221,398 
86,093 


83,721 
23,913 


35,124 
12,988 


306,893 


27,154 


301,758 


91,160 


19,471 


30.113 


285,350 


68,025 


54,814 


378,893 


50,683 


356,617 


148,749 


24,551 


43,226 


371,443 


91,938 


67,802 


461,650 


106,239 


689,734 


351.355 


38.354 1 


75,523 


667,279 


178.963 


103.232 



110,302 
7,159 


17,703 
165 


204,474 
2,747 


134.995 
551 


6,207 
163 


20,383 
156 


209,674 
3,338 


42,070 
447 


19,744 
640 


117,461 


17,868 


207,221 


135.546 


6,370 


20,539 


213,012 


42,517 


20,384 


62,301 
11,625 


10,911 


133,953 


99,537 


3,532 


15,138 


158,091 


29,387 


16,304 


9,136 
12,755 


1,244 
2,719 


14,006 

17,017 

4,583 

10,352 


9.869 

14,512 

9,008 

7,028 


1,039 
1,146 


1,446 
1,315 


12,408 

20,476 

6,642 

12,262 


5,359 
2,759 


1,682 
1,500 


10,131 


1,971 


670 


1,229 


3,144 


1,798 




















105,948 


16,845 


179,911 


139,954 


6,387 


19,128 


209,879 


40,649 


21.284 


11,513 


1.023 


27,310 


4,408 


17 


1,411 


3.133 


1.868 


900 


1.096 


330 


1,440 


1,108 


114 


188 


1,779 


505 


367 



186 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Municipality 


Aurora 
8,055 


Avonmore 
248 


Aylmer 
4.650 


Ayr 
1,024 


Baden 
888 


Bancroft 


Population . 


2,535 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


$ 
613,364 
1H.750 


$ 

24,213 
5,995 


$ 
354.897 
105,582 


$ 
81,272 

1^,085 


$ 

71,548 
15,061 


$ 
314,144 


Accumulated depreciation 


73,703 








498,614 

119,494 

4,565 


18,218 

931 

96 


249,315 
26.778 


67,187 

2,359 

10,500 

1,149 


56,487 

7,988 

6,000 

148 


240,441 


CURRENT ASSETS 


28.978 








3,902 


8,469 






Total current assets 

OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 


124,059 
1,726 
5,557 


1.027 


30.680 
1.234 


14,008 
75 


14,136 
85 


37,447 
9 284 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 








459 


517 






4,603 










Total other assets 


7,283 
190,174 


459 
4,543 


1,751 
289,821 


75 
73,114 


85 
120,689 


13.887 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


36,149 




820.130 


24,247 


571,567 


154,384 


191,397 


327,924 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


222,000 

2.023 

17,084 


13,000 

7 

2,805 


38.000 

519 

3.691 






69,125 


Accounts payable 


1,536 
493 




5,146 


Other 


100 


2.943 






Total liabilities 


241,107 
190,174 


15,812 
4,543 


42.210 
289,821 


2,029 
73,114 


100 
120,689 


77,214 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


36,149 
















Total reserves 


190,174 
2,775 


4,543 
1,000 


289,821 
50,702 


73,114 
17.503 


120,689 
5,000 


36 149 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed . . 


63 375 


Local sinking fund. 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


386,074 


2,892 


188,834 


61,738 


65,608 


151,186 


Total capital 


388,849 


3,892 


239,536 


79,241 


70,608 


214.561 






820.130 


24,247 


571,567 


154,384 


191.397 


327,924 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


349,284 
13,467 


11,144 
80 


196,376 
1.391 


42.630 
319 


41,610 
223 


98.873 


Other 


105 






Total revenue 


362,751 


11,224 


197,767 


42,949 


41,833 


98 978 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


224,595 


6,591 


158,958 


29,728 


32,317 


50,623 
4,469 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


25,800 
25.251 
14.286 
13,679 


501 

726 

1,406 

691 


11.891 

10.329 

4,908 

9,716 


3,690 
2,371 


1,739 
2,642 


7,643 
7,319 
9,393 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 


— depreciation 

— other 


2,264 


1,842 


7,819 
















Total expense 


303,611 


9,915 


195,802 


38,053 


38,540 


87 266 






Net income or net expense 


59,140 


1.309 


1,965 


4,896 


3,293 


11,712 


Number of customers 


2.724 


116 


1,536 


379 


279 


775 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



187 



I 



Barrie 
21,610 


Barry's Bay 
1.432 


Bath 
699 


Beachburg 
536 


Beachville 
836 


Beamsville 
2,481 


Beaverton 
1,211 


Beeton 
830 


Belle River 
1,894 


$ 
1,914,892 
5 95, 85 ^ 


$ 
86.994 

8,I^17 


$ 
67,100 

H,727 


$ 

55.938 
n,599 


$ 
107,345 
30,A77 


$ 
152,173 
33,333 


$ 
124.858 
2M99 


$ 

69,895 
9,681 


$ 
119,487 
20,581 


1.319,038 

7,640 
14,063 


78.577 
10.904 


52.373 
5,570 


41,339 
6,404 


76,868 

18,440 

35.000 

682 


118.840 

10,032 

4.000 

250 


100,359 
8,322 


60,214 

9.283 
1,500 
1,976 


98.906 

511 
7 000 


24,105 


4,123 


925 


2.658 


78 


411 


45,808 
31,771 


15.027 


6,495 


9,062 


54.122 


14,282 


8,400 
528 


12,759 


7,922 
424 


















2,588 




300 


7,574 






80 




945 














34,359 




300 
18,230 


7,574 






608 
95,896 




1,369 


999,548 


12.898 


202.390 


88.336 


60,639 


64,344 








2,398.753 


106,502 


77,398 


57,975 


333,380 


221,458 


205,263 


133,612 


172,541 






7,500 
792 
754 


50,600 

2,117 

50 










2,800 


4 


646 
485 


678 
491 


2,188 
1,714 




7 
1,284 


3,227 


24.490 


667 


1,528 


24.494 
999.548 


1.131 
12.898 


9.046 
18,230 


52.767 


1,169 
202,390 


3,902 
88,336 


667 
95,896 


1,291 
60,639 


7,555 

64,344 


























999,548 


12.898 
7.500 


18,230 
10.000 




202,390 
5,537 


88,336 
37,500 


95,896 
12,839 


60,639 
13,610 


64,344 


65,366 


1.400 


17,700 


1,309,345 


84,973 


40,122 


3,808 


124,284 


91,720 


95,861 


58,072 


82.942 


1,374.711 


92,473 


50.122 


5,208 


129,821 


129,220 


108,700 


71,682 


100,642 


2.398,753 


106.502 


77,398 


57,975 


333,380 


221,458 


205,263 


133,612 


172,541 



915,704 
14,473 


22,191 
363 


21.088 


24,529 
264 


107,333 
1,781 


84,540 
1,303 


63,678 
2,023 


27,262 
122 


53,272 
692 








930,177 


22,554 


21,088 


24,793 


109.114 


85,843 


65,701 


27,384 


53,964 


616,296 


14,507 


12.988 


12,425 


91,363 


56,758 


45,289 


19,152 

1,584 
1,730 


30,114 


105,710 
63,049 


1,727 
3.223 


906 
2.207 

940 
1.962 


829 
1,583 
4,520 
1,628 


2,470 
1,767 


7,834 
8,129 


6.568 
5,518 


7,604 
6,695 
1,522 


48,220 


2.174 


3,169 


4,056 


3,441 


1.885 


3,058 




















833,275 


21,631 


19,003 


20,985 


98,769 


76.777 


60,816 


24,351 


48,993 


96.902 


923 


2,085 


3,898 


10,345 


9,066 


4,885 


3.033 


4,971 


7,2r4 


412 


251 


2-5 


237 


889 


569 


316 


694 



188 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



IVTiinirinalitv 


Belleville 
29,162 


Blenheim 
3,134 


Bloomfield 
661 


Blyth 
737 


Bobcaygeon 
1.273 


Bolton 


Population 


2,074 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
2,323,931 
522.766 


$ 
309,091 
56,7 U 


$ 

60,387 
20,1 23 


$ 

68,578 
13,183 


$ 
223,325 

5A,88U 


$ 
177,077 




29,755 








1,801,165 

700 

147.286 


252,347 
17,347 


40.264 

3.599 

6.992 

320 


55,395 

8,807 

9,728 

200 


168,441 
8,911 


147,322 


CURRENT ASSETS 


2,162 


Investment in government securities 




2,085 


3,081 


3,253 








147,986 
41,576 


19,432 
1,106 


10,911 
465 


18,735 
58 


11,992 
4,109 


5,415 


OTHER ASSETS 


1,548 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Mi tspplla neons 




169 


700 




4,772 


2,068 










Total Other assets 


41.576 
1.324,265 


1,275 
175,397 


1,165 
37,955 


58 
57,068 


8,881 
29,783 


3,616 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


84,706 




3,314,992 


448,451 


90,295 


131,256 


219,097 


241,059 


LIABILITIES 


400,000 
31,471 
51.490 


43,788 

40 

8,351 






86.800 

864 

7.439 


62,773 


Accounts payable 


380 
581 


314 
257 


4,309 


Other 


7,418 






Total liabilities 


482,961 

1,324,265 
1,240 


52.179 
175.397 


961 
37,955 


571 
57,067 


95,103 
29,783 


74,500 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


84.706 














Total reserves . 


1.325,505 
174.997 


175.397 
54.212 


37,955 
9,797 


57,067 
16,033 


29,783 
17,483 


84,706 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


19,408 


Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


1.331.529 


166.663 


41,582 


57,585 


76.728 


62,445 


Total capital 


1.506,526 


220,875 


51,379 


73,618 


94.211 


81,853 








3,314.992 


448,451 


90,295 


131,256 


219.097 


241.059 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 
Sales of electric energy 


1.068,049 
20,306 


111,466 
2,734 


19,748 
411 


37,775 
255 


59,160 
382 


74.976 


Other 


1,193 








1,088,355 


114,200 


20,159 


38,030 


59,542 


76,169 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


757,327 


60,561 


15,547 


28,055 


30,613 


48,797 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


81,473 
80,862 
16,233 
55,061 


10,272 

14,921 

9,844 

8,245 


1,050 
2,348 


3,295 
2,236 


6,377 
7,669 
8,014 
6,700 


4.209 
8,317 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


5,428 


— depreciation 

— other 


1,795 


1,894 


4,374 
















Total expense 


991,006 


103,843 


20,740 


35.480 


59,373 


71 125 






Net income or net expense 


97,349 


10,357 


581 


2.550 


169 


5,044 


Number of customers 


9,947 


1,179 


313 


332 


746 


657 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



189 



Bothwell 
825 


Bowman- 

ville 
7,242 


Bracebridge 
2,970 


Bradford 
2,358 


Braeside 
530 


Brampton 
19,185 


Brantford 
54,425 


Brantford 
Twp. 
7,824 


Brechin 
272 


$ 

65,103 
20,783 


$ 
710.337 
238,551 


$ 
865,114 
215,U61 


$ 
264,662 
5U,99U 


$ 

31,388 
1,956 


$ 
1,995,314 
220,023 


$ 
5,013,581 
1,230,200 


$ 
1,083,446 
293,J^27 


$ 

20,934 
3.958 


44,320 

3,348 
5,050 


471.786 

24.637 

119.257 

4,412 


649,653 
21,080 


209.668 

17.558 
8.000 
3.353 


29.432 
21,134 


1,775,291 

41,327 

1,500 

30,347 


3,783,381 

36,273 
32,000 
79.174 


790,019 

21,335 

25,000 

8,337 


16,976 

1,932 

7,000 

828 


1,098 


2,790 


5.744 


9,496 
131 


148,306 
12,664 


23,870 
18,131 


28.911 
9.711 


26.878 


73,174 
38,249 


147.447 
101,481 


54.672 
21.132 


9,760 








95 


662 


10,188 


697 




6,722 


2,161 


189 


192 








226 


13,326 
483,426 


28,319 
2,030 


10,408 
113,984 




44,971 
854,676 


103,642 
4,733,737 


21.321 
232.970 


192 


64.913 


26.029 


23,609 


118,955 


1.116,844 


703,872 


362.971 


82,339 


2.748,112 


8.768,207 


1,098,982 


50,537 






231,891 

1,814 

835 




1.225 


772.000 

7,100 

46,497 


499,689 

7.089 

73,793 


464,730 

1,367 

20.154 




385 


815 
2,994 


356 
2,458 


95 


103 


217 


180 


488 
64,913 


3,809 
433.426 


234,540 
2,030 


2,814 
113,984 


1,442 
26,029 


825.597 

854,676 
867 


580,571 
4,733,737 


486,251 
232,970 


275 
23.609 


















64.913 
5.534 


483,426 
71.000 


2,030 
273,909 


113,984 
23,351 


26.029 
4.775 


855,543 
158,937 


4,733,737 
944,994 


232,970 
96,486 


23.609 
2.664 


48.020 


558.609 


193,393 


222,822 


50,093 


908,035 


2,508,905 


283,275 


23.989 


53,554 


629,609 


467,302 


246.173 


54,868 


1,066,972 


3.453,899 


379,761 


26,653 


118,955 


1.116.844 


703,872 


362,971 


82,339 


2,748,112 


8,768,207 


1,098,982 


50,537 



25,619 
806 


275.758 
11,888 


129,961 
2,474 


107,843 
1,389 


62,738 

40 


890,529 
13,373 


2,248,113 
5,150 


411,007 
3,112 


7,177 
232 


26,425 


287,646 


132,435 


109,232 


62,778 


903,902 


2.253,263 


414,119 


7,409 


14,070 


209,465 


3,994 
33,953 
21,307 
13,012 
29,127 
19,368 


70,328 


53.180 


530.283 


1,616,476 


238,479 


3,846 


3.181 
4,069 


29,625 
19,050 


12,968 
11,430 


1,358 

1,252 

442 

788 


49,385 
57,001 
62,637 
39,631 


155,220 

101,658 

64,157 

131,042 


49,962 
29,477 
43,107 
30,830 


583 
687 


1,853 


19.004 


6,025 


580 








. 












23,173 


277,144 


120,761 


100,751 


57,020 


738,937 


2,068.553 


391.855 


5,696 


3,252 


10,502 


11,674 


8.481 


5 758 


164,965 


184.710 


22,264 


1.713 


330 


2,471 


1,155 


833 


162 


6,135 


17,184 


2.298 


100 



190 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



A/Tiinirinalitv . 


Bridgeport 
1,695 


Brigden 
513 


Brighton 

2.427 


Brockville 
17,690 


Brussels 
853 


Burford 


Population . 


1,080 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
89,803 


$ 

47,615 
12,1 9 A 


$ 
235.965 

30,3i7 


$ 
1,975,988 

U6.73i 


$ 

80,814 
6,361 


$ 
92.968 




2U,092 






68.157 

4.854 
5,000 
1,238 


35.421 

5,378 
3,042 
1,152 


205.618 
3,039 


1,529,254 


74,453 
8,832 


68.876 


CURRENT ASSETS 


3.820 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 


12,000 
35.998 


3.500 
1,042 


2,128 


1.670 






11.092 
22 
69 


9,572 
28 


5,167 
7,760 


47.998 
33.300 


10.502 
183 


8.362 


OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 


148 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 






1.980 


3,374 
















91 
52.266 


28 
43,937 


9.740 
97.030 


36.674 
1.138.976 


183 
67,844 


148 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


72,853 




131,606 


88,958 


317,555 


2,752,902 


152,982 


150,239 


LIABILITIES 


15.905 
1,881 




37,900 

952 

3,375 


358,500 

172,739 

25.693 


7,000 
7.367 
1,205 


10,331 


Accounts payable 

Other 


249 
206 


1 
1,246 






Total liabilities 


17.786 
52.266 


455 
43.937 


42.227 
97.030 


556.932 
1,138,976 


15,572 
67,844 


11,578 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


72,853 


















52,266 
15.623 


43,937 
8,000 


97,030 
27.100 


1,138,976 
198,770 


67.844 
21.000 


72,853 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


10,523 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


45,931 


36,566 


151,198 


858.224 


48.566 


55,285 


Total capital 


61.554 


44,566 


178.298 


1,056.994 


69.566 


65.808 








131,606 


88.958 


317.555 


2,752.902 


152,982 


150,239 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


48.444 
278 


16,011 
112 


78,900 
1,056 


755.351 
19.688 


38.729 
245 


47.117 


Other 


384 






Total revenue 


48,722 


16,123 


79,956 


775,039 


38,974 


47,501 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


33.563 


9,325 


52.585 


507.163 


28,030 


31,171 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


2.547 
5.972 
1,490 
2.703 


1.669 
1,725 


8.209 
8.804 
3,440 
5,366 


68,317 
69,118 
39,979 
44,831 


2,779 

2,512 

808 

2,006 


3,596 
3,206 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 


1,215 


— depreciation 

— other 


1.407 


2,450 
















Total expense 


46,275 


14,126 


78,404 


729,408 


36,135 


41,638 






Net income or net expense 


2,447 


1,997 


1,552 


45,631 


2,839 


5,863 


Nu.Tiber of customers 


461 


212 


1.001 


6,036 


377 


411 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



191 



Burgessville 
260 


Burk's Falls 
914 


Burlington 
46,374 


Caledonia 
2,265 


Campbell- 
ford 
3,428 


Campbell- 
ville 
216 


Cannington 
1,024 


Cardinal 
1,991 


Carleton 
Place 
4.699 


$ 

24.501 
7.3A8 


$ 

84.991 
15,117 


$ 
4.029.364 
686,0U 


$ 
172,351 
35,705 


$ 
690.731 
U7,006 


$ 

19,827 
5,269 


$ 

73,704 
19.361 


$ 

84,454 
13,903 


$ 
292,368 
69,39k 


17.153 
2.609 


69.874 

1,636 
4,900 
1,461 


3,343,320 

112,002 
37,500 
70,725 


136,646 
2,613 


543.725 
7.309 


14,558 

4,435 
2,406 
1,363 


54,343 

12,140 

14,000 

830 


70,551 

2,682 

1,500 

326 


222,974 


1,500 


15,000 
8,062 


345 


2,693 


7,165 


4.454 


7,997 
285 


220,227 
37,566 


5,306 
446 


14,474 
10,735 


8,204 


26,970 
20 


4,508 


23,062 
7,105 










147 


790 


88.485 


126 


4,346 


10 






100 










147 


1,075 
18,614 


126,051 
724,793 


572 
107,023 


15.081 
3.760 


10 
15,311 


20 
69,554 




7,205 


23,518 


64,190 


389,624 


45.272 


97,560 


4,414,391 


249,547 


577,040 


38,083 


150,887 


139,249 


642,865 




8,514 

578 

98 


1,888,013 

5.728 

146.678 


2,000 

38 

2,495 


101.000 

34.125 

7,268 








13,100 


55 


3,370 


445 
390 


47 
135 


7,383 
3,529 








55 
23,518 


9,190 
18,614 


2,040,419 
724,793 


4,533 
107,023 


142,393 
3,760 


3,370 
15,311 


835 
69,554 


182 
64,190 


24,012 
389,624 




















23.518 
3,500 


18,614 
26,486 


724,793 
357,378 


107.023 
13.525 


3,760 
4,000 


15,311 
5,448 


69,554 
14,532 


64,190 
11,014 

63,863 


389,624 
60,197 


18,199 


43,270 


1,291,801 


124,466 


426,887 


13,954 


65,966 


169,032 


21,699 


69,756 


1,649,179 


137,991 


430.887 


19,402 


80,498 


74,877 


229,229 


45,272 


97,560 


4,414,391 


249.547 


577,040 


38,083 


150,887 


139,249 


642,865 


11,569 
- 123 


39,699 
598 


2,133,385 
21,536 


67,150 
173 


121,219 
1,554 


9,163 
191 


38,317 
436 


46,364 
204 


184,476 
989 


^k 


40,297 


2,154,921 


67,323 


122,773 


9,354 


38,753 


46,568 


185,465 


^m 


25,994 


1,226.252 


38,909 


30,278 
24,409 
16,618 
27,128 
8.448 
12,621 


6,479 


22,605 


35.128 


129,016 


^B 594 
^B 586 


3,094 
3,256 
3,039 
2,175 


126.528 

129,379 

184,453 

94,564 


6,823 

7,769 

614 

4,424 


939 
586 


2.138 
3.060 


3,950 

3,448 


16.110 

25,377 

1.554 


^B 735 


555 


2,231 


2.272 


7,614 




















9.665 


37,558 


1,761,176 


58,539 


119,502 


8.559 


30,034 


44,798 


179,671 


2,027 


2,739 


393,745 


8,784 


3,271 


795 


8,719 


1,770 


5,794 


100 


350 


13,972 


820 


1,357 


93 


450 


666 


1.737 



192 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



lV4iinirinalitv . . 


Casselman 
1,331 


Cayuga 
910 


Chalk 
River 
1,062 


Chatham 
29.332 


Chats- 
worth 
407 


Chesley 


Pnniilation 


1,650 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
93.161 
12.193 


$ 

95,080 
20,637 


$ 

71,845 
15,A53 


$ 
3.129.570 

7i.8,230 


$ 
30,927 

10,238 


$ 
116,555 




39,720 








80,968 

7,580 

14,000 

85 


74,443 

538 

6,000 

324 


56,392 
3,434 


2,381,340 

69,736 
140,000 
166,515 


20.689 

9.542 

6,000 

579 


76.835 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investment in government securities 


15.201 
17.000 


3,625 


471 






Total current assets .... 


21,665 


6,862 
252 


7,059 


376,251 
93,612 


16,121 


32.672 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores 


1,535 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Miscellaneous 


4.838 










2,633 


44,646 




258 










Total other assets 


4.838 
17,829 


252 
48,063 


2,633 
12,598 


138,258 
1,970,103 




1,793 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


26,934 


162,216 




125,300 


129,620 


78,682 


4,865,952 


63,744 


273,516 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


45,500 

557 

35 




46,500 


623,226 
106.168 
37,753 






Accounts payable . 


198 
1,215 


81 
163 


693 


Other 


340 








Total liabilities. . 


46,092 
17,829 


1,413 
48.063 


46,840 
12,598 


767,147 

1,970,103 
74,806 


244 
26,934 


693 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


162,216 














Total reserves 


17,829 
24,500 


48,063 
20,000 


12,593 
8,500 


2,044,909 
896,774 


26,934 
5,014 


162,216 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Local sinking fund 


24,410 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


36,879 


60,144 


10,744 


1,157,122 


31,552 


86,197 


Total capital 


61,379 


80,144 


19,244 


2,053,896 


36,566 


110,607 








125 300 


129 6?f) 


78 682 


4 865.952 


63,744 


273,516 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


43,663 
719 


31.135 
364 


25,188 
92 


1,527,603 
17,185 


14,974 
367 


63 660 


Other 


993 






Total revenue 


44.382 


31,499 


25,280 


1.544,788 


15,341 


64.653 


EXPENSE 

Power purchased .... 


28.376 


19.267 


17,557 


744,725 


10,786 


45,111 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Fixed charges— interest and principal 


1.972 
3,910 
5,430 
2,390 


4.118 
4,954 


1.566 
1.841 
4.668 
2.012 


295,505 

234,332 

88,741 

72,641 


683 
1,087 


5,687 
6,687 


— depreciation 

— other 


2,705 


933 


3,594 














Total expense 


42,078 


31.044 


27,644 


1,435,944 


13,489 


61,079 




Net income or net expense 


2.304 


455 


2,364 


108,844 


1,852 


3.574 


Number of customers 


384 


374 


291 


9.673 


169 


732 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



193 



Chesterville 
1,252 


Chippawa 
3,182 


Clifford 
559 


Clinton 
3,227 


Cobden 
878 


Cobourg 
9,556 


Col borne 
1,357 


Coldwater 
750 


Collingwood 
8.134 


$ 
89,598 

17.807 


$ 
224,491 
38,559 


$ 

48,064 
10A6S 


$ 
314.024 
62,592 


$ 
72,810 

10,292 


$ 
1,011,714 
2U3,297 


$ 
104,905 
16,366 


$ 

58.524 
13,920 


$ 
610,349 

127,^90 


71,791 

13,411 
6,000 


185,932 
12,207 


37,601 

6,708 

6.034 

227 


251,432 
12,805 


62,518 

2,020 

6,000 

480 


768.417 

64.861 
10,000 
36.502 


88.539 
130 


44.604 

17.564 

12.500 

1,789 


482,859 

11,284 
53,447 
12,150 


4,822 


4,732 


1,132 


8.886 


24,233 


16,939 
1,326 


12.969 
17 


13,937 
6,838 


8,500 


111.363 
15.550 


9.016 
15.538 


31,853 


76,881 
19 034 












987 




257 


330 


410 


71 


189 


1.035 






121,471 


2,313 
89,103 


17 
38.830 


7,095 
226.988 


330 
31,010 


15.960 
530.495 


15.609 
52.930 


189 

56,980 


20,069 
619,224 


217,495 


294,287 


89,417 


499,452 


102,358 


1,426,235 


166,094 


133,626 


1,199,033 




60.800 
2,712 
2,796 


5.550 
109 
336 


51.000 

651 

10.022 












1,000 




4,008 
13.034 


11.434 
1.784 


38 

275 


259 


141 


348 


7,459 


1,141 

121,471 


66,308 
89,103 


5,995 
38,830 


61,673 
226,988 


348 
31,010 


17,042 
.530,495 


13.218 
52.930 


313 
56,930 


7.718 
619,224 




















121,471 
5,889 


89,103 

17,550 


38.830 
9,379 


226,988 
70.673 


31,010 
4,949 


530,495 
105,994 


52.930 
12.195 


56,980 
6,867 


619,224 
38.183 


88,994 


121,326 


35.213 


140.118 


66,051 


772,704 


87.751 


69,466 


533.908 


94,883 


138,876 


44.592 


210,791 


71,000 


878.698 


99.946 


76.333 


572,091 


217,495 


294.287 


89.417 


499,452 


102,358 


1,426,235 


166,094 


133,626 


1,199.033 



71,250 

445 


89,580 
346 


21,608 
783 


137,087 
1,680 


28.508 
466 


453.600 
3.506 


55.503 
2.946 


28,311 
566 


307.947 
3.902 


71,695 


89,926 


22,391 


138,767 


28,974 


457,106 


58,449 


28 877 


311,849 


55,037 


53,691 


16,047 


90,681 


22,376 


313,475 


36,351 


19,175 


213.857 


4.037 
5.817 


9,695 
6,219 
6,461 
5,876 


822 
1,457 

567 
1,210 


14,767 

10,564 

6,523 

7,475 


2.862 
2.604 


25,799 
39,968 


3,829 

6,737 

262 

2,211 


2,291 
2,712 


26.005 
25.258 


2.401 


1.882 


26,074 


1.706 


14,658 




















67,292 


81,942 


20,103 


130,010 


29,724 


405.316 


49,390 


25 884 


279,778 


4,403 


7,984 


2,288 


8 757 


750 


51,790 


9,059 


2,993 


32,071 


457 


1,049 


225 


1,246 


395 


3.515 


578 


274 


3,114 



194 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Miinirinalitv . . 


Comber 
583 


Cookstown 
643 


Cottam 
659 


Courtright 
549 


Creemore 
877 


Dashwood 


Populstion , 


416 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASStrS 


$ 
57,659 
U.103 


$ 

53,778 
10,^16 


$ 
54,629 

15,287 


$ 

29,536 
5,902 


$ 

55.685 
6,976 


$ 
27,823 




U,769 






Net fixed assets 


43,556 

6,207 

393 


43,362 

2,721 
5,000 
1,436 


39,342 

5,796 
3,000 


23.634 

772 


48.709 

7,046 
5.000 
1,259 


23,054 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


6,303 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net ) 




203 


50 










6,600 

12 

566 


9,157 


8.796 
95 


975 
16 


13,305 


6,353 


OTHER ASSETS 




Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 




217 




Miscellaneous 




108 





183 










Total other assets 


578 
64,980 




203 
25,083 


16 
23,952 


217 
52,349 


183 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


29,898 


38.345 




115,714 


82.417 


73,424 


48,577 


114,580 


67.935 


LIABILITIES 


1,918 
598 
554 




1,500 

73 

828 










73 
805 


1,638 
420 


280 
611 


883 


Other. 








Total liabilities . . 


3,070 
64.980 


878 
29,898 


2,401 
25,084 


2.058 
23.952 


891 
52,349 


883 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


38,345 
















Total reserves. . 


64,980 
10,782 


29,898 
12,001 


25,084 
12,500 


23,952 
8.138 


52,349 
2,824 


38.345 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


3,400 


Local sinking fund 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


36,882 


39,640 


33,439 


14,429 


58,516 


25.307 


Total capital 


47.664 


51.641 


45,939 


22,567 


61.340 


28.707 








115,714 


82.417 


73.424 


48,577 


114.580 


67.935 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


21.709 
46 


18,819 
454 


17,721 
90 


10,518 
115 


28,760 
373 


17 279 


Other 


5 






Total revenue 


21,755 


19.273 


17,811 


10,633 


29,133 


17,284 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


10,844 


14,277 


10,724 


7,227 


17,355 


11,255 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


2,363 

2,729 

419 

1,679 


1,620 
1,245 


896 
1,904 

579 
1,660 


1,027 

1,016 

144 

832 


1,607 
1.909 


1,149 
1,707 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


— depreciation 

—other 


1,518 


1.452 


774 
















Total expense 


18,034 


18,660 


15,763 


10,246 


22,323 


14.885 






Net income or net expense 


3,721 


613 


2,048 


387 


6,810 


2.399 


Number of customers 


234 


250 


246 


195 


364 


184 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



195 



Deep River 
5,365 


Delaware 
409 


Delhi 
3,447 


Deseronto 
1,785 


Dorchester 
914 


Drayton 
633 


Dresden 
2.245 


Drumbo 
400 


Dublin 
275 


$ 
603,154 
127.J^90 


$ 

29,365 
8,885 


$ 
330,532 
80,129 


$ 
135,818 
39,736 


$ 
61,200 


$ 

59,582 
9,590 


$ 
207,960 
45,n7 


$ 

31,063 
10,878 


$ 

38,837 
8,326 


475,664 
64,068 


20,480 
2,369 


250.403 

30,160 

10,000 

2,530 


96,082 

432 

15,000 

3,264 


45,706 

1,940 

1,500 

544 


49,992 

1,730 

6,000 

559 


162.613 

6,909 
21.150 

4.541 


20,185 

2,256 

5.500 

977 


30,511 

1,147 
600 


7,146 


372 


371 


71,214 
8,366 


2,741 


42,690 
12,002 


18,696 
9.532 


3.984 


8,289 
130 


32.600 
10,448 


8,733 


2,118 












8,288 












231 




83 


















16,654 




12,002 
121,332 


9,532 
67,137 




130 
52,759 


10,679 
151,853 




83 


38,887 


21,042 


36,999 


30.949 


24,099 


602,419 


44,263 


426,427 


191,447 


86,689 


111,170 


357,745 


59,867 


56,811 


211,073 








2,134 
158 
553 




16,867 

315 

3,235 






3,513 


2 
88 


234 
4,996 


346 
1,242 


726 
376 




1,792 


11,399 


152 


140 


225,985 
38,887 


90 
21.042 


5,230 
121,332 


1.588 
67.137 


2,845 
36,999 


1,102 
52.759 


20,417 
151.853 


152 
30,949 


1,932 
24,099 




















38,887 
19.927 


21,042 
4,000 


121,332 
85,000 


67,137 
15,000 


36,999 
5.166 


52.759 
9.500 


151.853 
34.556 


30,949 
4,500 


24,099 
6,200 


317,620 


19,131 


214.865 


107,722 


41,679 


47.809 


150,919 


24,266 


24,580 


337.547 


23,131 


299,865 


122,722 


46,845 


57.309 


185.475 


28,766 


30.780 


602,419 


44,263 


426,427 


191.447 


86,689 


111.170 


357,745 


59,867 


56,811 


215,997 
4,629 


14,760 
268 


151,793 
2,591 


56,263 
1.867 


24,804 
229 


24.112 
318 


100.969 
2.509 


13,016 
485 


15.195 
45 


220,626 


15,028 


154,384 


58,130 


25,033 


24,430 


103,478 


13,501 


15,240 


123,617 


9,589 


98,930 


43.194 


17,448 


15.243 

• t. 

2.727 
1.806 


60.646 


9,741 


9.917 


18,205 
17,316 
18,793 


1,047 
1,739 


12,610 
12,333 


5,698 
6,490 


1,996 

1,508 

241 

1,801 


15.200 

12.585 

3.840 

4.437 


776 
1,293 


730 

974 

40 


15,543 


904 


8,076 


3,699 


1.627 


1,003 


1,111 




















193,474 


13.279 


131,949 


59,081 


22,994 


21.403 


96,708 


12,813 


12,772 


27,152 


1,749 


22,435 


951 


2,039 


3,027 


6,770 


688 


2,468 


1,447 


135 


1.411 


625 


333 


275 


903 


171 


116 



196 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Dundalk 
902 


Dundas 
13.253 


Dunnville 
5,343 


Durham 
2,101 


Dutton 
803 


East York 


PnniilaJion 


Twp. 
69,627 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
65,564 
13,185 


$ 
1,431,303 
195,925 


$ 
459,390 
85,733 


$ 
170,811 

27,200 


$ 

49.318 
15,802 


$ 
4,442,939 




79U,681 








52,379 

7,819 

6,500 

729 


1,235,378 

27,519 
9,000 
7,140 


373,657 
8,945 


143,611 

24,454 
4,000 
1,727 


33.516 

2.840 

4.500 

758 


3,648,258 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investment in government securities 
Arrniint*; rerpivahle fNet '1 


83,541 
300,000 


27,463 


149,967 






Total current assets 


15,048 


43,659 
12,360 


36,408 
34,187 


30,181 
1,615 


8.098 
49 


533,508 


OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 


35,335 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Miscellaneous . . . 




114,168 


4,845 


1.546 


321 




6,233 










Total other assets 




17,205 
660,366 


35,733 
350,240 


1,936 
145,100 


49 
76.353 


155,736 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


63,352 


2,388,971 




130.779 


1,956.608 


796,038 


320,828 


118,016 


6.726.473 


LIABILITIES 




672.300 
41,621 
33,345 


49,210 

942 

9,717 






562,017 


Accounts payable . ... 


920 
275 


1,482 
1,203 


180 
462 


205,025 


Other 


26,300 






Total liabilities . . 


1,195 
63,352 


747,266 
660,366 


59,869 
350,240 


2,685 
145,100 


642 
76,353 


793,342 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


2,388,971 
















Total reserves. ... 


63,352 
5,727 


660,366 
101,245 


350,240 
91,290 


145,100 
25,324 


76,353 

8,407 

32,614 


2,388,971 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


714,175 




114,168 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


60,505 


447,731 


294.639 


147,719 


2,715,817 


Total capital 


66,232 


548,976 


385,929 


173,043 


41,021 


3,544,160 








130,779 


1 956,608 


796 038 


320,828 


118 016 


6,726,473 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


35,940 
233 


.502,723 
3,329 


217,494 
824 


95,839 
1,106 


24,901 
225 


1,969,971 
77 229 






Total revenue 


36,173 


506,052 


218,318 


96.945 


25,126 


2,047 200 


EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


24,608 


315,231 


147,160 


57.531 


17,046 


1,354,211 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


3,705 
2.269 

1,761 


61,512 
27,944 
41,333 
30,748 


30,852 

16,410 

6,054 

10,551 


11,800 
7,827 


3,908 
2,297 


174,447 
182,729 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


77,546 


—depreciation 

— other 


4,080 


1,519 


104,097 
















Total expense 


32,343 


476,768 


211,027 


81.238 


24,770 


1,893,030 


Net income or net expanse 


3 830 


29 284 


7 291 


15,707 


356 


154 170 


NumbL-r of customers . . 


1 437 


4,208 


1,959 


849 


347 


23,529 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



197 



Eganville 
1,451 


Elmira 
3,284 


Elmvale 
938 


Elmwood 
450 


Elora 
1,493 


Embro 
542 


Erieau 
487 


Erie Beach 
154 


Erin 
1.021 


$ 
160,639 

J^8,9J^6 


$ 
354,231 
81, 6U 


$ 

73,231 
21,587 


$ 

24,885 
7,307 


$ 
124,711 
37,329 


$ 

51.735 
16,383 


$ 

83.884 
15,1^31 


$ 

24,717 
2,160 


63,970 
8,592 


111,693 
21,728 


272,587 
11,535 


51,644 

4,772 

15,948 

1,014 


17,578 

722 

7,000 

193 


87,382 

3,869 
3,690 
1,254 


35,352 

6,503 

6,000 

355 


68,453 

8,515 

7,690 

936 


22,557 


5,5,378 
2 591 


15,000 




5,087 
764 


370 


1,504 


151 


37,098 
3,303 


13,039 
827 


21,734 
2,427 


7,915 


8,813 
198 


12,858 


17,141 
30 


151 


8,442 
56 












1,993 


203 


209 








1,550 


517 


258 













5,296 


1,030 
371,355 


2,636 
63,006 




198 
146,170 




1.580 
41,775 


517 
7,549 


314 


12,127 


22,113 


48,002 


18.714 


166,214 


658,011 


139,020 


47,606 


242,563 


96,212 


128,949 


30,774 


82,848 


35,689 








4,700 

31 

1,632 




9.778 


2,774 

3,402 

243 


3,625 
914 


104 


2,411 
2,616 


337 
600 




2,238 
55 




45 


1.055 


717 






35,793 
12,127 


5.027 
371,355 


937 
63,006 


45 
22,113 


6,363 
146.170 


2,293 
48,002 


10,833 
41,775 


6,419 
7,549 


5,256 
18,714 




















12,127 
64,311 


371,355 
37.169 


63,006 
6,544 


22.113 
6,106 


146,170 
15,162 


48,002 
7,500 


41,775 
12,105 


7,549 
5,526 


18,714 
10,875 


53,983 


244,460 


68,533 


19,342 


74,868 


38,417 


64,236 


11,280 


48,003 


118,294 


281,629 


75.077 


25,448 


90,030 


45,917 


76,341 


16,806 


58,878 


166,214 


658,011 


139,020 


47.606 


242,563 


96,212 


128,949 


30,774 


82,848 



61,485 
686 


200,876 
3,518 


32,714 
1,031 


9,704 
414 


56,270 
165 


22,921 
752 


28,991 
728 


5,724 


35,351 
485 








62,171 


204,394 


33,745 


10,118 


56,435 


23,673 


29,719 


5,724 


35.836 


24,034 
12,012 


158,168 


21,690 


8,002 


33,847 


14,701 


15,715 


2,724 


23,493 


4,407 
5,885 
7,035 


12,497 
13,751 


2,671 
3,794 


710 
1,113 


8,019 

5,693 

615 

3,380 


2,481 
2,278 


3,643 
3,377 
1,898 
2,394 


1,142 
942 
655 
668 


2.635 

3,540 

866 


3,873 


9,231 


2,104 


739 


1,804 


1,593 




















57,246 


193,647 


30,259 


10,564 


51,554 


21,264 


27,027 


6,131 


32,127 


4.925 


10,747 


3,486 


446 


4,881 


2,409 


2,692 


407 


3.709 


566 


1,177 


404 


135 


541 


234 


359 


135 


412 



198 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



l\/fiinirinalitv 


Essex 
3.412 


Etobicoke 
Twp. 
152,204 


Exeter 
3,012 


Fergus 
3,928 


Finch 
382 


Flesherton 


Population 


523 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


$ 
279.390 
78,661 


$ 

16,513.386 

2,607,U66 


$ 
272,386 
68,691^ 


$ 
328,875 
68,565 


$ 

42,570 
10,250 


$ 
36.144 


Accumulated depreciation . . . 


12,537 






Net fixed assets 


200,729 

14,776 

1,450 


13,905,920 

815,846 
134,938 
327,563 


203,692 

250 
5,000 
2,942 


260,310 

19,026 

15,769 

3,169 


32,320 

963 

6,000 

493 


23,607 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


1.566 


Investment in government securities 


20.000 
187 








16,226 
7,162 
1,006 


1,278,347 

292,185 
798,180 
276,207 


8,192 
1,238 


37,964 
230 


7.456 


21.753 


OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 




Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Miscellaneous 






79 


550 




260 








Total other assets . . 


8,168 
166,669 


1,366,572 
3,878,349 


1,317 
223.407 


780 
346,489 




260 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


25.320 


31.522 




391,792 


20,429,188 


436,608 


645,543 


65,096 


77,142 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding , ... 


18,200 

194 

2,422 


7,844,802 
138,359 
387,129 




21,000 

123 

3,834 






Accounts payable . ... ... 


1,035 
2,635 


8 
241 


245 


Other ... 


148 






Total liabilities 


20.816 
166,669 


8,370,290 
3,878,349 


3,670 

223,407 


24,957 
346,489 


249 
25,320 


393 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


31,522 
















Total reserves 


166,669 
33,257 


3,878,349 

1,672,296 
798,180 

5,710,073 


223,407 
20.000 


346,489 
53,961 


25,320 
7,000 


31,522 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


5,831 


Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


171.050 


189.531 


220,136 


32,527 


39,396 


Total capital 


204,307 


8,180,549 


209.531 


274,097 


39,527 


45,227 








391.792 


20.429,188 


436.608 


645.543 


65.096 


77,142 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


113,658 
1,031 


7,463,658 
55,804 


142,454 
3,202 


207,104 
1,423 


14,905 
406 


16,314 


Other 


1,008 




Total revenue 


114,689 


7,519,462 


145,656 


208,527 


15,311 


17,322 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


62,038 


4,605,137 


95,325 


143.305 


11,047 


13,591 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


18,458 

14,303 

3,368 

7,374 


530,239 
383,658 
746,278 
352,123 


10,791 
16,349 


22,173 

15,425 

2,823 

8.105 


1,004 
1,736 


1,337 
1.186 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 


— depreciation 

—other 


7,435 


1,242 


1.140 
















Total expense 


105,541 


6,617,435 


129,900 


191,831 


15,029 


17,254 




Net income or net expense 


9,148 


902,027 


15,756 


16,696 


282 


68 


Number of customers 


1,220 


52.053 


1,258 


1.373 


178 


255 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



199 



Fonthill 
2,404 


Forest 
2,134 


Forest Hill 
20,266 


Frankford 
1,602 


Gait 
27,367 


George- 
town 
10,311 


Glencoe 
1.139 


Goderich 
6,360 


Grand Bend 
874 


$ 
164,583 

28,691 


$ 
159,605 
67,078 


$ 
1,815,173 
5U8,000 


$ 
101,094 
11„0U6 


$ 
3,016,267 
986,089 


$ 
951,595 

151,622 


$ 
118,566 
S5,U99 


$ 
694,337 
1 80,51 8 


$ 
157.727 
37,U20 


135.892 
1,748 


92,527 

2,285 

47,901 

1.711 


1,267,173 

81,579 

247,793 

20,655 


87.048 
10,169 


2,030,178 

42,604 
90,000 
25,659 


799,973 

16,911 

4,000 

498 


83,067 

2,223 

10,000 

2,811 


513,819 

59,585 
90,324 
16,870 


120,307 
5,085 


2,026 


1,146 


4,841 


3,774 
36 


51.897 
6,546 


350,027 
45,852 


11.315 


158,263 
75,738 


21,409 
35,457 


15,034 
372 


166,779 
8,704 


9,926 

185 








1,175 


196 


15,111 




1,092 


795 




1,998 


7,819 










1,211 


6,742 
170,611 


60,963 
1,171,387 




76,830 
2,537,180 


36,252 
556,009 


372 
83,834 


10,702 
569.243 


8,004 


64,579 


23,687 


46,022 


205,456 


321,777 


2,849,550 


122,050 


4,802,451 


1,413,643 


182,307 


1,260,543 


184,259 


12,300 








87,000 

887 

59,065 


299,281 

1,425 

36,030 




74,500 

613 

17,690 


68,570 


419 
2,225 


203 
1,268 


6,090 
41,489 


531 
1,624 


4,127 
580 


186 
6.473 


14,944 
64.579 


1,471 
170,611 


47.579 
1,171,387 


2,155 
23,687 


146,952 
2,537,180 


336,736 

556,009 
2,040 


4,707 
83,834 


92.803 
569,243 


75,229 
46,022 


















64,579 
49.048 


170,611 
23.357 


1,171,387 
358,126 


23,687 
20,000 


2,537,180 
730,298 


558,049 
93,126 


83,834 
20,113 


569,243 
138,460 


46,022 
22.430 


76.885 


126.338 


1,272,458 


76,208 


1,388,021 


425.732 


73.653 


460,037 


40,578 


125,933 


149,695 


1,630,584 


96,208 


2,118,319 


518,858 


93.766 


598,497 


63,008 


205,456 


321,777 


2,849,550 


122,050 


4,802.451 


1,413.643 


182,307 


1,260,543 


184,259 


74,255 
2.109 


76,939 
5,676 


774,421 
12.919 


40,725 
716 


1.325.181 
14.310 


440,732 
2,697 


39,918 
505 


351,830 
6,025 


72,712 
880 


76,364 


82,615 


787,340 


41,441 


1,339,491 


443,429 


40,423 


357,855 


73,592 


48,235 


61,056 


531,614 


25,486 


902.432 


311.304 


25.321 


233,566 


33,858 


4,466 
6,037 
4 582 


10,809 
8,335 


78,452 
73,749 


3,499 

4.441 


137,784 
73,599 
34,207 
82,931 


20,806 
33,926 
29,330 
22,517 


4.947 
6,057 


19,556 

28,935 

9,472 

17.715 


5,782 
10,569 

8,130 


4,384 


3.957 


50,302 


2,641 


3,422 


4,153 




















67,704 


84,157 


734,117 


36,067 


1,230,953 


417,883 


39,747 


309,244 


62,492 


8,660 


1,542 


53,223 


5,374 


108,538 


25,546 


676 


48,611 


11,100 


801 


917 


7,922 


599 


9,158 


3.322 


486 


2.399 


834 



200 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Grand 

Valley 

697 


Granlon 
291 


Gravenhurst 
3,177 


Grimsby 
5,1,55 


Guelph 
39,011 


Hagersviile 




2,066 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
53,906 
; 7,385 


$ 

17,870 
2,998 


$ 
235,885 
63,790 


$ 
346,919 
59, m 


$ 
4,283,098 
605,1 U8 


$ 
154,569 


Accumulated depreciation 


39,831 








36,521 

8,248 

5,500 

206 


14,872 
4,063 


172,095 

3,101 

27,000 

3,045 


287,508 
150 


3,677,950 
64.455 


114,738 


CURRENT ASSETS 


7,286 


Investment in government securities 


18,000 


311 


980 


49.489 


335 








13,954 


4,374 


33,146 
6,509 


1,130 


113,944 
57,334 


25,621 


OTHER ASSETS 


105 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
IVfittrpI la neons 


390 









41 




2,119 


19,031 


197 








Total Other assets 


390 
58,038 


41 
27,681 


6,509 
219,991 


2,119 
135,758 


76,365 
3,054,783 


302 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


297,021 




108,903 


46,968 


431,741 


426,515 


6,923,042 


437,682 


LIABILITIES 




710 




43.000 

11,682 

5,081 


1,803,000 
45,006 
92,436 




Accounts payable . . 


13 
75 


952 

2,854 


3 


Other 


10 


1,595 






Total liabilities 


88 
58,038 


720 
27,681 


3,806 
219,991 


59.763 
135,758 


1,940,442 
3,054,783 


1,598 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


297,021 
















Total reserves 


58,038 
10,794 


27,681 
5,933 


219,991 
44,279 


135,758 
87,344 


3,054,783 
464,745 


297,021 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


8,000 


Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


39,983 


12,634 


163,665 


143,650 


1,463.072 


131,063 


Total capital 


50,777 


18,567 


207,944 


230,994 


1,927,817 


139,063 








108,903 


46,968 


431,741 


426.515 


6.923,042 


437,682 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


28,390 
173 


8,480 
15 


115.077 
2,791 


164,955 
1,.523 


2,020,180 
16,773 


97,153 


Other 


835 






Total revenue 


28,563 


8,495 


117,868 


166,478 


2,036.953 


97,988 


EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


19,312 


4,082 


93,356 


113,768 

15,116 

19,759 

4,307 

8,618 


1,270,380 


64,654 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


1,555 
2,164 

1,697 


291 

1,343 

308 

491 


11.249 
10,368 


205.384 
176,177 
166,274 
96,161 


15,172 
7,632 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 

— depreciation 

— other 




6,174 


4,246 
















Total expense 


24,728 


6,515 


121,147 


161,568 


1,914,376 


91,704 






Net income or net expense 


3,835 


1,980 


3,279 


4,910 


122,577 


6,284 


Number of customers 


324 


122 


1.351 


1,871 


12,475 


773 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



201 



Hamilton 
264.130 


Hanover 
4.378 


Harriston 
1.632 


Harrow 
1,729 


Hastings 
894 


Havelock 
1,277 


Hawkes- 
bury 
8,583 


Hensall 
927 


Hespeler 
4,546 


$ 

24.250.835 

2,3U0,106 


$ 
360.371 

125,293 


$ 
168.506 
38,196 


$ 
215,676 
i.9,097 


$ 

79,004 
25,365 


$ 

99,779 
26,851 


$ 

622,412 
116,277 


$ 

116,161 
31,55U 


$ 
414,975 

60,722 


21.910,729 
3,042,556 


235,078 

3,413 

62.000 

4.540 


130,310 

5,598 
6.895 
1.815 


166.579 

2.116 

11.000 

339 


53,639 

5,453 
11,500 

444 


72,928 

6,955 

39,202 

871 


506,135 
28,138 


84,607 

9,565 
4,000 
1,134 


354,253 

41,681 
40 000 


1.409,182 


4,831 


32,882 


4,451,738 
730,707 


69.953 

15.081 


14.308 
131 


13,455 

4.775 


17,397 


47,028 


32,969 
26.103 


14,699 
81 


114,563 
332 










47.117 


923 




84 




952 


1,133 


162 


282 










777.824 


16.004 
386,940 


131 
158,720 


4.859 
145.914 




952 
56,804 


27,236 
60.588 


243 
82,219 


614 


30.183,250 


31,293 


599,467 


57,323,541 


707,975 


303,469 


330,807 


102,329 


177,712 


626,928 


181,768 


1,068,897 


1.053,000 




1,800 

469 

2.172 






15,000 

3,586 

682 


191,000 

25,336 

6,232 






1.380.176 
139.449 


655 
2,915 


1.542 
1.108 


1,072 
907 


169 
465 


4,675 
3,127 


2,572.625 

30.183.250 
243.542 


3,570 
386,940 


4.441 
158,720 


2,650 
145,914 


1,979 
31,293 


19,268 
56,804 


222,568 
60,588 


634 
82,219 


7,802 
599,467 




















30.426.792 
6.656,892 


386,940 
80,162 


158,720 
28,908 


145,914 
12,000 


31,293 
21,000 


56,804 
47,900 


60,588 
94,000 


82,219 
12,000 


599,467 
77,571 


17,667.232 


237.303 


111,400 


170,243 


48,057 


53,740 


249,772 


86,915 


384,057 


24,324.124 


317,465 


140,308 


182.243 


69,057 


101,640 


343,772 


98,915 


461.628 


57,323,541 


707.975 


303,469 


330,807 


102,329 


177,712 


626,928 


181,768 


1,068,897 



17,002,076 
204,160 


183,751 
4,268 


74,867 
1,538 


89,371 

2,494 


23,881 
667 


35,834 
1,970 


230,108 
2,321 


46,367 
393 


266,485 
3.182 


17,206,236 


188,019 


76,405 


91,865 


24.548 


37,804 


232,429 


46,760 


269,667 


13,107,397 


135,341 


50,140 


57,727 


16,929 


21,574 


108,162 


32,450 


216,827 


1,045,456 
849,214 
113 848 


16,211 
14,959 


7,250 

5,496 

662 

4,187 


8,580 
11,005 


1,803 
4.592 


3,202 
4,865 
2,078 
2,966 


25,120 
34,451 
21,149 
14,832 


3,103 
3,225 


17,506 
12,139 


488,304 


9,813 


5,230 


2,426 


3,323 


9,076 




















15,604,219 


176,324 


67,735 


82,542 


25,750 


34,685 


203,714 


42,101 


255,548 


1,602,017 


11,695 


8,670 


9,323 


1.202 


3,119 


28,715 


4,659 


14,119 


81,824 


1,624 


676 


689 


448 


468 


2,176 


365 


1,469 



202 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



KiTiinirinalitv 


Highgate 
385 


Holstein 
179 


Huntsville 
3,120 


Ingersoll 
7,283 


Iroquois 
1,091 


Jarvis 




762 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


$ 
33,674 
12,718 


$ 

13,144 
3A8J^ 


$ 
247,713 
57.372 


$ 
684,123 
159,00^ 


$ 
202,478 
21,U71 


$ 
61,417 


Arnimiilatpd d<»nreciation 


lU,lJtl 






Net fixed assets 


20,956 

3,275 

3,000 

537 


9,660 

2,458 
500 

42 


190,341 

21,348 

34,950 

6,456 


525,119 
12,051 


181.007 

8.935 

31.000 

969 


47,276 


CURRENT ASSETS 


6,090 


Investment in government securities 




9,833 


346 








6,812 


3,000 


62,754 
8,172 


21,884 
14.505 


40,904 
1,059 


6,436 


OTHER ASSETS 




Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 












3,052 
























8,172 
312,573 


17,557 
768,488 


1,059 
43,678 




Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


36,740 


12,061 


60,534 




64,508 


24,721 


573,840 


1,333,048 


266,648 


114,246 


LIABILITIES 








88,206 

1,680 

13,388 








20 
125 




217 
1,886 


24 
1,995 




Other 


84 


105 






Total liabilities 


145 
36,740 


84 
12,061 


2,103 
312,573 


103,274 
768,488 


2,019 
43,678 


105 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


60,534 


















36,740 
5,000 


12,061 
2,762 


312,573 
15,697 


768.488 
111,594 


43,678 


60,534 


CAPITAL 


10,500 


Local sinking fund 


220,951 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


22,623 


9,814 


243,467 


349,692 


43,107 




27,623 


12,576 


259,164 


461,286 


220,951 


53,607 








64,508 


24,721 


573,840 


1.333,048 


266,648 


114,246 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 
Sales of electric energy 


13,318 
235 


5,985 

17 


145.892 
2,995 


324,389 
2,593 


49,985 
1,093 


24,954 


Other 


3 






Total revenue 


13,553 


6,002 


148,887 


326.982 


51,078 


24,957 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


7,649 


4,675 


91,333 


218,992 


25,686 


16,337 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration... . . . 


880 
904 

1,109 


527 
551 


16,545 
10,008 


34,906 

32,223 

9,109 

16,478 


3,410 
8,482 


718 
2,279 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


— depreciation 

—other 


400 


5,966 


4,624 


1,923 
















Total expense 


10,542 


6,153 


123,852 


311,708 


42,202 


21,257 




Net income or net expense 


3,011 


151 


25,035 


15,274 


8,876 


3,700 


Number of customers . 


164 


96 


1,216 


2,336 


393 


279 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



203 



Kemptville 
1,938 


•Killaloe 

Station 

897 


Kincardine 
2,851 


Kingston 
48,432 


Kingsville 
3,040 


Kirkfield 
178 


Kitchener 
74,522 


Lakefield 
2,127 


Lambeth 
2,025 


$ 
148,514 
28,993 


$ 

58.216 
13.821 


$ 
282,660 
81,926 


$ 
5,576.876 
1,505,797 


$ 
280.235 
78,926 


$ 

21,435 
U,710 


$ 
9,700,673 
2,061,657 


$ 
195,332 
U6,58U 


$ 
117.043 
2U,950 


119,521 
4,317 


44.395 
5.934 


200,734 


4.071.079 

333.558 
180.000 
165.757 


201,309 

1,975 

23.500 

3.654 


16.725 

1.831 

2.000 

288 


7,639,016 

350,533 
300,000 
369,569 


148,748 

13,493 

27,000 

1,523 


92,093 
11,308 


12,000 


15,000 
8,122 


4,551 


4.201 


2.889 


20,868 
10,767 


10.135 


23,122 
966 


679.315 
192.955 


29.129 
2.169 


4.119 


1.020,102 
192,820 


42,016 
5.787 


14.197 












2.455 


364 


153,479 


53 


260 


3,412 


2.803 








10,767 


2.455 


1,330 
230,222 


346,434 
2,078,507 


2.222 
198.066 


260 
13,000 


196,232 
6,243,516 


8.590 
99,131 




126,331 


62,184 






277,487 


56,985 


455,408 


7,175,335 


430,726 


34,104 


15,098,866 


298,485 


168,474 




39,000 
11,867 




1,273,000 

188,302 

6,038 






325,500 
279,611 
130,674 




10,341 


12,112 


1.286 
1,119 


214 
4.405 




1,044 
1,135 


15 


1,335 


6 


2,039 








13,447 
126,331 


50,867 


2,405 
230.222 


1,467,340 

2,078,507 
103.456 


4.619 
198.066 


6 

13,000 


735,785 

6,243,516 
315,268 


2,179 
99.131 


12,395 
62,184 


522 




















126,853 




230,222 
60,000 


2,181,963 
531,839 


198,066 
33.500 


13,000 
5,766 


6,558,784 
2,001,743 


99,131 
33,500 


62.184 


19,507 


1,000 


22.159 


117,680 


5,118 


162,781 


2,994,193 


194,541 


15,332 


5,802,554 


163,675 
197.175 


71,736 


137.187 


6,118 


222,781 


3,526,032 


228.041 


21,098 


7,804,297 


93,895 


277.487 


56,985 


455.408 


7,175,335 


430,726 


34.104 


15,098,866 


298,485 


168,474 


93.359 
2,213 


24,221 
425 


128,749 
2,041 


2,111,063 
42,851 


107.537 
1,657 


6,334 
54 


3,939,183 
48.857 


70.458 
1.229 


60.076 
931 


95,572 


24,646 


130,790 


2,153,914 


109,194 


6,388 


3,988,040 


71,687 


61,007 


68,102 


11,201 


87,785 


1,349.774 


71,177 


3,402 


2,402,395 


46,340 


38,678 


8,140 
7.339 


1,168 
2.390 
3,349 
1,420 


15,230 
8,917 


205,867 
240.696 
137.820 
135,926 


10,108 

15,619 

27 

7,363 


788 
661 


450,196 
284.836 
162.181 
200,041 


4,522 
7,165 


3.160 
4.144 
1.308 


3.656 


7.416 


637 


5,738 


3.298 




















87,237 


19,528 


119,348 


2,070,083 


104,294 


5,488 


3,499,649 


63,765 


50,588 


8,335 


5,118 


11,442 


83,831 


4,900 


900 


488,391 


7,922 


10,419 


768 


293 


1.247 


16.005 


1,261 


106 


24,824 


766 


622 



204 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



M iinirinnlit V 


Lanark 
900 


Lancaster 
597 


Leamington 
8,930 


Lindsay 
11,119 


Lis towel 
3,915 


London 


Population 


161,554 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
57,087 
7.996 


$ 
31,884 

9,8A6 


$ 
732,591 

188.737 


$ 
1,195,117 

33U22 


$ 
406,568 
136.308 


$ 
17,545.166 




3,7^0,000 








49.091 

2,210 

10.000 

463 


22,038 

1.563 
5.500 
1.454 


543,854 

41,398 
2,000 
5,389 


860,995 
400 


270,260 

17.263 

20.000 

2,224 


13,805,166 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


38,288 




306,500 


Accounts receivable (Net) 


8,122 


782,761 






Total current assets 


12,673 
43 


8.517 


48,787 
23,472 


8.522 
15.804 


39,487 
1.023 


1,127,549 


OTHER ASSETS 


552,191 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 









938 




3,477 


101,291 










Total other assets 


43 
32.403 




24,410 
528,005 


15.804 
685,840 


4,500 
373,009 


653,482 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


26.373 


9,843.588 




94,210 


56,928 


1,145,056 


1,571,161 


687,256 


25,429,785 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 






62,500 

3.726 

16.700 




38,408 
4,258 
5,780 


5,255,079 


Accounts payable . 




256 
493 


16,835 
7,833 


1,192,405 


Other 


196 


194,814 






Total liabilities 


196 
32.403 


749 
26,373 


82,926 
528,005 


24,668 
685,840 


48,446 
373,009 


6,642,298 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other . 


9.843,588 
289,583 
















Total reserves 


32.403 
7.316 


26,373 
8,917 


528,005 
63,500 


685,840 
130,000 


373,009 
74,426 


10,133.171 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


1,883,327 


Local sinking fund... 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


54,295 


20.889 


470,625 


730,653 


191,375 


6,770,989 


Total capital 


61,611 


29.806 


534,125 


860,653 


265,801 


8,654,316 




94.210 


56,928 


1,145,056 


1,571,161 


687,256 


25,429,785 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


17,803 
665 


14,232 
466 


385.587 
2.037 


491,956 
24,237 


174.185 
778 


6.331.624 
199.463 


Total revenue . . . 


18,468 


14,698 


387,624 


516,193 


174,963 


6,531,087 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


13,286 


11.012 


256,349 


341.566 


126,554 


4,019.849 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


1,194 
1,493 

1,442 


1.932 
2.231 


25,756 

37,768 

5,436 

19,184 


58.282 
46.557 


12,646 

10,671 

6,518 

11.567 


542.702 
616,820 
382.995 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


— depreciation 

— other 


964 


24.347 


334.863 
















Total expense 


17,415 


16.139 


344,493 


470,752 


167,956 


5.897,229 




Net income or net expense 


1,053 


1J41 


43.131 


45,441 


7,007 


633,858 


Number of customers 


286 


207 


3,323 


3.945 


1.601 


52,203 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



205 



Long 
Branch 
10,814 


L'Orignal 
1,206 


Lucan 
932 


Lucknow 
1,008 


Lynden 
527 


Madoc 
1,485 


Magnetawan 
254 


Markdale 
1,107 


Markham 
4,584 


$ 
631,243 
75,187 


$ 

92,920 
21,982 


$ 

85,297 
2J„S3A 


S 
103,169 
17,113 


$ 

33,955 
11,011 


$ 
153,038 
U0,119 


$ 

25,021 
6,798 


$ 

69,146 
13,n8 


$ 
344,276 
62.070 


556,056 
1,714 


70,938 
3,745 


60,963 

4,981 

5,500 

258 


86,056 

7,012 
9,000 
1,512 


22,944 

10,464 

2,000 

517 


112,919 

8,024 

21,888 

1,947 


18,223 

2,062 

8,946 

81 


55,998 

5,058 

5,694 

326 


282,206 


14,768 




82,028 


321 


.5,233 


98,510 


4,066 


10,739 
51 


17,524 


12,981 


31,859 
5,931 


11,089 
37 


11,078 
190 


5,233 

1,009 












102 


1,878 




474 




100 


490 


112 


367 










102 


1.878 
9,365 


51 

78,460 


474 
96,692 




6,031 
66,440 


527 
3,440 


302 
57,571 


1,376 


371,572 


47,300 


140.414 


1.026.240 


86,247 


150,213 


200.746 


83.225 


217.249 


33.279 


124,949 


429.229 




18,500 
696 
390 










13,800 
4 




43,115 


3 




4.082 


560 
32 


30 
1,211 


496 

742 


8,757 


15,631 


690 


5,730 










15,634 
371,572 


19,586 
9,365 


690 
78,460 


4,082 
96,692 


592 

47,300 


1,241 
66.440 


13,804 
3,440 


1,238 
57,571 


57,602 
140,414 




















371,572 
40,305 


9,365 
9,500 


78,460 
11,214 


96,692 
17,614 


47,300 
4,495 


66,440 
14,000 


3,440 
10,200 


57,571 
6.370 


140,414 
25,672 


k' 598,729 


47,796 


59,849 


82,358 


30,838 


135,568 


5,835 


59,770 


205,541 


K 639,034 


57,296 


71,063 


99,972 


35,333 


149,568 


16,035 


66,140 


231,213 


m 1,026.240 


86 247 


150,213 


200,746 


83,225 


217,249 


33,279 


124.949 


429.229 


m 

422,201 
1,978 


29,117 
789 


35,109 
372 


43,161 
294 


16,409 
494 


49,906 
2,115 


7,428 
307 


39,561 
377 


182,919 
1,605 


424,179 


29,906 


35.481 


43,455 


16.903 


52,021 


7.735 


39,938 


184,524 


257,480 


15,451 


23,862 


28,297 


10,975 


36,678 


3,464 


30,227 


119,276 


36,122 
40,905 


1,495 
2,970 
2,501 
2,752 


2,582 
2,049 


3,907 
4,283 


392 
1,617 


2,913 
4,612 


547 

714 

2,112 

727 


3,053 
2,519 


9,224 
15,685 
6,178 


15,171 


2,571 


2,658 


1,076 


4,394 


1,862 


9,073 




















349.678 


25,169 


31.064 


39.145 


14.060 


48,597 


7,564 


37,661 


159.436 


74,501 


4,737 


4.417 


4,310 


2.843 


3,424 


171 


2.277 


25.088 


4,270 


377 


361 


466 


170 


597 


107 


455 


1.421 



206 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Marmora 
1,302 


Martintown 
430 


Maxville 
839 


Meaford 
3.723 


Merlin 
607 


Merrick- 


Poniilntion 


ville 
880 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
98,929 
33,711 


$ 

30,664 
7,8 U 


$ 
68,756 

12,98i. 


$ 
292.249 

76,U97 


$ 

68.862 
2U.906 


$ 
73,926 




7,176 








65,218 

10,783 

3,000 

937 


22,823 
6,288 


55,772 

5,071 

1,500 

349 


215,752 
27,752 


43.956 
10,907 


66,750 


CURRENT ASSETS 

r'^i^Qh nn hand and in bank . . 


883 


Investment in government securities 




1,399 


2.634 


89 


5,057 






Total current assets 


14,720 
1,979 


7,687 


6,920 


30,386 
8,113 


10,996 
438 


5,940 


OTHER ASSETS 




Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 












469 




352 
















1,979 
47,552 






8,582 
212.570 


438 
44,312 


352 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


12.301 


45,851 


17,250 




129,469 


42,811 


108,543 


467,290 


99,702 


90,292 


LIABILITIES 












13,300 




9 
1,135 


142 
126 


198 
167 


709 
5,701 


37 
143 


2,168 


Other 


860 






Total liabilities 


1,144 
47,552 


268 
12,301 


365 

45,851 


6,410 
212,570 


180 
44,312 


16,328 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


17,250 
















Total reserves 


47,552 
15,092 


12,301 
5,347 

24,895 


45,851 
13,642 


212,570 
47,725 


44,312 
13,122 


17,250 


CAPITAL 


11,700 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


65,681 


48,685 


200,585 


42,088 


45,014 


Total capital 


80,773 


30,242 


62,327 


248,310 


55,210 


56,714 








129,469 


42,811 


108,543 


467,290 


99,702 


90,292 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


46,201 
374 


8,963 

74 


25,353 
227 


154,095 
2,615 


21,045 
2,604 


25,232 


Other 


20 








46,575 


9,037 


25.580 


156,710 


23,649 


25,252 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


27,802 


6,243 


20,027 


121,061 


12,728 


17,936 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Fixed charges— interest and principal 

— depreciation 

— other 


5,318 
3,751 

2,861 


717 
956 

885 


1.949 
1,225 


14,545 
12,569 


1,876 

4,774 


1,275 
2,620 
1,811 


1,941 


7,133 


1,989 


1,798 
















Total expense. . . 


39,732 


8,801 


25,142 


155,308 


21,367 


25,440 






Net income or net expense 


6,843 


236 


438 


1,402 


2,282 


188 


Xumber of customers 


521 


125 


317 


1,527 


254 


358 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



207 



I 



\ 



Midland 
8,718 


Mildmay 
869 


Millbrook 
861 


Milton 
5,488 


Milverton 
1,059 


Mimico 
17,566 


Mitchell 
2,243 


Moore field 
313 


Morrisburg 
1,806 


$ 
731,972 
275,021 


$ 

54,581 
6,6W 


$ 

62,614 
11,918 


$ 
569,331 
119,531 


$ 

89,523 
21,601 


$ 
1.092.265 

286,6^2 


$ 
274,487 
71,9U1 


$ 

24.560 
7,176 


$ 
232,017 
32,9U6 


456,951 

13,843 
140.000 


47,941 

986 

7,500 

160 


50,6^6 

127 

11,000 

1,209 


449,800 
36,610 


67,922 

12,163 
13,000 
2,272 


805,623 

87,245 
65,000 
32,713 


202,546 

2,351 

23,000 

4,762 


17.384 

1,251 

1,000 

185 


199,071 

22,260 

11,000 

1,500 


29,771 


3,564 


183,614 
9.885 


8,646 


12,336 

772 


40,174 
2.684 


27,435 
80 


184,958 
18,555 


30,113 
11,578 


2,436 
20 


34,760 
7,380 




984 




582 


537 




1,794 


265 
















10,869 




1,354 
24,591 


3,221 
446,052 


80 
159,490 


20,349 
716.402 


11,843 
201,212 


20 
26,615 


7.380 
69,651 


904.715 


34,051 


1,556,149 


90,638 


88,977 


939,247 


254,927 


1,727,332 


445,714 


46,455 


310,862 








68,047 

616 

7,506 


11,200 


75,000 
40,510 
31,248 


14,900 

48 

1,771 






1,797 


724 
221 


33 
836 


1.489 
479 


598 


3,099 


301 


2,869 


4,896 
904,715 


945 
34,051 


869 
24,591 


76,169 
446,052 


11,501 
159,490 


146,758 
716,402 


16,719 
201.212 


1.968 
26,615 


3.467 
69,651 




















904,715 
111,945 


34,051 
12,304 


24,591 
9,000 


446,052 
56,035 


159,490 
13,060 


716,402 
175,868 


201.212 
32.209 


26,615 
4,500 


69,651 
31,636 


534,593 


43,338 


54,517 


360,991 


70,876 


688,304 


195.574 


13,372 


206,108 


646,538 


55,642 


63,517 


417,026 


83,936 


864.172 


227,783 


17,872 


237.744 


1,556,149 


90,638 


88,977 


939,247 


254,927 


1,727,332 


445,714 


46,455 


310,862 


348,898 
6,299 


26,792 
536 


25,400 
590 


250,495 
4,627 


54,325 
745 


511,568 
20,480 


120,883 
2,434 


12,787 
38 


71,263 
2,903 


355,197 


27,328 


25,990 


255,122 


55,070 


532,048 


123,317 


12,825 


74,166 


287,144 


18,452 


19,060 


155,328 


34,146 


336,927 


78,555 


10.760 


45,470 


33,452 
24,197 


3,035 
2,133 


3,355 
3,134 


15,182 

27,807 

7,423 

13,695 


6,930 
5,067 
1,150 
2,320 


27.994 

78,429 

9,304 

26,688 


12,673 

11,328 

1,837 

6,508 


1,176 
546 


13,739 
13,782 


21,772 


1,321 


1,721 


758 


5,542 


















366,565 


24,941 


27,270 


219,435 


49,613 


479,342 


110,901 


13,240 


78,533 


11,368 


2,387 


1,280 


35,687 


5,457 


52,706 


12,416 


415 


4,367 


2,902 


317 


335 


1,784 


479 


6.808 


917 


137 


743 



208 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Mount 

Brydges 

993 


Mount 
Forest 
2,576 


Napanee 
4,507 


Neustadt 
499 


Newboro 
284 




Population 


552 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 
FIXED ASSETS 


$ 

70,999 
10,688 


$ 
184.747 
U,H7 


$ 
402,385 
118.858 


$ 

37,066 
15,257 


$ 

31,744 
6,U7 


$ 
58,375 




1 8,885 






Net fixed as'^ets . . . 


60,311 

2.433 

917 


139,800 

22,593 

20,000 

2.690 


283,527 

100 
27,000 
29,925 


21,809 


25,597 


39 490 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


3.227 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 


19.200 
154 


3,000 
615 


3.fX)0 
316 








3,350 


45.283 
1.842 


57,025 
9.161 


19,354 
30 


3,615 


6,543 


OTHER ASSETS 




Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 


405 








1,443 




1,661 


737 












405 
35,715 


1.842 
174.400 


10,604 
293,449 


30 
28,037 


1,661 
3,850 


737 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


9,872 




99.781 


361,325 


644,605 


69.230 


34,723 


56,642 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


14,200 

2,363 

524 








8,021 
694 
139 


3,050 


Accounts payable 

Other 


331 
1.191 


27,240 
5,716 


297 
184 


940 
246 






Total liabilities 


17,087 
35,715 


1.522 
174,400 


32,956 
293,449 


481 
28,037 


8,854 
3,850 


4,236 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


9.872 
















Total reserves 


35,715 
4,984 

41.995 


174,400 
21,627 


293,449 
70,000 


28,037 
15,504 


3.850 
8,979 


9.872 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


10.950 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


163.776 


248,200 


25,208 


13,040 


31,584 


Total capital 


46.979 


185.403 


318,200 


40,712 


22,019 


42,534 








99,781 


361.325 644,605 


69,230 


34.723 


56.642 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


28.666 
62 


105,642 
2,063 


179.149 
26.615 


11,502 
798 


8.072 
94 


18,669 


Other 


279 






Total revenue 


28,728 


107,705 


205,764 


12.300 


8,166 


18,948 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


15,256 


76,956 


131,323 


10,406 


3,911 


10,388 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


2,355 
3,119 
1,330 
1,926 


6,639 
9,200 


18,167 

39,136 

879 

9,277 


1,024 
1,872 


865 
1,227 
1,144 

902 


1,474 
2,053 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


850 


— depreciation 

—other 


4,625 


1,261 


1,808 
















Total expense 


23,986 


97.420 


198.782 


14.563 


8.049 


16,573 


Net income or net expense 


4,742 


10,285 


6,982 


2,263 


117 


2.375 


Number of customers 


362 


1.025 


1.701 


208 


148 


193 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



209 



Newbury 
334 


Newcastle 
1,195 


New 

Hamburg 

2,129 


Newmarket 
8.087 


New 
Toronto 
11,717 


Niagara 
2.620 


Niagara 

Falls 
22,192 


North York 
Twp. 
257,209 


Norwich 
1,687 


$ 

25,425 
8.6^5 


$ 
127,307 
3U32 


$ 
159,955 
37,W3 


$ 
730,441 
1U8,287 


$ 
985,457 
200,050 


$ 
265.287 
60,261 


$ 
2,467,789 
631,782 


$ 

22,395,620 

3,159.356 


$ 
111,530 

i0,i72 


16,780 
1,125 


93,175 


122,552 

17,482 

15,000 

1,545 


582,154 
29,625 


785,407 

153,734 
80,000 
15,708 


205,026 

14,622 
10,000 
3,044 


1,836,(X)7 

127,683 
55,000 
59,828 


19,236.264 

1,360.423 

10.000 

210.457 


71,058 
6,840 


6,500 
867 


4,000 
1,794 


7,500 


9,224 


2,555 


8,492 
30 


5,794 
1,766 


34,027 
1.802 


38,849 
336 


249,442 
20,462 


27,666 
15.863 


242,511 
88,684 


1.580,880 

725,161 
617,710 
265,624 


16,895 
4,931 


144 


284 




440 


949 


38 


1,933 


27 








174 
18,106 


2,050 
46,879 


1,802 
194.017 


776 
252,731 


21,411 
2,351,959 


15,901 
174,420 


90,617 
2,388,305 


1,608,495 
5,068,991 


4,958 
142,752 


43.552 


147,898 


352,398 


874,510 


3,408,219 


423,013 


4,557,440 


27,494,630 


235,663 




13.000 

1.329 

744 


9.000 

21 

208 


55,435 
18,912 
7,737 




22,759 

976 

2,819 




9,047,147 
193,066 
743,672 




188 
120 


570 
21,233 


298 
47,465 


13 

1,415 


308 
18,106 


15,073 
46,879 


9.229 
194.017 


82,084 
252,731 


21,803 
2,351,959 


26,554 
174,420 


47,763 
2,388,305 


9,983,885 
5,068,991 


1,428 
142,752 




















18,106 
9,754 


46,879 
16,000 


194,017 
23,264 


252,731 
39,466 


2,351,959 
8,000 


174.420 
57,749 


2,388,305 
690,243 


5,068,991 

2,721,595 
617,710 

9,102,449 


142,752 
13,756 


15,384 


69,946 


125,888 


500,229 


1.026,457 


164,290 


1,431,129 


77,727 


25,138 


85,945 


149,152 


539,695 


1,034,457 


222,039 


2,121,372 


12,441,754 


91,483 


43.552 


147,898 


352.398 


874.510 


3.408,219 


423,013 


4,557,440 


27,494 630 


235,663 



7,353 
309 


49,201 
1,034 


82.181 
784 


■ 

386.885 
1.135 


1,245,685 
11,500 


105.259 
1,752 


1,028,323 
5,413 


10,8-11,730 
186,618 


60,522 
2,518 


7,662 


50,235 


82,965 


.388,020 


1.257,185 


107,011 


1,033,736 


11,028 318 


63,040 


4,850 


31,142 


56,139 


264,344 


1,088,963 


68,581 


590,257 


6,637,467 


37,127 


1,027 
877 


3,757 
7,219 
1,840 
3,326 


7,207 
5,497 
1,401 
4,127 


17,890 

21,119 

6,429 

18,585 


30,948 
61,348 


14,348 
8,824 
3.210 
6.632 


145,710 
84,730 


832,171 
952,733 
823,054 
508,420 


14,357 
5,718 


847 


24,350 


59,378 


2,703 




















7,601 


47,284 


74,371 


328,367 


1.205,609 


101,595 


880 075 


9,753.845 


59,905 


61 


2,951 


8.594 


59,653 


51.576 


5,416 


153,661 


1 274,503 


3,135 


134 


481 


718 


2.739 


3.960 


1,072 


7,435 


8.'3,377 


fS91 



;io 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Norwood 
1,077 


Oakville- 

Trafalgar 

42,2.54 


Oil Springs 
481 


Omemee 
829 


Orangeville 
4,693 


Orillia 


Pnniilation 


14,635 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 
FIXED ASSETS 


s 

110,516 
30,598 


$ 
4,553,587 
692,522 


$ 
62,591 

22,556 


$ 

70,316 
23,780 


$ 
333,337 
78,383 


$ 
4,735,639 




1,081,968 








79.918 

5,720 

15,000 

2,839 


3,861,065 
100,639 


40,035 

4,573 

11.000 

105 


46,536 


254,954 
2,309 


3,653,671 


CURRENT ASSETS 


365 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 


11,000 
188 


110,261 


125,606 


4,726 


101,887 






Total current assets 


23.559 


226,245 
92,832 


15,678 
502 


11,188 
2,938 


7.035 
3,808 


212.513 


OTHER ASSETS 


56,860 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Miscellaneous 


1,390 




57,155 


682 




1.005 


430 








Total other assets 


1,390 
44,628 


149,987 
756,381 


1,184 
78,494 


2.938 
26,794 


4.813 
256,618 


57,290 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


127,517 




149,495 


4,993,678 


135,391 


87.456 


523,420 


4,050,991 


LIABILITIES 




1,894.905 

57,394 

131,412 








871,000 




560 
962 


290 
345 


2.172 
239 


1,432 
3,307 


30,811 


Other 


15,166 






Total liabilities 


1,522 
44.628 


2,083,711 
756,381 


635 
78,494 


2,411 
26,794 


4,739 
256,618 


916,977 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


127,517 
111,363 


















44.628 
55.100 


756,381 
371,683 


78,494 
16,721 


26,794 
12,000 


256,618 
25,594 


238,880 


CAPITAL 


1,741,000 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


48,245 


1,781,903 


39,541 


46,251 


236,469 


1,154,134 


Total capital 


103,345 


2,153,586 


56,262 


58,251 


262,063 


2,895,134 








149.495 


4,993.678 


135,391 


87,456 


523,420 


4,050,991 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 
Sales of electric energy 


33.496 
905 


2,056,905 
46,724 


17,675 
1,547 


25,504 
664 


193,968 
532 


752,703 


Other 


5,440 






Total revenue 


34,401 


2,103,629 


19,222 


26,168 


194.500 


758,143 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased .... 


26,423 


1,378.477 


10,071 


16,346 


130,127 


200,205 


Local generation 


135,179 


Operation and maintenance 


1,856 
3,063 

3,475 


145,991 

177,515 

170,221 

92,175 


1,948 
2,665 


4,768 
2,594 


11,607 
14,360 


97,043 
94,492 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 

— depreciation 

— other 


136,871 


1,943 


2,170 


9,040 


99,039 
















Total expense 


34,817 


1,964,379 


16,627 


25,878 


165,134 


762.829 






Net income or net expense 


416 


139.250 


2,595 


290 


29,366 


4,686 


Number of customers 


403 


11,988 


230 


312 


1.746 


5,490 



I 



Statements A and B 

Statements for^the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



211 



Orono 
845 


Oshawa 
61,350 


Ottawa 
289,236 


Otterville 
767 


Owen Sound 
17,732 


Paisley 
748 


Palmerston 
1,518 


Paris 
5.790 


Parkhill 
1,135 


$ 
74,119 

19,978 


$ 
7,005,563 

l,515,Jt00 


$ 

30,613.949 

6.381,975 


$ 

56,036 
22,016 


$ 
1.550.012 
356.^56 


$ 

80,949 
1 9,695 


$ 
189,267 

U9,268 


$ 
543,129 
1U9,210 


$ 
130.135 
2I„U07 


54,141 

20 
8,000 


5,490.163 

234,778 
400.000 
264,424 


24,231.974 

418.724 
543.000 
920.324 


34.020 
6.203 


1,193.556 

48.475 
70,000 
62,420 


61,254 

491 

11,000 

326 


139,999 

5,584 


393.919 
15.491 


105,728 

5,929 
6000 


537 


127 


2.376 


3.509 


2,826 


8,557 
2.923 


899,202 
121,207 


1.882.048 
377.234 


6.330 


180.895 
46.438 


11,817 


7,960 
185 


19.000 
874 


14,755 
136 










40 


9,827 


14,847 




2.493 


195 




124 


145 










2,963 
23,179 


131,034 
4,041,545 


392.081 
6.542.632 


41.251 


48,931 
1.217,400 


195 

52.078 


185 
176,537 


998 
466,883 


281 
92.128 


88,840 


10,561,944 


33,048,735 


81,601 


2,640,782 


125,344 


324,681 


880,800 


212,892 




321,000 
239.123 
125,763 


4,941,000 

778.023 

882 




31,000 
38,923 
21,575 




14,000 
6,234 
1,949 


85.200 

4 

2.342 


7.700 


659 
480 


305 
269 


309 
411 


239 
1.408 


1,139 
23.179 


685.886 
4.041.545 


5.719.905 

6.542.632 
436.847 


574 
41.251 


91,498 

1,217,400 
654 


720 
52,078 


22,183 
176,537 


87.546 
466.883 


9.347 
92.128 
















23.179 
8,000 


4.041,545 
481.623 


6.979.479 
4.949.698 


41.251 
4,500 


1,218,054 
176.718 


52,078 
13,623 


176,537 
28,000 


466,883 
110.306 


92.128 
22.046 


56,522 


5.352.890 


15,399.653 


35.276 


1,154,512 


58,923 


97,961 


216.065 


89.371 


64.522 


5.834.513 


20.349,351 


39,776 


1,331,230 


72,546 


125,961 


326.371 


111.417 


88.840 


10.561,944 


33,048,735 


81,601 


2,640,782 


125,344 


324,681 


880,800 


212,892 


30.091 
1,116 


3.010.226 
103,101 


10,832,687 
221,489 


23,222 
210 


650,351 
29,975 


27.868 
692 


63,216 
168 


203.535 
480 


58.892 
543 


31,207 


3,113,327 


11,054,176 


23,432 


680,326 


28,560 


63,384 


204,015 


59,435 


19.924 


2.260.493 


6,470,033 
215,342 

1,095,558 

752.336 

553.590 

799.970 

28,763 


16.047 


410.793 


17,151 


39.878 


126,872 


38,356 


2,971 
5.653 


216.025 

195.117 

58,631 

164,035 


1.372 
1,966 


78,348 

78.803 

8.433 

34.228 


3,046 
3,680 


7.278 
9.240 
2.601 
5.048 


19,476 

19,017 

9,078 

14,832 


4,081 
5.282 
1.080 


1.903 


1,837 


2.116 


3.379 


















30,451 


2,894,301 


9,915,592 


21,222 


610,605 


25,993 


64.045 


189,275 


52,178 


756 


219.026 


1,138,584 


2,210 


69,721 


2,567 


661 


14,740 


7.257 


370 


19.850 


90,604 


296 


6.228 


328 


619 


1.977 


503 



212 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Parry 
Sound 
6,137 


Penetang- 

uishene 

4,664 


Perth 
5,663 


Peter- 
borough 
46,803 


Petrolia 
3,670 


Pickering 


Population . . 


1,752 






A BALANCE SHEETS 
FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
921,057 
2^0.813 


$ 
297,915 
109,U86 


$ 
450,312 
135,821^ 


$ 
6,054,498 
1,695.981, 


$ 
358.036 
105,971 


$ 
115,940 




21,0hl 








680,244 

350 

16,408 

4,350 


188,429 

8,622 

75,000 

1,520 


314,488 

2,741 

45.000 

2,047 


4,358,514 
50.779 


252.065 

10.267 
15.053 
12.792 


94,899 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Ca*<h on hand and in bank 


5,604 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) ... 




197,913 


3,242 






Total current assets 


21,108 
4,549 


85,142 
833 


49,788 
8.416 


248,692 
53,767 


38,112 
16,824 


8,846 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores 


278 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 




274 




14,707 


917 


3,033 










Total other assets 


4.549 
70,643 


1,107 
263,358 


8.416 
377.121 


68,474 
2,646,811 


17,741 
364,535 


3,311 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


8,590 




776.544 


538,036 


749,813 


7,322,491 


672,453 


115,646 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


63.000 

5,518 

10,714 






870.300 

145,606 

7,971 




70 000 


Accounts payable 


112 
1.748 


7.004 
4.708 


4,235 
4,689 


1,720 


Other 


1,483 






Total liabilities 


79,232 

70,643 
2.310 


1,860 
253,358 


11,712 
377,121 


1.023.877 
2,646.811 


8,924 
364,535 


73,203 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


8,590 














Total reserves. . . . 


72,953 
405,500 


263,358 
36,983 


377,121 
85.045 


2,646.811 
889.311 


364,535 
50,000 


8 590 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed . . . 


3,694 


Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


218,859 


235,835 


275.935 


2,762.492 


248,994 


30,159 


Total capital 


624,359 


272,818 


360.980 


3,651,803 


298,994 


33,853 








776.544 


538,036 


749813 


7.322,491 


672,453 


115.646 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


224,907 
3,015 


130,287 
4,314 


200.205 
4,698 


2,095.997 
17,807 


136,428 
2,077 


59,278 
1,041 




Total revenue 


227.922 


134,601 


204,903 


2,113,804 


138,505 


60,319 


EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


88.573 
33.401 
27.734 
29.359 
5,857 
21,059 


93,774 


161.867 


1,313,470 


65,087 


31,818 


Local generation 


Ofxjration and maintenance 

Administration 

Fixed charges— interest and principal 


14,145 
13,217 


13.407 
19.527 


225,687 

144,784 

93,956 

149,318 


21,815 
21,429 


4,217 
4,832 

7.015 


— depreciation 

—other 


8,935 




11.030 


9,305 


3,082 
















Total expense 


205,983 


130.071 


205,831 


1,927,215 


117,636 


50 964 






Net income or net expense 


21.939 


4,530 


928 


186.589 


20,869 


9,355 


Number fif ciistomt-rs 


2.063 


1,397 


2.023 


15,043 


1,319 


519 



Statements A and B 

Statements for ^he Year Ended December 31, 1961 



213 



Picton 
4.739 


Plattsville 
484 


Point 

Edward 

2,762 


Port 

Burwell 

766 


Port 

Colborne 

14.949 


Port Credit 
6,736 


Port Dover 
3,037 


Port Elgin 
1,733 


Port Hope 

8,100 


$ 
474.753 
139,797 


$ 

48,212 
3.9^7 


$ 
283,582 
6U,119 


$ 

81,248 
29,6W 


$ 
1.103.881 
1^8,668 


$ 
706.041 
119,U85 


$ 
309,570 
81,179 


$ 
216,515 
38,U93 


837,787 
218.265 


334,956 

4,710 
2.000 


44.265 

2.164 

4,500 

184 


219.463 

4.710 
5.000 
5.992 


51,608 
2.846 


955.213 

32.485 
10.000 
4,608 


586.556 

33,597 
13.500 
4,599 


228.391 
10,909 


178,022 

4.378 
1.500 
2.397 


619,522 
63,096 


2.727 


762 


2,839 


2,901 


9.437 
12,686 


6,848 
26 


15,702 
262 


3.608 
228 


47,093 
14,677 


51,696 
5.411 


13,748 
308 


8.275 
3,574 


65,997 
32,748 






1,063 


958 


10,711 


3,594 


















12.686 
327.550 


26 
52,082 


1,325 
375,346 


1,186 
19,491 


25,388 
600,961 


9,005 
397,701 


308 
159,368 


3.574 
108.977 


32,748 
553,173 


684,629 


103,221 


611,836 


75,893 


1.628,655 


1,044,958 


401,815 


298,848 


1,271,440 


20.529 




2,033 
2,157 


31,000 

3 

3,409 


105,143 

7,232 

12,820 


40,400 

3,963 

10,142 


66,224 

19 

8,348 




71,100 
368 


2,248 




1,914 


12,997 




41,599 










35,774 




4.190 
375.346 


34,412 
19,491 


125,195 
600,961 


54.505 
397.701 


74,591 
159.368 


1,914 
108,977 


113,067 


327,550 


52,082 


553,173 




















327.550 
42,654 


52,082 
5.237 


375,346 
17,000 


19,491 
9,000 


600,961 
237,857 


397,701 
97.283 


159.368 
42.304 


108,977 
37,787 


553,173 
172,900 


278,651 


45.902 


215,300 


12,990 


664,642 


495.469 


125.552 


150,170 


432,300 


321,305 


51.139 


232,300 


21,990 


902,499 


592,752 


167,856 


187,957 


605,200 


684,629 


103.221 


611,836 


75.893 


1,628,655 


1,044,958 


401.815 


298,848 


1,271.440 



205,993 
2,084 


29,177 
332 


183,162 
4.497 


26,027 
203 


418,321 
1,734 


608,698 
8,975 


134,458 
188 


93,884 
1,014 


410,965 
1,836 


208,077 


29,509 


187,659 


26,230 


420,055 


617.673 


134,646 


94,898 


412801 


141,058 


25.764 


159,569 


10,594 


239,336 


510,173 


86,024 


50,151 


252,107 


14,525 

15,996 

7,397 


942 
636 


14,883 

21,567 

924 

7,273 


6,210 
3,126 
2,919 
2,639 


54,281 
55,937 
15,902 
25,401 


19,090 

30,618 

9,111 

15,236 


13,272 

10,353 

6,267 

8,634 


15,377 
12,784 


36,122 
41,151 
19,063 


12,821 


1.234 


4,877 


20,106 




















191.797 


28,576 


204.216 


25,488 


390.857 


584,228 


124,550 


83,189 


368,549 


16,280 


933 


16,557 


742 


29,198 


33,445 


10,096 


11.709 


44,252 


1,795 


195 


842 


480 


4,704 


2.818 


1,574 


1,084 


2.774 



214 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Municipality 


Port 

McNicolI 

1.056 


Port Perry 
2,291 


Port Rowan 
789 


Port 

Stanley 
1.457 


Prescott 
5,255 


Preston 


Population 


11,543 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


$ 
95,121 
16,868 


$ 
153,710 
28,707 


$ 

69,487 
1U,863 


$ 
192.376 
67,976 


$ 
329.415 
104.521 


$ 
1.313.186 




296,681 






Net fixed assets 


78.253 

26,000 
4,133 


125,003 


54.624 
1,543 


124,400 

4.525 
9,000 
4.142 


224,894 

5,138 
30,000 
13,815 


1.016,505 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


33,185 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 


16,000 
7,324 


30,000 


254 


9.970 






Total current assets . . 


30,133 
2,573 


23,324 
160 


1,797 
276 


17.667 
547 


48,953 
10,607 


73.155 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores 


38,319 


Sinking fund on local debentures . 




Miscellaneous 


340 


2,248 


189 


175 




75 








Total other assets 


2,913 
67,357 


2,408 
104,351 


465 
34,307 


722 
174,566 


10,607 
288,060 


38,394 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


1,069,114 




178,656 


255,086 


91,193 


317,355 


572,514 


2,197,168 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 












187,320 


Accounts payable 


981 
367 


2,994 
1,889 


693 
300 




779 
3,639 


2,383 


Other 


1,017 


65 256 






Total liabilities 


1,348 
67,357 


4,883 
104,351 


993 
34,307 


1,017 
174,566 


4,418 
288,060 


254,959 
1.069,114 


RESERVES 
Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 
















Total reserves 


67,357 
9,804 


104,351 
19.882 


34,307 
11,000 


174,566 
18,950 


288,060 
23.981 


1,069,114 
288,963 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Local sinking fund 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


100,147 


125,970 


44,893 


122,822 


256.055 




584,132 


Total capital 


109,951 


145,852 


55.893 


141,772 


280,036 


873.095 






178,656 


255.086 


91,193 


317.355 


572,514 


2,197,168 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 
Sales of electric energy 


53,669 
1,782 


68,647 
1,834 


18,257 
19 


74,316 
761 


170,564 
2,225 


530,696 
5,524 


Other 




Total revenue 


55,451 


70,481 


18,276 


75,077 


172,789 


536,220 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


37,383 


54.579 


10.906 


44,593 


129,758 


325,974 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


4,503 
3,964 

2,364 


7,681 
7.584 


1,596 
1,922 


10,969 
11,374 


11,490 
17,615 


65,842 
33,695 
30,898 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 


— depreciation 

— other 


4.210 


1,823 


5,870 


9,760 


32,663 
















Total expense 


48,2ir 


74,054 


16,247 


72,806 


168,623 


489,072 






Net income or net expense 


7.237 


3,573 


2,029 


2,271 


4,166 


47,148 


Number of customers 


513 


839 


298 


1.138 


1,742 


3,328 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



215 



Priceville 
150 


Princeton 
418 


Queenston 
506 


Renfrew 
8,461 


Richmond 
1,188 


Richmond 

Hill 

17,242 


Ridgetown 
2,560 


Ripley 
443 


Riverside 
17,911 


$ 

16.195 
6,071 


$ 

33,582 
7.U9U 


$ 

45,898 
8,005 


$ 
1,411,259 
310,61^3 


$ 

97,209 
10,U72 


$ 
1,245,927 
163,988 


$ 
201,402 
38,938 


$ 

37,387 
8,1,71 


$ 
898,640 
2^5,^29 


10,124 

2.792 
5,500 


26,088 

4,368 

3.000 

490 


37,893 

1.985 

8,000 

802 


1,100.616 

6.594 
45,000 
33,983 


86,737 

8,444 


1,081,939 
13,578 


162,464 

13,879 

15,043 

1,748 


28,916 

8.034 

15.000 

115 


653,211 
4,230 


116 


1,723 


32,223 


20,270 


8,408 


7,858 


10,787 


85,577 
13,693 


10,167 
71 


45,801 
22,535 


30,670 
9 


23,149 


24,500 
22,936 
















577 


167 


13,762 


3,392 


1,773 


5,172 














14,270 
147,183 


238 
26,609 


36,297 
281,260 


3,401 
179,453 


1,773 
37,721 


28,108 
472,101 


4,773 


40,230 


33,259 


23.305 


74,176 


81,939 


1,347,646 


123,751 


1,445,297 


375,988 


91,559 


1,177,920 


3,000 


1,750 




168,295 

1,806 

25,423 


5,900 

21,393 

911 


568,083 
31,291 
40,106 


44,726 
2,951 
6,116 




42,700 


96 


51 
145 


156 
448 


846 


71 


626 


17,637 


3,167 
4.773 


2,376 
40,230 


196 
33,259 


195,524 
147,183 


28,204 
26,609 


639,480 
281,260 


53,793 
179,453 


604 
37,721 


61,183 
472,101 


















4.773 
9,166 


40,230 
4,245 


33,259 
9,500 


147,183 
602,942 


26,609 
7,987 


281,260 
101,638 


179,453 
36,730 


37,721 
12,744 


472.101 
152,700 


6,199 


27,325 


38,984 


401,997 


60,951 


422,919 


106,012 


40,490 


491,936 


15,365 


31,570 


48,484 


1,004,939 


68,938 


524,557 


142,742 


53,234 


644,636 


23.305 


74,176 


81,939 


1,347.646 


123,751 


1,445,297 


375,988 


91,559 


1.177.920 



3,913 
285 


14,351 
178 


19,329 
631 


300,599 
4,088 


34,304 
2 


605,336 
9.103 


98,414 
2,107 


16,655 
838 


408,396 
6,171 


4,198 


14,529 


19,960 


304,687 


34,306 


614,439 


100,521 


17,493 


414,567 


1,950 


9,997 


15,081 


163.102 
31,390 
21,162 
29,774 
19.790 
29,838 


21,330 


399,676 


57,125 


12,320 


271,802 


528 
461 
412 


800 

1,237 

355 

986 


872 
1,243 


1,984 
1,302 
1,760 
2,419 


36.224 
46,639 
53,126 
27,863 


8,429 

12,961 

5,203 

5,451 


1,175 
1,541 


38,859 
54,595 
13,607 


552 


1.219 


1,110 


22,729 




















3,903 


13,375 


18,415 


295,056 


28,795 


563,528 


89,169 


16.146 


401,592 


295 


1,154 


1,545 


9,631 


5,511 


50,911 


11,352 


1,.^47 


12,975 


62 


168 


175 


2,601 


347 


4,845 


1,056 


218 


5,442 



216 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Municipality 

Population 


Rockland 
2,980 


Rockwood 

857 


Rodney 
1,105 


Rosseau 
231 


Russell 
556 


St. 

Catharines 

83.736 


A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
117.219 

H,162 


$ 

50,373 
11,690 


$ 

66,311 
23,677 


$ 

24,773 
6,038 


$ 

50,072 
7,3 n 


$ 
8,074.347 




l,i.29,063 








103,057 
2,820 
2,626 


38,683 

4,952 

1,500 

12 


42,634 


18,735 

3,263 

2,500 

259 


42,758 

3,932 

12,000 

2,062 


6.645,284 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank . 


291,233 


Investment in government securities 


5.200 
322 


100,000 
425,479 








5,446 


6,464 


5,522 
29 


6,022 


17,994 


816,712 


OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 


106,770 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
Miscellaneous 


1,927 










2,672 


216 






1.371 










Total other assets 


1,927 
21,923 


2,672 
49,043 


245 
61,027 






108.141 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


15,982 


26,872 


5,595,028 




132,353 


96.862 


109,428 


40,739 


87,624 


13,165,165 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Accounts payable 


18,000 

486 

2,645 


6,218 

2,670 

650 








19,500 


3,350 
630 


706 
43 


9,458 

77 


2,010,001 


Other 


25,918 






Total liabilities 

RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


21,131 
21,923 


9,538 
49,043 


3,980 
61,027 


749 
15,982 


9,535 
26,872 


2,055,419 
5,595.028 
















Total reserves 


21,923 
7,000 


49.043 
6,111 


61,027 
8,500 


15,982 
11,933 

12,075 


26.872 
8,.R08 

42,409 


5,595,028 


CAPITAL 


384,209 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


82,299 


32,170 


35,921 


5,130.509 


Total capital 


89,299 


38,281 


44,421 


24,008 


51,217 


5,514.718 








132,353 


96,862 


109.428 


40.739 


87,624 


13,165,165 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


56,658 
218 


25,482 
79 


30,770 
287 


7.776 
281 


14,002 
592 


3,998,556 
41,743 






Total revenue 


56,876 


25.561 


31,057 


8.057 


14,594 


4,040,299 


EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


36,077 


18.187 


20,205 


4,461 


10,947 


2.925,189 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


7,064 
3,457 
1,834 
2,837 


1,574 

2,984 

589 

1.504 


4,582 
4,386 


1,015 
699 


1,111 
1,725 


244,417 
295,442 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 


3,509 


— depreciation 

— other 


2.136 


775 


1,336 


145,388 
















Total expense 


51,269 


24.838 


31,309 


6,950 


15,119 


3,613.945 






Net income or net expense 


5.607 


723 


252 


1,107 


525 


426,354 


Number of customers 


728 


290 


452 


129 


206 


26,140 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



217 



St. Clair 
Beach 

1,446 


St. George 
765 


St. Jacobs 
686 


St. Mary's 
4,515 


St. Thomas 
22,191 


Sandwich 

East Twp. 

21,954 


Sandwich 

West Twp. 

28.436 


Sarnia 
50,265 


Scarborough 
Twp. 
208,864 


$ 
102,358 
25,071 


$ 

52,489 
5,156 


$ 

55,855 
11,681 


$ 
537,454 
U5,957 


$ 
2,067,950 
607,I^56 


$ 
1,451,314 
352,919 


$ 
2,178,877 
JM,135 


$ 
5,265,682 
1,255,U51 


$ 

20,506,302 

2,7 U3, 91 9 


77,287 
15,064 


47,333 

332 

6,000 

614 


44,174 

764 
4,734 
1,549 


391,497 

61,900 

42,500 

2,531 


1,460,494 

10,456 

35,000 

125,647 


1,098,395 

144,649 
16,457 
38,496 


1,734,742 

117,428 
65,175 
64,740 


4,010,231 
58,095 


17,762,383 

1,146.292 
327 500 


933 


128,254 


407,497 


15,997 
14 


6,946 
65 


7,047 
10 


106,931 
18,859 


171,103 
43,051 


199,602 
42,060 


247,343 
29,121 


186,349 
159,908 


1,881,289 

150,232 
787,511 


194 








7,144 


45,126 


61,355 


47,780 


253,167 












208 
40,175 


65 
58,032 


10 
73,555 


18,859 
577,339 


50,195 
1,939,614 


87,186 
225,545 


90,476 
408,237 


207,688 
4,187,057 


1,190,910 
4,090,017 


133,667 


112,376 


124.786 


1.094,626 


3,621,406 


1,610,728 


2,480,798 


8,591,325 


24,924,599 


4,100 






38,873 

42 

6,863 


200,000 

193 

54,007 


881,000 

5,210 

.37,318 


1,063,000 

2,704 

99,257 


631,100 

37,023 

121,198 


9,919,251 


1,740 


30 

742 




636,651 


1,257 


100 


1,101,259 


7,097 
40,175 


772 
58,032 


100 
73,555 


45,778 
577,339 


254,200 
1,939,614 


923,528 
225,545 


1,164,961 

408,237 


789,321 

4,187,057 


11,657,161 
4,090,017 




















40,175 
13,789 


58,032 
6,000 


73,555 
6,000 


577,339 
151,334 


1,939,614 
138,944 


225,545 
161,101 


408,237 
232,500 


4,187,057 
655,291 


4,090,017 

2,044,302 
787,511 


72,606 


47,572 


45,131 


320,175 


1,288,648 


300,554 


675,100 


2,959,656 


6,345,608 


86,395 


53,572 


51,131 


471,509 


1,427,592 


461,655 


907,600 


3,614,947 


9.177,421 


133,667 


112,376 


124.786 


1,094.626 


3.621,406 


1.610.728 


2,480,798 


8.591.325 


24.924.599 



40,361 
191 


23,869 
458 


29,186 
221 


493,994 
5,584 


989,711 
8.207 


624,470 
7,701 


891,723 
11,525 


6,734,141 
50,647 


8,032,842 
260,775 


40,552 


24,327 


29,407 


499.578 


997,918 


632.171 


903,248 


6.784,788 


8,293,617 


24,651 


19,559 


22,646 


373,655 


576,920 


262,073 


468,818 


5,644,833 


5,293,015 


4,169 
5.258 
1,537 


1,560 
2,051 


974 
1,751 


21,486 

22,692 

5,421 

14,244 


164,236 

88,861 

1,417 

49,955 


106,531 

104,961 

85,210 

36,966 


137,789 
80,747 

108,000 
55,212 


422,089 

237,782 

65,021 

125,624 


471,000 
500,322 
895,564 


3.148 


1,268 


1,539 


470,038 




















38,763 


24,438 


26,910 


437,498 


881,389 


595,741 


850,566 


6. 495,. 349 


7.629,939 


1,789 


111 


2,497 


62,080 


116.529 


36,430 


52.682 


289,439 


663,678 


430 


287 


245 


1,675 


7,936 


6,247 


7,871 


15,669 


64,904 



218 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Municipality 


Seaforth 
2,192 


Shelburne 
1.295 


Simcoe 
8,625 


Smith's 
Falls 
9,209 


Smithville 
871 


t 
Southamp- 




ton 
1,769 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
250.844 
38,567 


$ 
124,747 
38,128 


$ 
77.3,211 
192,062 


$ 
812,743 
238,730 


$ 

74,253 
15,172 


$ 
195,849 




32,030 








212,277 

8,062 
9,000 
6,676 


86,619 

9,010 

10,000 

1,043 


581,149 

44,343 

24,268 

3,787 


574,013 

3,122 

20.000 

4.199 


59.081 

6,790 

3,000 

638 


163,819 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cssh on hand and in bank . . 


21,067 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 


5,000 
830 






Total current assets 


23,738 

563 

1,898 


20,053 
406 


72,398 
983 


27,321 
20,810 


10.428 
226 


26 897 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores . . 


2 081 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 




300 




215 














Total other assets 


2,461 
225,669 


706 
96,297 


983 
603,547 


21,025 
595,925 


226 
37,202 


2,081 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


103,682 




464.145 


203,675 


1.258.077 


1.218.284 


106.937 


296.479 


LIABILITIES 


23,800 

594 

4,219 






5,000 
1.583 
2,068 




5,441 




109 
181 


21 
11,441 


124 
373 




Other 


1,442 






Total liabilities 


28,613 
225,669 


290 
96,297 


11,462 
603,547 


8,651 
595,925 


497 
37,202 


6,883 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


103.682 
















Total reserves 


225,669 
50,640 


96.297 
16,991 


603,547 
75,435 


595,925 

142,787 


37,202 
1.5,000 


103,682 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Local sinking fund . 


37,082 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


159,223 


90,097 


567.633 


470,921 


54,238 


148,832 


Total capital 


209,863 


107,088 


643.068 


613,708 


69,238 


185,914 








464,145 


203.675 


1.258.077 


1,218.284 


106.937 


296.479 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 
Sales of electric energy 


95,500 

772 


51,148 
383 


408,904 
5,009 


351,196 
2,582 


41,441 
408 


84,841 


Other 


2,293 






Total revenue 


96,272 


51.531 


413,913 


353,778 


41,849 


87.134 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


57.562 


34.426 


288,899 


242,613 


24,357 


48,032 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


10,372 

11.062 

2.941 

5.760 


2.479 
5,068 


41,370 
22,965 


32,866 

35,813 

3,040 

22,505 


4,097 
5.784 


11,875 
6,189 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


1,516 


— depreciation 

— other 


3,822 


19,454 


1,913 


4,448 














Total expense 


87,697 


45.795 


372,688 


336,837 


36,151 


72,060 






Net income or net expense 


8.575 


5.736 


41,225 


16,941 


5.698 


15,074 


Number of customers 


891 


585 


3,207 


3,382 


374 


1.199 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



219 



Springfield 
517 


Stamford 
Twp. 
30,470 


Stayner 
1,658 


Stirling 
1,296 


Stoney 
Creek 
6,387 


Stouffville 
3,216 


Stratford 
20,536 


Strathroy 
5,110 


Streetsville 
5,180 


$ 

41,968 
n,769 


$ 
2,605,912 
If3i,809 


$ 
137,579 

25,239 


$ 
135,301 
.W,l 73 


$ 
379,759 
55,270 


$ 
241,491 

33,UI,lt 


$ 
2,431.013 
573,710 


$ 
512,888 
1GU,7U2 


S 
373,188 
56.562 


27,199 

4,449 
1,500 


2.171,103 

309.860 

8,000 

20,193 


112,340 

7,170 
1,000 
],448 


95,128 
13,192 


324,489 

13,789 
19,872 
2,342 


208,047 
19.976 


1,857,303 

39,138 

180,000 

33,897 


348,146 
10,483 


316,626 
20,506 


180 


990 


2,842 


36,388 


7,378 


6,129 


338,053 
34,284 


9,618 
415 


14,182 
1,542 


36,003 
36 


22,818 
358 


253,035 
73,305 


46,871 
1,389 


27,884 
581 








27.633 


715 




643 


2,038 


20,127 


2,007 


52 










61.917 
813,431 


1,130 
86,716 


1,542 
63,486 


679 

108,713 


2,396 
122,832 


93,432 
2.211,987 


3,.396 
387,695 


633 


34,019 


105,630 


67.117 


.?, 384.504 


209,804 


174,338 


469,884 


356.093 


4,415.757 


786.108 


450,773 




950,012 
72,275 
60,921 




5,561 

4 

1,039 


42,709 

578 

7,480 


63,545 

438 

10,892 


319.000 

8,761 

144,181 


85,600 
1,260 
6,546 


105 516 


9 
400 


3,622 
646 


890 
8,806 


409 
34.019 


1.083.208 
813.431 


4,268 
86,716 


6,604 
63,486 


50,767 
108,713 


74,875 
122,832 


471,942 
2,211,987 


93,406 
387,695 


115,212 

105,630 
1,027 




















34,019 

9.500 


813,431 
620,266 


86,716 
9,557 


63,486 
17,439 


108,713 
35,751 


122,832 
20,736 


2,211,987 
464,800 


387,695 
58.169 


106,657 

47,582 


23,419 


867,599 


109,263 


86,809 


274,653 


137,650 


1,267,028 


246,838 


181,322 


32,919 


1,437,865 


118.820 


104,248 


310,404 


158,386 


1,731,828 


305,007 


228.904 


67,347 


3.384.504 


209,804 


174,338 


469.884 


356.093 


4,415,757 


786.108 


450,773 



12.403 
194 


1,093.568 
12.054 


54,413 
871 


49,571 
750 


200,312 
3.265 


132,131 
1,677 


946,606 
29,454 


211.004 
775 


190,375 
1,937 


12,597 


1 110622 


55,284 


50.321 


203,577 


133.808 


976,060 


211,779 


192,312 


9,172 


621.412 


35,515 


31,856 


145,950 


86,141 


582,806 


130.161 


121,792 

1.548 


1,225 
1,072 


114.960 
93.094 

111.086 
64.414 


4,051 
3,957 


6,639 

5,817 

692 

3,515 


14.236 

23.439 

6.491 

9,133 


5,807 

11,765 

5.639 

5.427 


127,563 
88,126 
34,025 
56,357 


25.039 

22,988 

2,649 

12,996 


9,598 
11,678 
10,506 


1,160 


3,420 


9.522 




















12.629 


1,004,966 


46.943 


48.519 


199,249 


114.779 


888,877 


193,833 


164,644 


32 


105,656 


8,341 


1.802 


4,328 


19,029 


87,183 


17.946 


27,668 


182 


9,141 


676 


546 


2,006 


1.096 


6,967 


1,822 


1,504 



220 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 





Sunderland 
593 


Sundridge 
796 


Sutton 
1,301 


Swansea 
9,512 


Tara 
491 




Pnniilption . . 


1,220 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


$ 
50,660 
10.30 A 


$ 

71,666 
10,513 


$ 
146,311 
Al,800 


$ 
716.380 

182,035 


$ 

46,295 
10,93 U 


$ 
131,155 




5U,057 








40,356 

10,267 

2,000 

315 


61.153 

11,211 

12,864 

616 


104,511 

6,450 
7,000 
1,721 


534,345 
122,267 


35,361 

2,565 

8,000 

201 


77,098 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


16,637 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) • ■ 


10,000 


8,937 


772 






Total current assets 


12,582 


24,691 
605 


15,171 


131,204 
9,987 


10,766 


27,409 


OTHER ASSETS 


436 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 


49 








1.982 


3,358 


1,589 


129 








Total other assets 


49 

42,875 


2,587 
11,198 


3,358 
100,554 


11,576 
524,672 


129 
40,556 


436 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


174.705 




95.862 


99,629 


223,594 


1,201,797 


86.812 


279.648 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 




23,328 
3,106 

71 




60,688 

1,979 

17,230 




19,863 




5,086 
130 


1.201 
807 


6 

45 


812 


Other 


1,187 






Total liabilities 


5,216 

42,875 


26,505 
11,198 


2.008 
100,554 


79.897 
524,672 


51 
40,556 


21,862 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


174,705 
















Total reserves 


42,875 
4,628 


11,198 
11,671 


100,554 
26,000 


524.672 
188.142 


40,556 
14,264 


174,705 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


15,421 


Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


43,143 


50,255 


95,032 


409.086 


31,941 


67,660 


Total capital. . 


47,771 


61,926 


121,032 


597,228 


46,205 


83,081 








95,862 


99,629 


223,594 


1,201,797 


86,812 


279,648 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 
Sales of electric energy 


21,029 
253 


27,097 
794 


66,618 
454 


339,840 
19,017 


23,037 
338 


52,71b 


Other 


2.808 






Total revenue 


21,282 


27,891 


67,072 


358,857 


23,375 


55,523 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


13,312 


14,040 


44,518 


238,471 


17,665 


33,241 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


2,056 
1,718 

1,409 


1,699 
2,079 
2,809 
1,685 


4,788 
8,363 


61,693 
37.708 
13.757 
17,746 


1,248 
1,131 


5.223 
3,785 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 


2,260 


— depreciation 

— other 


4,406 


1,359 


3,344 
















Total expense 


18,495 


22,312 


62,075 


369,375 


21,403 


47.853 


Net income or net expense 


2,787 


5,579 


4.997 


10,518 


1,972 


7,670 


Number of customers 


262 


298 


894 


3,528 


233 


513 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



221 



Tecumseh 
4,462 


Teeswater 
884 


Thamesford 
1,074 


Thamesville 
1,041 


Thi'dford 
749 


Thorn bury 
1,141 


Thorndrile 
417 


Thorn Ion 
323 


$ 
245,671 
81,020 


$ 
97,056 

n,882 


$ 

82,122 

16.808 


$ 
106,382 
29,578 


$ 

61,797 

10,961 


$ 

156,886 
19,218 


$ 

34,867 

11,528 


S 

21,163 
9,230 


164,651 
13 934 


82,174 


65,314 
4.458 


76,804 

11,934 

6,849 

604 


50,836 


137,668 

2.138 
4.000 
6,048 


23,339 

5,356 

3,000 

371 


11.933 
2,292 




3,500 
688 


9,934 
616 


6,630 


901 


54f; 


20,564 
14,417 


4,188 


5,359 


19,387 

17 


10,550 
28 


12,186 
1,581 


8,727 


2,838 














250 


69 


27 


355 


286 




116 








14,417 


250 
62,026 


69 
74,383 


44 
81,791 


383 
47,583 


1,867 
27,599 




116 


138,652 


33,856 


14,361 


338.284 


148,638 


145,125 


178,026 


109,352 


179,320 


65,922 


29.248 






2,000 

28 

674 






20,977 
430 
295 






313 
2,215 


1.229 
69 


156 
1,110 


2,545 
504 


1,041 
6 


116 
97 


2.528 
138,652 


1,298 
62.026 


2,702 
74,383 


1,266 
81,791 


3,049 
47,583 


21,702 
27.599 


1,047 
33,856 


213 
14,361 


















138,652 
26,000 


62,026 
21,296 


74,383 
6,358 


81,791 
11.188 


47,583 
16,500 


27,599 
65,023 


33,856 
3,087 


14,361 
7,200 


171,104 


64.018 


61,682 


83,781 


42,220 


64.996 


27,932 


7,474 


197,104 


85,314 


68,040 


94,969 


58,720 


130,019 


31,019 


14,674 


338.284 


148.638 


145.125 


178.026 


109,352 


179.320 


65.922 


29.248 



102.831 
1,250 


36,880 
806 


44.846 

778 


45.162 
858 


23,857 
620 


60,506 
701 


14,011 
259 


7,231 






101,081 


37,686 


45,624 


46,020 


24.477 


61,207 


14,270 


7.231 


55,615 


28,757 


32.062 


31.658 


19,319 


34,965 


9.481 


4,594 


18,546 
13,498 


2.972 
2.467 


2.323 

2.915 

206 

2.225 


5.107 
4.719 


2,167 
2,305 


6,604 
4,762 
2,831 
3,528 


798 
1,840 


498 

464 


7,276 


2.476 


3,043 


1,630 


1,100 


772 


















94,935 


36.672 


39,731 


44,527 


25,421 


52,690 


13,219 


6,328 


9,146 


1,014 


5.893 


1.493 


944 


8,517 


1,051 


903 


1,341 


360 


387 


441 


329 


539 


136 


104 



222 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Municipality . 


Thorold 
8,602 


Tilbury 
3,086 


Tillsonburg 
6,605 


Toronto 
661,785 


Toronto 
Twp. 
63.175 


Tottenham 


Population 


752 








A. BALANCE SHEETS 

KIXKD ASSETS 


$ 
653,337 

119.822 


$ 
246,556 
83,010 


$ 
776,549 
125M8 


$ 
98,165,232 

26,iU,867 


$ 
7,053,585 

912,U6 


$ 
43,072 


Accumulated depreciation 


12,S68 






Net fixed assets 


533.515 

33,457 

2,305 


163,546 

14,633 
10,000 
3,003 


651,501 
30,685 


71,720,365 

97.464 
4,672,818 
4,252,948 


6,141,139 

99,059 

8,000 

354,631 


30,704 


currp:nt assets 


7,414 


Investment in government securities 


10,556 


2,815 


843 








35,762 
16,181 
3,812 


27,641 
417 


33,500 
20.104 


9,023.230 

2,454,415 
911,939 
577,570 


461,690 
148,078 


18,813 


OTHER assets 




Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 




793 


5.805 


43,074 


81 






Total other assets 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


19.993 
719,937 


1,210 
234,887 


25.909 
411.648 


3,943,924 
83,231,735 


191,152 
1,825,574 


81 

47.501 




1.309,207 


427,284 


1,122,558 


167,919.254 


8,619,555 


97,099 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding . . 


87.100 
19.195 
6.536 


37,000 

224 

5,042 


81,300 
11,908 
24,043 


13,368,050 

1,782,327 

908,552 


996,113 

81,622 

141,551 


1,603 


Accounts payable ... . . . . 




Other . . 


723 






Total liabilities. .. .... 


112,831 
719,937 


42,266 
234.887 


117,251 
411,648 


16.058,929 

83,231,735 
515,249 


1,219,286 
1,825,574 


2,326 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


47,501 














Total reserves 


719,937 
42,900 


234,887 
27,000 


411,648 
128,588 


83,746,984 

31,559,934 
911,939 

35,641,468 


1,825,574 
601,713 


47,501 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Local sinking fund 


19,832 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


433,539 


123,131 


465,071 


4,972.932 


27,440 


Total capital 


476,439 


150,131 


593,659 


68.113,341 


5.574,695 


47.272 




1,309,207 


427.284 


1.122.558 


167 919,254 


8,619,555 


97,099 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


585,280 
7,195 


98,696 

1,444 


307,053 
4,467 


38,384,770 
440,698 


3,355,500 
26,845 


22,797 
592 






Total revenue . . . 


592,475 


100,140 


311,520 


38,825,468 


3,382,345 


23,389 






expe:nse 

Power purchased 


466,105 


57,789 


187,553 


22,493,127 


2,115,011 


16,490 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration.. . 


47,078 

30,807 

9,395 

15,394 


10,704 

14,915 

4,699 

6,917 


43,028 
30,541 
15,021 
17,137 


5,177,256 
4,456,848 
1,195,616 
3,046,760 
52,971 


237,443 
229,508 
116,581 
155,763 


2,244 
1,616 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 

— depreciation 

— other . . 


838 
1,166 














Total expense 


568,779 


95,024 


293,280 


36,422,578 


2,854.306 


22,354 






.Net income or net expense 


23,696 


5,116 


18,240 


2,402,890 


528,039 


1,035 


Number of customers 


2,674 


1,042 


2,519 


210.321 


16,491 


273 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



223 



Trenton 
12.945 


Tweed 
1,818 


Uxbridge 
2,374 


Vankleek 
Hill 
1,723 


Victoria 

Harbour 

1,036 


Walkerton 
3,933 


WallacebufK 
7,957 


Wardsville 
331 


$ 
1,184,676 
338,570 


$ 
157,144 
25,803 


168,539 
A0,A52 


$ 
138,508 
28,875 


66,862 
12,268 


$ 

292,732 
J^6,685 


$ 

932,040 
282,3U 


$ 

23.401 
7,665 


846,106 
40,612 


131,341 


128,087 

12,442 

22,063 

1.935 


109.633 
10,418 


54.594 
2,664 


246,047 

23,923 

23,000 

2.840 


649,696 

93,086 
76,676 
38.428 


20,736 

1,912 

1,500 

253 


55,100 


15,000 
492 


25,582 


96 


1,333 


121,294 
41,297 


15,492 
222 


36.440 
2,767 


10,514 


3,997 
973 


49,763 
12,322 


208.190 
78.252 

7 


3,665 








100 


300 


1,100 


1,686 


148 


158 








41,397 


522 

79,214 


3,867 
120.374 


1.686 
14,659 


1,121 
30.833 


12,480 
186,357 


78,259 
1.016.242 




841,771 


19,271 


1.850,568 


226.569 


288,768 


136,492 


90,545 


494,647 


1,952.387 


43,672 








32,300 

469 

2.075 


8,800 
267 
195 








33,857 
14,477 


1,336 
604 


2,526 
2,042 


369 
2,894 


759 
8,399 


104 
215 


48.334 
841,771 


1,940 
79,214 


4.568 
120,374 


34.844 
14,659 


9,262 
30,833 


3,263 
186.357 


9,158 

1.016.242 
1.046 


319 
19,271 
















841,771 
164,587 


79,214 
19,000 


120,374 
15,364 


14,659 
13,700 


30,833 
10,079 


186,357 
56.749 


1.017,288 
71.537 

854,404 


19,271 
7.562 


795,876 


126,415 


148,462 


73.289 


40,371 


248.278 


16,520 


960,463 


145,415 


163,826 


86,989 


50,450 


305.027 


925,941 


24,082 


1 850,568 


226.569 


288.768 


136 492 


90.545 


494,647 


1,952,387 


43 672 



731,721 
9,414 


49,769 
2,222 


92,752 
1,103 


45,347 
1,189 


26,912 
46 


143,052 
2,759 


399,206 
7,336 


11.860 
276 


741,135 


51,991 


93,855 


46,536 


26,958 


145.811 


406,592 


12,136 


518,365 


41,914 


68,818 


23,440 


14,412 


96,860 


295,457 


7.515 


33,976 
50,160 


2,871 
6,027 


6.769 
7,989 


4,003 
5,079 
3,543 
3,884 


4,008 
2,210 
1,232 
1,865 


10,864 
17,862 


43,162 

45,471 


1.273 
637 


30,938 


4.232 


4,187 


6,723 


25,550 


858 
















633,439 


55,044 


87.763 


39,949 


23,727 


132.309 


409.640 


10.283 


107.696 


3,053 


6,092 


6.587 


3.231 


13, .502 


3.04S 


1 8.53 


4,249 


641 


912 


556 


503 


1,350 


2.748 


151 



224 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Continued 



Municipality . . . 


Warkworth 
537 


Wasaga 

Beach 

506 


Waterdown 
1.858 


Waterford 
2,234 


Waterloo 
21.665 


Watford 


Population 


1.234 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 


$ 
48,093 
9^03 


$ 
183,659 

56,191 


$ 
129.958 

32,920 


$ 
152.120 
36,113 


$ 
2.156,636 

U5G,027 


$ 
97,880 


Accumulated depreciation 


37,72h 




38,690 

237 

2,500 

80 


127,468 

15,389 

15,000 

3,396 


97.038 
12,657 


116.007 

4.908 
4,969 
1,889 


1.700.609 

4.521 

400 

22.778 


60,156 


CURRENT ASSETS 


15.144 


Investment in government securities 


13.139 


1.356 


1,499 








2.817 


33,785 
208 


14.013 


11.766 
114 


27,699 
53.189 


29.782 


OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 


685 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
^Miscellaneous 








2,925 






259 


249 












Total other as'^ets 




3,133 
20,685 




114 
132.432 


53.448 
1,338.208 


934 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 


23,145 


96.605 


121.422 




64,652 


185,071 


207,656 


260,319 


3,119,964 


212,294 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


7,237 

67 

222 


63.500 

416 

4,016 


8.000 


31,400 

16 

2.934 


469,500 

15,639 

110,657 






109 


Other 


567 


911 






Total liabilities 

RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


7,526 
23.145 


67,932 
20,685 


8.567 
96.605 


34,350 
132,432 


595.796 
1.338,208 


1,020 
121,422 
















Total reserves 


23,145 
7.536 


20.685 
46.500 


96,605 
14.632 


132,432 
10.723 


1.338.208 
380,126 


121.422 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Local sinking fund 


9.055 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


26,445 


49.954 


87,852 


82.814 


805.834 


80,797 


Total capital 


33.981 


96.454 


102,484 


93,537 


1.185.960 


89,852 








64,652 


185,071 


207,656 


260,319 


3,119,964 


212,294 



B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


13,935 
155 


60,559 
1,677 


63,887 
2 


69,378 
257 


967,051 
4,079 


71,316 
1,264 






Total revenue 


14,090 


62.236 


63,889 


69,635 


971,130 


72,580 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


10,582 


27,652 


39,044 


39.831 


627,796 


55,407 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


672 
1,408 

642 
1,385 


4,081 
8,537 
8,240 
4,831 


6,551 
5,750 

1,442 
3,838 


10,360 
5,325 
2.855 
3.974 


82,442 
56,788 
66,135 
53,456 


4,232 
8,250 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 

—depreciation 

— other. . . 




2,760 
















Total expense 


14,689 


53,341 


56,625 


62.345 


886,617 


70,649 






.Net income or net expense 


599 


8,895 


7,264 


7,290 


84,513 


1,931 


Number of customers 


238 


1,034 


593 


812 


6.640 


529 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



225 



Waubaushene 
1.400 


Welland 
35,963 


Wellesley 
644 


Wellington 
1,007 


Wesl Lome 
1.150 


Weston 
9,394 


Westport 
713 


Wheatley 
1,336 


$ 

54,144 

10,179 


$ 
3,113,162 
776,207 


$ 

54.451 
8,1^16 


$ 

76,011 

31,89U 


$ 
118.151 
37,589 


$ 
1,267,015 
27U13 


$ 

42,709 
5,721 


$ 

158,712 
31.983 


43,965 
1,399 


2,336.955 

225,009 
21,970 
22,687 


46,035 

3.102 

1.000 

14 


44,117 

1,135 

7,000 

324 


80.562 

12.740 

14.720 

1.604 


992,902 

41.559 

9.871 

23.682 


36.988 

1,631 
8,000 


126,729 
12,927 


1,076 


183 








2,475 
290 


269,666 
30,320 


4.116 
30 


8,459 
1,433 


29.064 
2.496 


75,112 

30,855 
32.001 
4.804 


9,631 


13,110 
108 










38,430 


1.800 




158 


15 


147 








290 
27,037 


68.750 
1,594.607 


1.830 
59.929 


1,433 
60,295 


2,654 
123,883 


67.660 
1.058,958 


15 
32.637 


255 
80,697 


73.767 


4,269,978 


111,910 


114,304 


236,163 


2,194,632 


79,271 


220.791 




1,459,500 
51,585 
42,451 


3.500 

1.800 

415 






168,713 

8,731 

26,652 




19,338 
447 




30 
918 


116 
190 


5 
285 


25 


1,485 


25 
27,037 


1,553,536 
1,594,607 


5.715 
59.929 


948 
60,295 


306 
123,883 


204,096 
1,058,958 


290 
32.637 


21,270 
80,697 
















27,037 
3,242 


1,594,607 
369,750 


59.929 
8.928 


60,295 
13,816 


123,883 
8,000 


1,058,958 

135,768 
32,001 

763,809 


32.637 
15,000 


80,697 
32.662 


43,463 


752,085 


37,338 


39,245 


103,974 


31.344 


86,162 


46,705 


1,121,835 


46,266 


53,061 


111,974 


931.578 


46.344 


118,824 


73,767 


4,269,978 


111,910 


114,304 


236,163 


2,194,632 


79.271 


220.791 


24,007 
169 


1,132,171 
17,095 


25.762 
41 


30,220 
660 


60,745 
4,190 


522,017 
23.362 


20.452 
625 


59,782 
188 


24.176 


1.149,266 


25,803 


30,880 


64,935 


545.379 


21 077 


59,970 


13,129 


753,811 


16,304 


25.000 


38,363 


332,420 


14.388 


36.006 


3,117 
2,372 


122,684 

109,996 

64.768 

66.862 


2.192 

1.905 

466 

1,393 


3,323 
3.402 


5.935 

7,372 


42,063 
66,914 
20,191 
28,570 


1.296 
3,366 


6.416 
4.328 
3.637 


1,502 


2.344 


3,164 


1,020 


4.165 


















20,120 


1,118,121 


22,260 


34,069 


54.834 


490,158 


20.070 


54,552 


4,056 


31.145 


3,543 


3J89 


10,101 


55,221 


1,007 


5.418 


447 


10.635 


287 


508 


439 


3,715 


301 1 


488 



226 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Southern Ontario System — Concluded 



Municipalitv 


Whitby 

12.895 

$ 
1,277.828 
1 75.086 


Wiarton 
2,039 


Williams- 
burg 

350 


Winchester 
1,381 


Windermere 
118 


Windsor 




114,970 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

I'lXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost . . . 


$ 
134,776 

28,512 


$ 

22,204 
7,800 


$ 
110,718 
27,661 


$ 
31.368 

7,53A 


$ 
12 640 761 


Accumulated depreciation 


Jt 268 1 01 






Net fixed assets 

CrRRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investment in government securities 


1,102,742 

28.673 
10.000 
20,504 


106,264 

5,916 

15,000 

794 


14,404 

693 

15,000 

72 


83,057 
23,029 


23.834 

7,809 

5,000 

127 


8,372,660 

160,833 
1,968,221 




3,040 


420,485 








59.177 

27,228 

145 


21.710 
1,214 


15,765 


26.069 


12,936 


2,!549,539 


OTHER ASSETS 
Inventory of stores 


246 594 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 
M i'^ce 1 1 a n eou s 










180 




1.800 




1 390 












27.373 
458,158 


1,394 
105,059 


27,890 


1,800 
105.689 




247,984 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems. . . . 


14,377 


12,500,184 




1,647,450 


234,427 


58,059 


216,615 


51,147 


23,670,367 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


264.000 

4,001 

96,250 












Accounts payable 


151 

172 


40 
403 




90 


256.813 


Other 


10 


179.840 








Total liabilities 


364,25,1 

458,158 


323 
105,059 


443 
27,890 


10 
105.689 


90 
14,377 


436,653 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


12.500,184 
250,637 
















Total reserves . . 


458,158 
137,190 

687,851 


105,059 

37,400 


27,890 
2,750 


105,689 
29.162 


14,377 
11,238 


12,750.821 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Local sinking fund . 


2,583,832 


Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds 


91.645 


26,976 


81,754 


25,442 


7,899,061 


Total capital 


825,041 


129.045 


29,726 


110,916 


36,680 


10,482.893 




1,647,450 


234.427 


58.059 


216,615 


51,147 


23,670,367 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 

Other 


582,337 
7,588 


79.938 
1.386 


10,234 
512 


65,931 
145 


8,372 
227 


4,494,476 
116,573 






Total revenue . . 


589.925 


81,324 


10,746 


66,076 


8,599 


4,611,049 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


371,633 


54.945 


9,319 


47,058 


5,277 


2,842,287 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


40,787 
67,730 
39,600 
27,172 


8,683 
6,769 


700 
1,103 


3,415 
5,014 


960 
630 


736,993 
423,248 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 

— depreciation 

— other 


9,290 


3,383 


713 


3,268 


963 


339,350 
















Total expense. . 


546,922 


73,780 


11,835 


58,755 


7.830 


4,351,168 






Net income or net expense 


43,003 


7,544 


1,089 


7,321 


769 


259,881 


Number of customers 


3,846 


793 


140 


574 


121 


37,305 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



227 



Wingham 
2,875 


Woodbridge 
2,325 


Woodstock 
20,303 


Woodville 
394 


Wyoming 
889 


York Twp. 
124,429 


Zurich 
718 


Total 

Sf)UTHERN 

Ontario 
System 


$ 
338,267 
132,150 


$ 
187,274 
A1.357 


$ 
2,303,601 
615,138 


$ 

37,704 
5,877 


$ 

61,803 

19,313 


$ 
7,740,964 
2,368,58U 


$ 

51,604 
8.15U 


$ 
434,374,368 
91^,861.3.l^0 


206,117 

15.791 
60,000 


145,917 

33,358 

24.600 

2,309 


1,688,463 

10.578 
67,000 
17,343 


31,827 
825 


42,490 

9,827 
9,173 
2,765 


5,372,380 

419,148 
554,000 
220,258 


43,450 
5,739 


339.513,023 

14,037,162 
14,015,604 
13,505,564 


59S 


622 


296 


76,389 

12.479 


60,267 


94,921 

1,071 


1,447 


21,765 
130 


1.193,406 
103.130 


6,035 

1,470 


41,558,330 

8,990,705 
3,261,509 
2,505,283 








277 




423 


500 




3,354 


5 








12,756 




1,494 
1,876,069 


500 
34,356 


130 
40,824 


108,484 
4.612,909 


1,475 
55,241 


14,757,497 
267,925,104 


210,772 


195,036 


506,034 


401,220 


3,660,947 


68,139 


105,209 


11,285,179 


106.201 


663,753.959 






33,133 
10,953 
28,940 










78 652 866 


997 


3,915 
3,185 




13 
187 


253,017 
478,602 


33 
230 


11.197,104 


3,355 


30 


7,319,307 


4,352 

210.772 


7,100 
195,036 


73.026 
1,876,069 


30 
34,356 


200 
40,824 


731,619 
4,612,909 


263 
55,241 


97,169,277 

267,925,104 
2,353,400 


















210,772 
81,155 


195,036 
23,835 


1,876,069 
396,070 


34,356 

5,248 


40,824 
9,700 


4,612,909 
489,375 


55,241 
5,592 


270,278,504 

81,353,934 
3,261,509 


209,755 


175,249 


1.315,782 


23,496 


54.485 


5,451,276 


45,105 


211,690,735 


290,910 


199,084 


1,711,852 


33,744 


64,185 


5,940,651 


50,697 


296,306.178 


506.034 


401,220 


3.660,947 


68.130 


105,209 


11,285.179 


106.201 


663.753 959 



124,314 
8,311 


110,950 
2,015 


992.628 
8,032 


15,545 
51 


25,436 
638 


3,553,519 
84,796 


29,181 
2 


192,146,597 
3,073,362 


132,625 


112,965 


1,000,660 


15,596 


26 074 


3.638.315 


29,183 


195.219.959 


89,614 
2,214 


81,630 


672,925 


6,273 


16,414 

2,533 
1,760 


2,368,635 


17,239 


124,806,780 
505,542 


10,157 
13,438 


4,323 
8,393 


111.176 
55.017 
17.988 
54,123 


2,010 
1,004 


325,130 
490,542 


1,674 
2,823 


18.412,323 

16,365,106 

7,773,031 


8,451 


5.279 


1.020 


1,894 


212,889 


1,413 


10,920,911 
81,734 


















123,874 


99,625 


911,229 


10.307 


22,601 


3397,196 


23.199 


178 865,427 


8.751 


13,340 


89,431 


5,289 


3.473 


241,119 


5,984 


16.354,532 


1,078 


780 


6,995 


200 


341 


41,066 


305 


1,342,641 



228 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Northern Ontario Properties 





Atikokan 
Twp. 
6.918 


Cache Bay 
896 


Capreol 
2.937 


Chapleau 
Twp. 
3,742 


Cochrane 
4,4,59 






2,680 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plcint and facilities at cost 


$ 
536.712 
93,003 


$ 

55,254 
12,198 


$ 
226.012 
38,730 


$ 
148,660 
10,315 


$ 
459.859 

93,3I^5 


$ 
121,864 
11,030 


Accumulated depreciation 




Net fixed assets 


443,709 

42,717 

50,000 

8,471 


43.056 

4.105 

13.813 

1.866 


187,282 
30.177 


138,345 
36,193 


366,514 

21,974 


110,834 
789 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank . . . 


Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 




654 


3,465 


1,863 


11.362 




Total current assets .... 


101,188 

1.491 

13,063 


19.784 
426 


30.831 


39.658 


23.837 
13.419 


12.151 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores .... 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . 








^Miscellaneous 


1.363 


4.764 


5,936 


10.900 


1 049 






Total other assets . . 


14,554 
83.266 


1.789 
2,025 


4.764 
6.350 


5,936 


24.319 
7,463 


1.049 
458 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems .... 








642,717 


66,654 


229,227 


183,939 


422,133 


124,492 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


333.000 

4.325 

56.346 


6,000 


_ 82,800 

561 

3,603 


91,000 


85.750 

6,050 

12,504 


41,500 


Accounts payable 


6,130 
7,544 


Other 


110 


3,862 






Total liabilities 


393.671 
83.266 


6,110 
2,025 


86,964 
6,350 


94,862 


104,304 
7,463 


55,174 


RESERVES 


458 


Other 




















Total reserves 


83.266 
67,000 


2,025 
20,530 


6,350 
39,200 




7,463 
59,250 


458 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


24,000 


8.500 


Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . 


98,780 


37,989 


96,713 


65,077 


251,116 


60.360 


Total capital 


165,780 


58,519 


135,913 


89,077 


310,366 


68.860 




642,717 


66,654 


229,227 


183,939 


422,133 


124,492 



B OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


250,166 
6,604 


29.570 
617 


119,139 
338 


155,077 

1 


179,884 
4,370 


64,827 


Other 


140 






Total revenue 


256,770 


30,187 


119,477 


155,078 


184,254 


64,967 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


167,794 


18,376 


68,306 


101,524 


86,800 


39,981 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration . . . 


16,794 
33,024 
33,172 
13,660 


1,245 
2,205 
2,324 
1,654 


8,643 

11,881 

8,290 

5,431 


10,578 
9,783 
9,448 
3,643 


23,065 
25,662 
1 1,900 
10,718 


4,526 
6 111 


Fixed charges— interest and principal 

—depreciation 

— other 


4,137 
2,854 
















Total expense. . 


264,444 


25,804 


102,551 


134,976 


158,145 


57 609 






Net income or net expense 


7,674 


4,383 


16,926 


20,102 


26,109 


7,358 


Number of customers 


1,803 


201 


995 


991 


1,320 


673 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



229 



Dryden 
6,147 


Espanola 
5,222 


Fort 

William 

44,871 


Hearst 
2.366 


Kapus- 

kasing 

6,794 


Larder 

Lake Twp. 

2,007 


Latchford 
483 


Massey 
1,328 


McGarry 
2,904 


Nipigon 
Twp. 
2,687 


565,091 

125,935 


$ 
284,856 

50,79 U 


$ 
4,314,201 
986,606 


$ 
231.148 

25,548 


$ 
426,495 
36,058 


$ 
68,674 
25,005 


$ 
34,322 
7,205 


$ 
88,562 
9,U23 


$ 
75,959 

18,751 

57,208 

11,725 

395 


$ 
180,670 
U1.710 


439,156 

27,123 

2,461 


234,062 
18,078 
18,470 


3.327.595 

200.794 
235.500 
116,894 


205.600 

40.000 
6.492 


390,437 
7,680 
3,464 


43,669 

13,608 

745 


27,117 
6,407 
2,044 


79,139 
5,208 
3,351 


138,960 

8,180 

22,872 

1,418 


29,589 
10.410 


36,548 
10,067 


553,188 

132,367 

11,594 


46.492 
9.710 


11,144 

15.643 

1.028 


14,353 


8,451 




8,559 

155 

2,571 


12,120 
15 


32.470 


3,534 


2,295 


11 




13,944 
76,537 


10,067 
1.544 


143,961 
4,900,692 


9.710 


16.671 
12,301 


2.295 
3,507 


11 
590 


2,726 
412 


15 
3,342 


100,984 


559.226 


282,221 


8.925.436 


261,802 


430,553 


63,824 


36,169 


90,836 


72,685 


272,414 


132,054 

2,181 

19,938 


141.500 
13,175 
8,743 


480,000 
106,397 
83,225 


52.700 

3.970 

10.694 


32,861 
12,255 
10.077 


4,500 
1,123 
6.035 


88 
385 


34,800 
1,141 
1,586 


13 
5,517 


238 
2.295 


154,223 
76,537 


163,418 
1,544 


669,622 
4,900,692 


67,364 


55.193 
12,301 


11.658 
3,507 


473 
590 


37,527 
412 


5,530 
3,342 


2,533 
100,984 


76,537 
69,376 

259,090 


1.544 
3,500 

113.759 


4,900,692 
584.209 

2,770,913 


87.300 
107.138 


12,301 
57,618 

305,441 


3,507 
13,500 

35,159 


590 
18,901 

16,205 


412 
10,200 

42,697 


3,342 
13,782 

50,031 


100,984 
10,000 

158,897 


328,466 


117.259 


3,355,122 


194,438 


363,059 


48,659 


35,106 


52,897 


63.813 


168,897 


559,226 


282 221 


8.925 436 


261.802 


430,553 


63 824 


36 169 


90,836 


72,685 


272 414 



222,033 


168.983 


1,747,195 


96,524 


215,844 


55,265 


13,264 


44,155 


55,882 


79,343 


7,551 


1.618 


52,009 


2,110 


3,563 


119 


119 


111 


68 


2,607 


229 584 


170,601 


1.799,204 


98,634 


219,407 


55 384 


13,383 


44.266 


55.950 


81,950 


127,002 


92,927 


1,118,961 


72,025 


131,649 


38,393 


9,130 


21.821 


35.693 


53.916 


36,997 


10,686 


191,803 


6,371 


15,531 


3,236 


752 


4.221 


1.284 


10.510 


29,509 


21.338 


141,898 


10,148 


30,640 


5,861 


1,073 


9.279 


8,195 


8.636 


14,085 


12.933 


53,737 


8,636 


6,487 


1,608 




3.890 


1,200 




14,029 


7,211 


100,488 


4,311 


8,817 


2,305 


991 


2.171 


2,261 


4.405 


221,622 


145,095 


1,606,887 


101,491 


193,124 


51 ,403 


11,946 


41,382 


48.633 


77,467 


7.962 


25,506 


192,317 


2,857 


26.283 


3,981 


1 437 


2.884 


7317 


4.483 


1.790 


1,341 


13,973 


713 


2,189 


572 


145 


364 


490 


741 



230 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Northern Ontario Properties- 



Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 

Concluded 



Municipahty 


North 
Bay 

23,361 


Port 
Arthur 

43,384 


Rainy 
River 

1.140 


Red Rock 

1.772 


Schreiber 
Twp. 

2,210 


Sioux 




Lookout 
2,692 






A. BALANCE SHEETS 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant anrl farilitips at rost . . 


$ 
1,884,594 


$ 
5,087,770 
1,689,0U 


$ 
88,296 

U6,301 


$ 
104,676 

25,157 


$ 
150,917 
31,300 


$ 
229 288 


Amimnlatpd rienrpriation . . 


39 803 






Net fixed assets .... 


1,418,166 
100,861 
30,112 


3,398.726 

449,566 

99,208 

178,590 


41,995 

13,233 

14,730 

3,100 


79,519 

9,856 

10,398 

699 


119.617 

8.299 

24.927 

1.455 


189 485 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investment in government securities 
Accounts receivable (Net) 


11,966 
5,000 
8 725 






Total current assets 


130,973 

34,689 

8,255 


727,364 
205.648 


31,063 
1,349 


20.953 
1,738 


34.681 


25 691 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventory of stores 


7.455 


Sinking fund on local debentures . . . 






2,522 




1,833 




43 










Total other assets 


42,944 
50,066 


208,170 
8.868,527 


1,349 


3.571 
38.476 




7.498 


Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems 


49.074 










1,642,149 


13,202,787 


74,407 


142,519 


203,372 


222,674 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


403,000 

2,619 

79,959 


• 


4,000 

18 

260 


11,440 
349 
160 






Accounts payable . . . 


426,194 


168 


715 


Other 


5,429 










Total liabilities 


485,578 

50,066 
1,072 


426.194 

8.868,527 
100,000 


4,278 


11,949 
38,476 


168 
49,074 


6,144 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems . . 
Other 


















Total reserves 


51,138 
329,158 


8,968,527 
626,317 




38,476 
19,760 


49.074 
50.000 




CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


22,087 




Local sinking fund 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds. 


776,275 


3,181,749 


48,042 


72,334 


104.130 


216,530 


Total capital 


1,105,433 


3,808,066 


70,129 


92,094 


154.130 


216.530 








1,642,149 


13,202.787 


74,407 


142.519 


203,372 


222,674 


B. OPERATING STATEMENTS 

REVENUE 

Sales of electric energy 


952,392 
8,945 


1,831,495 
29,215 


58,239 
354 


39,150 

725 


58,425 
1.505 


135,930 


Other 


936 






Total revenue 


961,337 


1,860,710 


58,593 


39,875 


59,930 


136,866 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


529,086 

102,887 

116,412 

36,280 

47,198 


1,261,005 

24,413 

190,737 

138,588 

2,667 

129,221 


29,249 


26.799 


38,723 


84.850 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration. 


10,713 
8,248 
4,220 
2,968 


2.452 
3.977 
2.141 
2.913 


5,341 
7,991 


18.067 
16,731 


Fixed charges — interest and principal 




— depreciation 

— other ... 


3,915 


5.796 
















Total expense 


831,863 


1,746,631 


55,398 


38,282 


55,970 


125,444 






Net income or net expense 


129,474 


114,079 


3,195 


1,593 


3,960 


11,422 


Number of customers 


7,685 


14,061 


452 


340 


675 


949 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1961 



231 



South 
River 

1,032 


Sturgeon 
Falls 

6,328 


Sudbury 
79,281 


Terrace 
Bay 
Twp. 
1,922 


Thessalon 
1,788 


Webbwood 
560 


West Ferris 
Twp. 

5,428 


Total 

Northern 

Ontario 

Properties 


Total 
All Systems 


$ 
123,004 
39,50U 


$ 
375,508 

62,701, 


$ 
6,178,339 

1,169,727 


$ 
218,969 

1,7,609 


$ 
126,500 
27,571 


$ 

40,117 
J,,076 


$ 
591.938 
69,029 


$ 

23,018,255 

5,303.909 


$ 
457,392,623 
100,165,21,9 


83,500 
4,599 


312,804 
30,273 


5,008,612 

1,375 

75,100 

239,084 


171,360 


98,929 
8,786 


36,041 
5.633 


522,909 
19,355 


17,714,346 

1,068,292 
656,548 
685,389 


357,227,374 

15,105,454 
14,672,152 




65,000 
536 


1,509 


1.899 


1,090 


4,902 


14,190.953 


6,108 


30,273 
4,905 


315,559 
153,677 


65,536 


10,685 


6,723 


24,257 
21.287 


2,410,229 
599,754 


43,968,559 
9 590 459 










3 261 509 


13,362 


14,317 





3,456 


1,623 


9.995 


138,211 


2 643 494 








13,362 


4,905 
8,535 


167,994 
34,228 




3,456 
2,666 


1,623 
116 


31.282 
1,694 


737,965 
14,330,757 


15,495,462 
282,255,861 




77,904 


102,970 


356,517 


5,526,393 


314,800 


115,736 


44,503 


580,142 


35,193,297 


698,947.256 


90,000 

1,782 

10,829 


109,000 
36,199 
18,267 


557,000 
764,765 
156,992 


35,100 
4,658 


51,500 
2,012 
1,605 


23,154 

25 

313 


356,550 

589 

35,311 


3,159,209 

1,397,740 

541,639 


81,812,075 

12.594.844 

7 860 946 








102,611 


163,466 
8,535 


1,478,757 

34,228 
14,165 


39,758 
77,904 


55,117 
2,666 


23,492 
116 


392,450 
1,694 


5,098,588 

14,330,757 
115,237 


102.267.865 

282.255.861 
2.468,637 
















8,535 
26,000 

158,516 


48,393 
933,840 


77.904 
42,900 


2,6o6 
13,500 


116 
6,845 


1,694 
60,950 


14.445.994 
3,218,223 


284,724,498 

84.572,157 
3,261,509 


359 


3.065,403 


154,238 


44,453 


14,050 


125,048 


12,430,492 


224,121,227 


359 


184.516 


3,999,243 


197,138 


57,953 


20,895 


185,998 


15,648,715 


311,954,893 


102.970 


.^56,517 


5,526.393 


314,800 


115.736 


44.503 


580,142 


35.193,297 


698.947.256 



9 Months' 

Operation 

26,879 


158,487 
330 


2,602,347 
65,969 


58,350 
4,622 


62,580 
132 


18,639 


244,748 
6,074 


9,744,812 
200,752 


201,891,409 
3.274,114 








26,879 


158,817 


2,668,316 


62,972 


62,712 


18.639 


250,822 


9,945,564 


205,165,523 


14,110 


91,393 

19,744 

24.999 

10.593 

8,767 


1,563,790 


45,115 


28,407 


6,462 


147,133 


6,050,420 
24,413 

1,074,205 
977,202 
430,741 
545,781 


130,857,200 
529,955 


1,348 
3,476 
5,268 
2,318 


342,278 
242,669 
148,477 
135,003 


4,863 
5.975 
5.376 
5,442 


4,919 

12,256 

4,942 

3,387 


2,098 
3,154 
2,620 
1,040 


22,517 
37,482 
36,310 
12,864 


19,486,528 

17,342,308 

8,203,772 

11,466,692 

81,734 


















26,520 


155,496 


2,432,217 


66,771 


53,911 


15,374 


256,306 


9,102,762 


187,968.189 


359 


3,321 


236,099 


3,799 


8.801 


3.265 


5,484 


842,802 


17,197.334 


^30 


1,650 


23,290 


438 


519 


149 


1,947 


80,786 


1,423,427 



232 Municipal Electrical Service 



INTRODUCTION TO STATEMENT "C ' AND STATEMENT "D" 



STATEMENT "C" 

Statement "C" is the schedule of resale rates for residential, commercial, and 
industrial power service in the municipal distribution systems receiving power from 
the Commission. From time to time as revision becomes necessary, these rates are 
adjusted to more up-to-date rate structures. 



Description of Classes of Service 

Residential rates are applicable to all electrical service for household purposes, 
with the exception of house heating and flat-rate water-heaters. Charges for normal 
residential service are based on specified blocks of kilowatt-hours per month with 
suitable rates for each block. The account is subject to a minimum monthly charge 
and to a prompt payment discount of 10 per cent. For comparative purposes, net 
monthly bills are shown for metered energy consumptions of 100, 300, and 500 
kilowatt-hours per month. 

The water-heater rates shown in Statement "C" are for unmetered flat-rate 
service which is billed at a monthly rate per 100 watts of heater capacity. In many 
municipalities the flat-rate water-heater load is subject to peak-load control by the 
utility. The customer, of course, has the option of paying for water heating at reg- 
ular rates through the regular metered service. House-heating rates quoted are for 
separately metered consumption where an area greater than 25 per cent of the total 
is heated by electricity. 

Commercial rates are applicable to all electrical service supplied to stores, 
offices, churches, schools, public buildings, institutions, hospitals, hotels, restau- 
rants, service stations, and other premises used for commercial purposes. The com- 
mercial rates are also used for billing sign and display lighting. In most municipali- 
ties on the new rate structures, commercial-type customers having connected loads 
of less than five kilowatts are billed at residential rates. Rates for industrial power 
service to customers of the municipal systems provide for 24-hour unrestricted 
delivery at secondary distribution voltage. These rates, however, are not applicable 
to the Commission's direct industrial customers. 

Commercial and industrial power service accounts consist of a monthly demand 
rate (with a minimum for commercial service) applied to the customer's billing 
demand, plus energy charges for specified blocks of kilowatt-hours used, the size 
of the blocks varying in accordance with the customer's billing demand. All addi- 
tional energy is billed at the end rate per kilowatt-hour. Under the new rate struc- 
tures the two specified blocks for industrial power service are twice as large as those 
under the former structures. The accounts are subject to a prompt payment discount 



Introduction to Statements C and I) 233 

of 10 per cent. Industrial power service customers providing their own step-down 
transformation are granted, on the basis of their bilHng demand, an allowance of 
27(^ per kilowatt per month gross for service at subtransmission voltage and IVf per 
kilowatt per month gross for service at primary distribution voltage. The net monthly 
bills shown for commercial and industrial power service are calculated on the basis 
of a demand of one kilowatt for a use per month of 100, 200, and 300 hours. The 
corresponding bill for a demand of 10 kilowatts would be ten times the amounts 
shown, for 20 kilowatts twenty times the amounts shown, and so on. 



STATEMENT "D" 

Statement "D" records revenue, consumption, number of customers, average 
consumption per customer, and average cost per kilowatt-hour for each of the three 
main classes of service in all the municipal systems served. The revenue and con- 
sumption from house heating and the use of flat-rate water-heaters are included in 
the totals shown, the flat-rate water-heater kilowatt-hours being estimated on the 
basis of 16.8 hours' use per day. 

When a municipal utility adopts the new rate structures, a substantial number 
of commercial service customers having small connected loads (under 5 kilowatts) 
may be transferred to residential service billing, and certain small industrial power 
service customers may be reclassified under commercial service. In order to correct 
distortions in the calculation of average consumption per customer that would result 
from these changes, estimated averages are substituted for the arithmetic averages 
in the year the changes are made. 

The average cost per kilowatt-hour is the average cost to the customer, that is 
the average revenue per kilowatt-hour received by the utility. Such a statistical 
average does not represent the utility's actual cost of delivering one kilowatt-hour. 
However, a comparison of this average over a number of years is some indication 
of the trend of cost in any one municipality, and the trend in all municipal systems 
combined may be seen in the table on page 176 and the graphs on page 177. Other 
things being equal, the average cost per kilowatt-hour would rise with an increase 
in rates. The normal trend, however, is for consumption per customer to increase, 
and residential customers in particular are using an ever-widening variety of elec- 
trical appliances, including flat-rate water-heaters. This increased use, since it is 
billed at the low rates usually applicable to higher-consumption blocks of kilowatt- 
hours, is frequently reflected in a lower average cost per kilowatt-hour. 

For industrial power service customers, the relationship between demand 
(kilowatts required) and energy (kilowatt-hours of use) is an important factor in 
establishing the customer's average cost per kilowatt-hour. The use of the demand 
for only a few hours will result in a relatively small total bill but a high average cost 
per kilowatt-hour; the use of the same demand for several hours will increase the 
total bill but substantially reduce the average cost per kilowatt-hour. In other words, 
the average cost per kilowatt-hour varies inversely with the customer's load factor. 



234 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 






Residential service 



^•^ 



Rate per kwh 
for 



o 











c^ 


LO 






XJ2 


xos 


^1 


^1 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Acton ..... 
Ailsa Craig 

Ajax 

Alexandria . 
Alfred 



Alliston 

Almonte 

Alvinston 

Amherstburg 

Ancaster Twp. (including 
Ancaster) 



Apple Hill. 

Arkona 

Arnprior. . 
Arthur. . . . 
Athens . . . . 



Atikokan. . 
Aurora . . . . 
Avonmore . 
Aylmer. . . . 
Ayr 



Baden 

tBala 

Bancroft. . . 

Barrie 

Barry's Bay 



Bath 

Beachburg. 
Beachville. 
Beamsville. 
tBeardmore . 



Beaverton. . 

Beeton 

Belle River . 
Belleville. . . 
Blenheim. . . 



tBlind River. 
Bloomfield . . 

BJyth 

Bobcaygeon . 
Bolton 



i No. 


i 


No. 


^ 


i 


i 


^ 


$ 


$ 


41 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


4.45 


45 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.8 


1.1 


1.75 


3.87 


37 


1.5 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


1.0 


1.4 


2.29 


5.04 


40 


1.5 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 


42 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


0.9 


1.3 


2.16 


4.72 


40 


1.5 


60 


3.1 






1.0 


2.03 


3.83 


35 


1.5 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 


45 


1.5 


60 


3.5 






1.0 


2.25 


4.05 


38 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


4.41 


43 


1.5 


60 


4.2 






1.2 


2.70 


4.86 


56 




60 


4.0 






1.0 


2.52 


4.32 


43 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


1.0 


1.4 


2.16 


4.77 


37 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 




0.8 


1.75 


3.87 


42 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


40 


1.67 


50 


2.0 


1.0 


0.7 


1.0 


1.35 


3.01 


40 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


1.0 


1.4 


2.16 


4.77 


37 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


4.41 


40 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.1 


1.6 


2.70 


5.89 


36 


1.5 


50 


2.2 


1.1 


0.7 


1.0 


1.48 


3.28 


44 


1.5 


60 


2.9 






1.0 


1.93 


3.73 


40 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


41 


1.5 


50 


4.4 


2.2 


1.2 


1.6 


2.97 


6.48 


53 


1.5 


60 


3.5 






1.3 


2.36 


4.70 


40 


1.5 


60 


2.4 






1.0 


1.66 


3.46 


42 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.7 


1.0 


1.75 


3.82 


39 


1.5 


60 


3.5 






1.2 


2.32 


4.48 


39 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.1 


1.6 


2.70 


5.89 


42 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


41 


1.5 


60 


2.7 




.... 


1.2 


1.89 


4.05 


45 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.2 


1.6 


2.70 


5.94 


40 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.7 


1.0 


1.75 


3.82 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


0.9 


1.3 


2.16 


4.72 


42 


1.5 


,50 


3.6 


1.8 


1.1 


1.5 


2.43 


5.35 


35 


1.5 


50 


2.0 






1.0 


1.35 


3.15 


44 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 




0.9 


2.02 


4.45 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.8 


1.9 


1.1 


1.5 


2.56 


5.62 


42 


1 5 


50 
50 
60 
50 


2.6 
2.8 
3.4 
3.6 


1.3 
1.4 


0.8 
0.8 


1 1 


1 75 


3 87 


45 


1.5 
1 5 


1.1 
1 2 


1.89 

2 27 


4 14 


40 


4 43 


45 


1.5 


1.8 


1.1 


1.5 


2.43 


5.35 



fLocal system 
For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



235 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Indi:stri.\l power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 
























5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 


I- 

1 




Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use of 

1 kw of dem 


bill 


Energy rate per 

kwh for use of 

each kw of demand 


and 






2 


8 


{ 


i 


i2 

3 


to 

£2 


£2 

ll 


i 


52 


8 


1 


{ 


^ 


p 


e 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 





^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.6 




1.0 


2.79 


3.69 


4.59 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.1 




0.5 


0.33 


1.89 


2.34 


2.64 


3.0 




0.9 


3.15 


3.96 


4.77 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


3.6 




1.0 


3.69 


4.59 


5.49 


1.35 


2.9 




1.9 




0.33 


3.37 


3.67 


3.97 


3.5 




1.0 


3.60 


4.50 


5.40 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°1.5 


0.8 


0.5 


1.80 


2.52 


2.97 


1.00 




1.0 


.... 


0.5 


0.33 


1.80 


2.25 


2.55 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


2.4 




0.9 


2.61 


3.42 


4.23 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


4.2 


0.8 


0.5 


4.23 


4.95 


5.40 


1.00 




2.7 




0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.78 


4.08 


3.0 




1.2 


3.15 


4.23 


5.31 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


2.0 




0.8 


2.25 


2.97 


3.69 


1.00 


1.4 




0.9 




0.25 


1.93 


2.16 


2.38 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


3.0 




1.2 


3.15 


4.23 


5.31 


1.35 


3.5 




2.3 




0.33 


3.82 


4.12 


4.42 


°3.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.96 


4.41 


1.00 




2.6 




0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.69 


3.99 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


2.3 




1.1 


2.52 


3.51 


4.50 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 




2.9 




0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.96 


4.26 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.07 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 




1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 




2.7 




0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.78 


4.08 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.9 




1.0 


3.06 


3.96 


4.86 


1.35 


.2.3 




1.5 




0.33 


2.92 


3.22 


3.52 


"•^O 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 



236 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 






Residential service 



a 

a 

11 



Rate per kwh 
for 



X2 J= 



XJ3 
a; > 



zJ 



^•2 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Bothwell .... 
Bowmanville . 
Bracebridge . . 
Bradford .... 
Braeside 



Brampton 

Brantford 

i§BrantfordTwp. 

Brechin 

Bridgeport 



Brigden . . . 
Brighton. . 
Brockville . 
Brussels . . . 
Burford . . . 



Burgessville . 
Burk's Falls . 
§Burlington. . 
Cache Bay . , 
Caledonia . . 



Campbellford . 
Campbellville. 
Cannington. . . 

Capreol 

Cardinal 



Carleton Place . 

Casselman 

Cayuga 

Chalk River . . . 
Chapleau Twp. 



Chatham. . . 
Chatsworth . 
Chesley .... 
Chesterville. 
Chippawa . . 



Clifford . 
Clinton . 
tCobalt.. 
Cobden . 
Cobourg. 



40 



No. 
45 
35 
39 

36 

37 
41 
42 
40 
40 



48 



42 



46 



40 



45 



41 



1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 

1.5 



1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 



No. 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
60 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

60 
50 
50 
50 
60 

50 
60 
60 
60 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
60 

60 
50 
60 
50 
60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



2.6 
2.4 
3.0 
2.8 
2.6 

3.2 
2.2 
4.0 
2.2 
3.0 

2.6 
2.6 
2.0 
3.2 
3.0 

4.0 
3.4 
4.0 
3.6 

2.4 

2.6 
3.0 
3.2 
3.5 
2.6 

3.2 
3.4 
2.8 
2.6 
9.0 

3.8 
2.8 
2.7 
2.6 
3.1 

3.0 
3.0 
4.0 
2.0 
2.6 



1.3 
1.2 

1.4 
1.3 

1.6 

2.0 
1.1 
1.5 

1.3 
1.3 

1.6 
1.5 



1.7 
2.0 
1.8 



1.3 



1.3 

1.6 
1.7 
1.4 
1.3 



1.4 
1.3 



1.5 
1.5 
2.0 
1.0 
1.3 



0.7 
0.8 

1.0 

1.2 
0.7 
0.9 

0.7 
0.7 

0.9 
0.9 



1.0 
1.2 
1.1 



0.7 



0.8 
1.0 



0.8 



0.9 
0.9 
1.1 
0.7 
0.8 



1.0 
1.0 
1.2 
1.1 
1.1 

1.4 
1.2 
1.6 
1.0 
1.2 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.3 
1.2 

1.0 
1.4 
1.6 
1.5 
1.2 

1.0 
1.3 
1.0 
1.3 
1.1 

1.4 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
4.0 

1.4 
1.1 
1.0 
0.8 
1.4 

1.2 
1.2 
1.6 
1.0 
1.1 



1.75 
1.62 
2.05 
1.89 
1.75 

2.16 
1.62 
2.70 
1.48 
2.02 

1.75 
1.75 
1.44 
2.16 
2.02 

2.52 
2.29 
2.70 
2.43 
1.73 

1.75 
2.09 
2.09 
2.36 
1.75 

2.16 
2.29 
1.89 
1.75 
6.30 

2.56 
1.89 
1.82 

1.75 
2.18 

2.02 
2.02 
2.70 
1.35 
1.75 



3.96 
3.55 

4.21 
4.14 
4.00 

4.77 
3.78 
5.94 
3.28 
4.45 

3.82 
3.82 
3.24 

4.72 
4.45 

4.32 
5.04 
5.94 
5.35 
3.89 

3.82 
4.43 
3.89 
4.70 
3.87 

4.77 
5.04 
4.14 
3.87 
13.50 

5.08 
4.14 
3.62 
3.87 
4.70 

4.45 
4.45 
5.89 
3.01 
3.87 



+ Local system 
For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



237 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prom pi payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 






Industrl\l power service 






Demand rate 
per 100 watts 
























5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 


& 

^ 

t 




Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use of 

1 kw of dem 


bill 


Energy rate per 


ind 


kwh for use of 
each kw of demand 








E 
















1 

li 


i 
11 


£2 


8 


8 


g 


^1 




Is 


2 

B 

li 


§•2 


§ 

8 


X. 


i 


i 


c 


e 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


^ 


i 


i 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°1.7 


0.8 


0.5 


1.98 


2.70 


3.15 


1.00 




1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 


2.0 




1.0 


2.25 


3.15 


4.05 


1.20 


1.4 




0.9 




0.30 


2.11 


2.38 


2.65 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


1.8 




0.7 


2.07 


2.70 


3.33 


1.20 


1.4 




0.9 




0.30 


2.11 


2.38 


2.65 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°1.7 


0.8 


0.5 


1.98 


2.70 


3.15 


1.00 




1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


1.7 




0.8 


1.98 


2.70 


3.42 


1.20 


1.4 




0.9 




0.30 


2.11 


2.38 


2.65 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


3.5 




0.8 


3.60 


4.32 


5.04 


1.35 


2.9 




1.9 




0.33 


3.37 


3.67 


3.97 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°3.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.32 


4.77 


1.00 




3.0 




0.5 


0.33 


3.60 


4.05 


4.35 


1.9 




1.1 


2.16 


3.15 


4.14 


1.35 


2.3 




1.5 




0.33 


2.92 


3.22 


3.52 


°1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


1.89 


2.61 


3.06 


1.00 




1.1 




0.5 


0.33 


1.89 


2.34 


2.64 


2.8 




1.1 


2.97 


3.96 


4.95 


1.35 


3.5 




2.3 




0.33 


3.82 


4.12 


4.42 


2.8 




0.9 


2.97 


3.78 


4.59 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


3.0 




1.1 


3.15 


4.14 


5.13 


1.35 


2.9 




1.9 




0.33 


3.37 


3.67 


3.97 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


8.5 




4.0 


8.10 


11.70 


15.30 


1.35 


5.7 




3.8 




2.00 


5.49 


7.29 


9.09 


3.3 




1.2 


3.42 


4.50 


5.58 


1.35 


2.0 




1.3 




0.40 


2.70 


3.00 


3.29 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.3 




1.0 


2.52 


3.42 


4.32 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


2.6 




1.3 


2.79 


3.96 


5.13 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.25 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 


..■. 


1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 



238 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



Residential service 



-I 

S 

3 



Rate per kwh 
for 



Si 
So 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Cochrane. . . 
Col borne . 
Coldwater. . 
Collingwood 
Comber . 

Coniston . 
Cooks town 
Cottam . . 
Courtrighl 
Creemore 

Dashwood 
Deep River . 
Delaware . . . 

Delhi 

Deseronto . 

Dorchester 
Drayton 
Dresden 
Drumbo. 
Dryden . . 



Dublin. . 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

Dutton 

Elast York Twp. . . 

Eganvill- 

tP21k Lake Townsite 
Elmira 

Kim vale 
Elm wood 
Elora . . 
Embro 

tEnKlehart 



Erica u ... 
Erie Beach. 

Erin 

Espanola 
Essex . . 



43 



No. 

35 

40 
41 

45 

42 
45 

45 



45 



47 



1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 



1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 



No. 
60 
60 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
60 
50 
60 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
60 
60 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



i 


|4 


3.4 




3.8 




2.6 


1.3 


2.4 


1.2 


3.0 


1.5 


3.2 


1.6 


2.6 


1.3 


2.8 


1.4 


2.8 


1.4 


3.1 




3.6 


1.8 


3.4 


1.7 


3.8 




2.6 


1.3 


2.6 


1.3 


2.8 


1.4 


3.4 


1.7 


3.0 


1.5 


2.8 


1.4 


3.8 


1.9 


2.8 


1.4 


2.8 


1.4 


2.8 




2.8 


1.4 


2.7 




2.8 


1.4 


2.6 


1.3 


4.3 




3.6 


1.8 


3.0 


1.5 


2.6 


1.3 


2.6 


1.3 


3.2 




3.3 




4.0 


2.0 


2.8 


1.4 


4.0 


2.0 


3.0 


1.5 


3.8 


1.9 


3.0 


1.5 



0.7 
0.7 
0.9 

1.0 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 



1.1 



0.8 
0.7 

0.8 
1.0 
0.9 
0.8 
1.1 

0.8 
0.8 



0.8 
0.8 



l.l 
0.8 



0.8 
0.7 



0.8 
1.1 
0.8 



i 

1.5 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.2 

1.4 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 

1.5 
0.9 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 

1.1 
1.4 
1.2 
1.1 
1.5 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
0.9 
1.1 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.5 
1.2 

1.1 
1.0 
1.4 
1.1 
1.6 

0.8 
1.1 
1.2 
1.5 
1.2 



$ 


$ 


2.38 


5.08 


2.41 


4.21 


1.75 


3.82 


1.62 


3.55 


2.02 


4.45 


2.16 


4.77 


1.75 


3.87 


1.89 


4.14 


1.89 


4.14 


1.84 


3.64 


2.43 


5.35 


2.29 


4.99 


2.56 


5.08 


1.75 


3.87 


1.75 


3.82 


1.89 


4.14 


2.29 


5.04 


2.02 


4.45 


1.89 


4.14 


2.56 


5.62 


1.89 


4.14 


1.89 


4.14 


1.91 


3.89 


1.89 


4.18 


1.85 


3.83 


1.89 


4.14 


1.75 


3.87 


2.72 


4.70 


2.43 


5.35 


2.02 


4.41 


1.75 


3.87 


1.75 


3.82 


2.23 


4.75 


2.18 


4.16 


2.70 


5.89 


1.89 


4.14 


2.70 


5.89 


2.02 


4.41 


2.56 


5.62 


2.02 


4.41 



tLocal system 
For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



239 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject io 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industri.vl power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 




















5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 




ICnergy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use o 

1 kw of dem 


bill 

f 


Energy rate per 


and 


kwh for use of 
each kw of demand 








1 

1 












11 


2 

J 
l§ 




8 


J2 


^ 


52 


i 




S2 

J 
11 


i2 


8 




i2 
§ 

8 

CO 


i 


^ 


^ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


i 


^ 


i 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2.9 




1.4 


3.06 


4.32 


5.58 


1.35 


2.3 




1.5 




0.33 


2.92 


3.22 


3.52 


3.0 




1.0 


3.15 


4.05 


4.95 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.23 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


2.6 




0.9 


2.79 


3.60 


4.41 


1.20 


1.6 




1.0 




0.30 


2.25 


2.52 


2.79 


°3.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.96 


4.41 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


3.4 




1.4 


3.51 


4.77 


6.03 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°3.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.96 


4.41 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.6- 





0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.69 


3.99 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


2.3 




1.0 


2.52 


3.42 


4.32 


1.20 


1.6 




1.0 




0.30 


2.25 


2.52 


2.79 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


2.4 




1.0 


2.61 


3.51 


4.41 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.25 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


3.8 




1.0 


3.87 


4.77 


5.67 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


2.8 




1.4 


2.97 


4.23 


5.49 


1.35 


2.0 




1.3 




0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


3.29 


2.7 




0.7 


2.88 


3.51 


4.14 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.5 




0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.60 


3.90 


°3.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.32 


4.77 


1.00 


. . . 


2.6 




0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.69 


3.99 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 1 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 . 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 



240 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



Residential service 



a 
a 

tn u 

Is 



Rate per kwh 
for 



o 



8 


o 


(M 


LO 






XJ= 


XXI 


0) ^ 





§1 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Etobicoke Twp. 
(including Thistletown) 

Exeter 

Fergus 

Finch 

Flesherton 



^ No. 

40 
45 
41 
42 



37 



Fonthill 

Forest 

Forest Hill . . 
Fort William . 
Frankford . . . 



Gait 

Georgetown 

Glen Williams. 

tGeraldton 

Glencoe 

Goderich 



tGogama 

Grand Bend . 
Grand Valley 

Granton 

Gravenhurst. 



Grimsby. . . 

Guelph 

Hagersville . 
tHaileybury . 
Hamilton. . 



Hanover . 
Harriston . 
Harrow . . 
Hastings . 
Havelock 



Hawkesbury. 

Hearst 

Hensall 

tHepworth . . . 
Hespeler. 



Highgate 

Holslein 

fHornepayne 

tHudson Townsite. 

Huntsville 



1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 



No. 


i 


i 


i 


i 


$ 


60 


4.0 






1.0 


2.52 


60 


3.0 






1.3 


2.09 


60 


3.3 






1.3 


2.25 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


50 


2.0 


1.0 


0.7 


1.0 


1.35 


60 


3.0 






1.3 


2.09 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


60 


2.0 






0.8 


1.37 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.8 


1.1 


1.75 


60 


3.0 






1.1 


2.02 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


0.9 


1.3 


2.16 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.2 


1.6 


2.70 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


50 


7.0 


3.5 




1.6 


4.72 


60 


4.4 






1.5 


2.92 


60 


3.0 






1.2 


2.05 


60 


3.9 






1.4 


2.61 


50 


2.0 


1.0 


0.7 


1.0 


1.35 


60 


2.5 






1.1 


1.75 


50 


3.6 


1.8 


1.0 


1.4 


2.43 


60 


2.8 






1.1 


1.91 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.1 


1.6 


2.70 


60 


2.6 






1.1 


1.80 


60 


2.2 






1.0 


1.55 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


2.00 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


0.9 


1.4 


2.29 


50 


4.6 


2.3 


1.3 


1.6 


3.10 


60 


3.2 






1.0 


2.09 


50 


3.6 


1.8 


1.1 


1.5 


2.43 


60 


3.2 






1.1 


2.12 


60 


3.2 






0.9 


2.05 


60 


3.0 






1.0 


1.98 


60 


8.0 






2.0 


5.04 


50 


4.4 


2.2 


1.2 


1.6 


2.97 


60 


2.4 






1.2 


1.73 



4.32 
4.43 
4.59 
4.41 
3.01 

4.43 
3.55 
4.41 
2.81 
3.87 

4.00 
4.45 
4.72 
5.94 
3.55 
4.41 

10.17 
5.62 
4.21 
5.13 
3.01 

3.73 
5.31 
3.89 
5.89 
3.78 

3.35 
4.45 
4.45 
3.55 
4.45 

4.99 
6.79 
3.89 
5.35 
4.10 

3.67 
3.78 
8.64 
6.48 
3.89 



fLocal system 
For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



241 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industrial power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 


























5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 


^ 

^ 

§. 




Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net 
1 k 


monthly 
for use o 
w of dem 


bill 

f 


Energy rate per 


and 


kwh for use of 
each kw of demand 








a; 

2 

c 

03 

E 

Q 


















8 


3 

ll 




g 

x: 

8 


§ 


J 


S2 

Is 




i 


li 


i2 


8 


J 




jf 


i 


^ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


i 


i 


^ 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


2.6 




0.8 


2.79 


3.51 


4.23 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


2.8 




1.1 


2.97 


3.96 


4.95 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


1.89 


2.61 


3.06 


1.00 




1.0 




0.5 


0.33 


1.80 


2.25 


2.55 


2.5 




1.2 


2.70 


3.78 


4.86 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.07 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


1.9 




0.4 


2.16 


2.52 


2.88 


1.00 


1.4 




0.9 




0.25 


1.93 


2.16 


2.38 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.07 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 




1.1 




0.5 


0.33 


1.89 


2.34 


2.64 


2.5 




1.0 


2.70 


3.60 


4.50 


1.20 


1.6 




1.0 




0.30 


2.25 


2.52 


2.79 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 




2.9 




0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.96 


4.26 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


5.8 


0.8 


0.5 


5.67 


6.39 


6.84 


1.00 




5.1 




0.5 


0.33 


5.49 


5.94 


6.24 


3.9 




1.3 


3.96 


5.13 


6.30 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 


2.5 




1.2 


2.70 


3.78 


4.86 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


3.4 




1.3 


3.51 


4.68 


5.85 


1.35 


2.6 




1.7 




0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


3.74 


°1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


1.89 


2.61 


3.06 


1.00 




1.1 




0.5 


0.33 


1.89 


2.34 


2.64 


2.0 




1.0 


2.25 


3.15 


4.05 


1.20 


1.7 




1.2 




0.30 


2.38 


2.65 


2.92 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


2.3 




0.9 


2.52 


3.33 


4.14 


1.20 


1.7 




1.2 




0.30 


2.38 


2.65 


2.92 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


cl.9 




0.7 


2.16 


2.79 


3.42 


1.00 


1.4 




0.9 




0.40 


1.93 


2.29 


2.65 


1.7 




1.0 


1.98 


2.88 


3.78 


1.00 


1.5 




0.9 




0.30 


1.98 


2.25 


2.52 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.25 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°3.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.33 


4.05 


4.50 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°3.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.96 


4.68 


5.13 


1.00 




3.2 




0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.23 


4.53 


2.7 




0.9 


2.88 


3.69 


4.50 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°3.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.33 


4.05 


4.50 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


2.6 




0.9 


2.79 


3.60 


4.41 


1.20 


1.6 


.... 


1.0 




0.33 


2.25 


2.55 


2.84 


2.8 




0.7 


2.97 


3.60 


4.23 


1.35 


2.6 




1.7 




0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


3.74 


2.5 




0.8 


2.70 


3.42 


4.14 


1.35 


3.5 




2.3 




0.33 


3.82 


4.12 


4.42 


7.5 




2.0 


7.20 


9.00 


10.80 


1.35 


4.9 




3.3 




0.33 


4.90 


5.20 


5.50 


°3.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.96 


4.68 


5.13 


1.00 




3.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.96 


4.41 


4.71 


2.2 




1.1 


2.43 


3.42 


4.41 


1.20 


1.6 




1.0 




0.30 


2.25 


2.52 


2.79 



242 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



o ^ 

2^ 



Residential service 



a 
a 

!/) (J 

B 



Rate per kwh 
for 






~ o 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Ingersoll 

Iroquois 

Jarvis 

tJellicoe Townsite. 
Kapuskasing 



fKearns Townsite 

Kemptville 

Killaloe Station 

Kincardine 

tKing Kirkland Townsite 



Kingston 

Kingsville 

KirkHeld 

tKirk'and Lake (including 

Swastika) 

Kitchener 



No. 
43 
40 
45 
45 
35 

45 
40 
42 
43 
42 



Lakefield 

Lambeth 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Larder Lake Twp. 



Latchford . . 
Leamington. 
Lindsay. . . . 
Listowel .... 
London .... 



41 



Long Branch 
L'Orignal . . . . 

Lucan 

Lucknow. . 
Lynden 



Madoc 
Magnetawan. 
Markdale . 
Markham . 
Marmora . . 



45 



Martintown 

Massey 

tMatachewan Twp. 

tMatheson 

tMattawa 



i 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 



No. 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
50 

50 
60 

55 
60 
50 
50 
60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
50 
55 
50 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



3.4 
2.8 
3.2 
4.4 
3.0 

3.6 
3.0 

4.2 
2.4 
3.6 

1.8 
2.4 
3.2 

3.6 
2.6 

2.8 
3.5 
2.2 
2.4 
3.5 

3.0 
2.8 
2.6 
2.8 
3.0 

3.1 
3.8 
3.2 
2.7 
3.0 

2.4 
4.2 
2.5 
3.2 
2.8 

2.8 
5.0 
3.6 
3.4 
5.2 



1.4 
1.6 
2.2 
1.5 

1.8 
1.5 
2.1 
1.2 
1.8 



1.2 
1.6 



1.8 



1.1 
1.2 



1.9 
1.6 

1.5 

1.2 
2.1 

1.6 
1.4 

1.4 
2.5 
1.8 
1.7 
2.6 



0.9 
1.2 
0.9 

1.1 

1.2 
0.7 
1.1 



0.7 
1.0 



1.1 



0.7 
0.7 



0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 



1.1 
1.0 

0.8 

0.7 
1.2 

1.0 
0.8 

0.8 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 



1.3 
1.0 
1.3 
1.6 
1.2 

1.5 
0.9 
1.6 
1.0 
1.5 

0.9 
1.0 
1.4 

1.5 
1.3 

1.0 
1.3 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 

1.2 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 

1.2 
1.5 
1.4 
1.0 
1.2 

1.0 
1.6 
1.0 
1.4 
1.1 

1.1 
1.6 
1.5 
1.4 
1.6 



2.30 
1.89 
2.16 
2.97 
2.02 

2.43 
2.02 
2.83 
1.62 
2.43 

1.30 
1.62 
2.16 

2.43 
1.87 

1.79 
2.36 
1.48 
1.62 
2.29 

2.02 
1.89 
1.75 
1.89 
2.02 

2.11 
2.56 
2.16 
1.75 
2.02 

1.62 
2.83 
1.71 
2.16 
1.89 

1.89 
3.37 
2.43 
2.29 
3.51 



4.64 
4.23 
4.72 
6.48 
4.45 

5.35 
4.45 
6.21 
3.55 
5.35 

2.92 
3.55 

4.77 

5.35 
4.21 

3.59 

4.70 
3.28 
3.55 
4.27 

4.41 
4.14 
3.87 
4.14 
4.50 

4.27 
5.62 

4.77 
3.55 
4.41 

3.55 
6.21 
3.51 

4.77 
4.14 

4.14 
7.38 
5.35 
5.04 

7.74 



fLocal system 
F"or explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



243 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industrial power service 


Demand rate 
























per 100 watts 
























5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly 


bill 


> 


Energy rate per kwh 




Net 


monthly 


bill 




for use of 
1 kw of demand 


^ 


for use of 
each kw of demand 




for use ol 
1 kw of dem 




Energy rate per 
kwh for use of 


and 








V 
















each kw of demand 








2 




















2 
















2 








(A 


!/) 


3 


C/3 




C/) 


r3 




(/> 




c/> 


3 


'75 


(« 


!/; 




U 


1 O 


u 






S 




u 




u 




l_ 


u 




3 




Sf 




3 


3 


u 




t_i 


3 


"rt -C 


3 


3 


3 


O 






O 




^ 


3 






O 


1« 









-u^ 


4-> J2 


"3 


JZ 


JZ 


jC 


Q 


*.o 


*j -C 


■M O 


*jJ3 


JZ 


J= 


JZ 


l§ 


II 


<-B 


8 


i 


1 




Is 


l§ 


II 


l§ 




8 


1 


1 


^ 


^ 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2.8 




0.8 


2.97 


3.69 


4.41 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


i.OO 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°3.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.96 


4.68 


5.13 


1.00 




3.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.96 


4.41 


4.71 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


1.5 




0.9 


1.80 


2.61 


3.42 


1.20 


1.4 




0.9 




0.30 


2.11 


2.38 


2.65 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


2.3 




1.0 


2.52 


3.42 


4.32 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 


.... 


0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


2.4 




0.8 


2.61 


3.33 


4.05 


1.20 


1.7 




1.2 




0.30 


2.38 


2.65 


2.92 


3.1 




1.1 


3.24 


4.23 


5.22 


1.35 


4.1 




2.7 




0.33 


4.27 


4.57 


4.87 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.25 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


3.0 




1.0 


3.15 


4.05 


4.95 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0..33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.2 




0.8 


2.43 


3.15 


3.87 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


].00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°3.7 


0.8 


0.5 


3.78 


4.50 


4.95 


1.00 




2.8 




0.5 


0.33 


3.42 


3.87 


4.17 


2.0 




1.0 


2.25 


3.15 


4.05 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°4.4 


0.8 


0.5 


4.41 


5.13 


5.58 


1.00 




3.1 




0.5 


0.33 


3.69 


4.14 


4.44 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°3.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


5.2 


0.8 


0.5 


5.13 


5.85 


6.30 


1.00 




3.2 




0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.23 


4.53 



244 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



C 


S 




£ 


S =" 


B 






3 




o;^ 


C 


K 


§8 


3 


C 




•o 








rt 


ss. 


x 




^L, 


OfJ 


!U 


a 






b 


o 


8 



Residential service 



a; 



s 



Rate per kwh 
for 



8 






o 
? 



J2 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Maxville . . . 
McGarry . . . 

Meaford 

Merlin 

Merrickville . 



Midland. . 
Mildmay. 
Millbrook . 
Milton . . . 
Milverton 



Mimico 

Mitchell 

Moorefield 

Morrisburg .... 
Mount Brydges 

Mount Forest . . 

Napanee 

Neustadt 

Newboro 

Newburgh 



Newbury 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg 
tNew Liskeard. . 
Newmarket . . . . 



New Toronto . 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls 
Nipigon Twp. 
North Bay . . . 



North York Twp. . 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville-Trafalgar. 
Oil Springs 



Omemee . . 
Orangevilk 

Orilha 

Orono 

Oshawa . . . 



^ No. 
43 
40 
42 
44 
38 

39 
40 
41 
43 
45 

37 
40 
43 
40 
41 



39 



40 



40 



42 



46 



30 



1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 



No. 
50 
60 
60 
60 
50 

50 
60 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
60 

60 
60 
50 
50 
60 

50 
60 
50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
60 
50 
50 



2.6 
3.5 
2.6 
3.1 

2.8 

1.8 
2.5 
3.0 
3.2 
3.4 

2.6 
3.4 
2.8 
2.4 
3.4 

2.6 
2.6 
2.0 
3.8 
4.3 

2.8 
2.8 
3.0 
4.0 
2.5 

2.6 
3.0 
3.5 
2.2 
2.5 

3.4 
3.4 
2.6 
3.6 
2.8 

3.3 
3.0 
2.3 
3.0 
2.2 



1.3 



1.4 

0.9 

1.5 
1.6 
1.7 

1.3 
1.7 
1.4 
1.2 
1.7 

1.3 
1.3 
1.0 
1.9 



1.4 
1.4 
1.5 
2.0 



1.4 
1.1 



1.7 

1.3 
1.8 
1.4 



1.5 



1.5 
1.1 



0.8 



0.7 

0.9 
1.0 
1.0 



1.0 
0.8 
0.7 
1.0 

0.8 
0.8 
0.7 



0.8 



0.9 
1.1 



0.7 



0.8 
1.0 
0.8 



0.9 



0.8 

0.7 



1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.2 
1.4 
1.4 

0.9 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 
1.4 

1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.2 

1.1 
1.0 
1.2 
1.6 
1.0 

1.2 
1.4 
0.7 
1.0 
1.2 

1.0 
1.2 
1.1 
1.4 
1.1 

1.0 
1.2 
0.9 
1.2 
1.0 



1.75 
2.29 
1.76 
2.03 
1.89 

1.21 
1.71 
2.02 
2.16 
2.29 

1.75 
2.29 
1.89 
1.62 
2.29 

1.75 
1.75 
1.35 
2.56 
2.75 

1.89 
1.89 
2.02 
2.70 
1.71 

1.84 
2.12 
2.20 
1.48 
1.78 

2.29 
2.27 
1.75 
2.43 
1.89 

2.14 
2.02 
1.57 
2.02 
1.48 



3.87 
4.27 
3.56 
3.83 
4.14 

2.74 
3.51 
4.45 
4.77 
5.04 

3.91 
5.04 
4.14 
3.55 
5.04 

3.87 
3.87 
3.01 
5.58 
4.91 

4.14 
4 23 
4.45 
5.89 
3.51 

4.00 
4.64 
4.41 
3.28 
3.94 

5.04 
4.43 
3.87 
5.31 
4.14 

3.94 
4.45 
3.19 
4.41 
3.28 



■Local system 
For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



245 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industrial power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 






















5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 






Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use o 

1 kw of dem 


bill 


Energy rate per 


and 


kwh for use of 
each kw of demand 








Q 
















2 
11 


S2 

<-3 


S2 



8 


3 

O 

Si 


§ 

s: 




3 




A 


2 

11 


1 

8 


1 


'J) 

1 

s: 


i 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


<t 


^ 


^ 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


3.0 




1.0 


3.15 


4.05 


4.95 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 


2.2 




0.8 


2.43 


3.15 


3.87 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


2.6 




0.7 


2.79 


3.42 


4.05 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.1 




0.5 


0.33 


1.89 


2.34 


2.64 


°1.5 


0.8 


0.5 


1.80 


2.52 


2.97 


1.00 




0.8 




0.5 


0.33 


1.62 


2.07 


2.37 


2.0 




0.9 


2.25 


3.06 


3.87 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


1.89 


2.61 


3.06 


1.00 




1.0 




0.5 


0.33 


1.80 


2.25 


2.55 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


3.8 




1.2 


3.87 


4.95 


6.03 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


2.2 




1.0 


2.43 


3.33 


4.23 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


2.5 




1.2 


2.70 


3.78 


4.86 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 


2.0 




0.9 


2.25 


3.06 


3.87 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


3.0 




1.0 


3.15 


4.05 


4.95 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


2.8 




0.8 


2.97 


3.69 


4.41 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


1.8 




0.8 


2.07 


2.79 


3.51 


1.00 


1.4 




0.9 




0.30 


1.93 


2.20 


2.47 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.07 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 




1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 



246 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 












u 












3 


J_ 


D. 


C 


a 


3^ 






,^ 






3 


c 


f^ 


•o 


■^ 








X 


^ 


o.^ 


V) 


0) 


6 


o 


§ 




X 


3 




■ 


z 



Residential service 



Rate per kwh 
for 



8 



C3 3 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Ottawa (including East- 
view and Rockliffe 

Park) 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 



Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound .... 
Penetangu ishene 
Perth 



Peterborough 

Petrolia 

Pickering 

tPickle Lake Landing 

Townsilt' 

Picton 



Plattsville 

Point Edward . 
Port Arthur . 
Port Burwell. . 
tPortCarling. . 



Port Col borne 
Port Credit . . 
Port Dover. . . 
Port Elgin. ... 
Port Hope 



Port McNicoll 
Port Perry... 
Port Rowan . . 
Port Stanley.. 
tPowassan 



Prescott . . 
Preston . . . 
Priceville . 
Princeton . 
Queenston . 



Rainy River. . . 
tRed Lake Twp. 
Red Rock 

Renfrew 

Richmond 



^ No. 


^ 


No. 


^ 


<* 


^ 


^ 


$ 


$ 


32 




a/ 60 
[60 


*/2.0 
\1.0 






*0.5 


1.74 


3.02 


43 


L5 


60 


3.0 






1.0 


1.98 


3.78 


38 


1.5 


60 


2.4 






1.1 


1.69 


3.67 


45 


1.5 


60 


3.5 






1.0 


2.25 


4.05 


44 


1.5 


60 


2.6 






1.0 


1.76 


3.56 


42 


1.5 


60 


2.8 






1.3 


1.98 


4.32 


44 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


0.9 


1.3 


2.16 


4.72 


42 


1.5 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


1.0 


1.4 


2.29 


5.04 


37 


1.5 


50 


2.2 


1.1 


0.7 


1.0 


1.48 


3.28 


37 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 




1.0 


1.89 


4.23 


36 


1.5 


60 


2.6 






1.3 


1.87 


4.21 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


1.0 


1.4 


2.16 


4.77 


37 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.1 


1.6 


2.70 


5.89 


45 


1.5 


50 


4.4 


2.2 


1.2 


1.6 


2.97 


6.48 


41 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.8 


1.1 


1.75 


3.87 


42 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


38 


L5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


4.45 


34 


1.5 


60 


2.0 






0.8 


1.37 


2.81 


45 




50 


4.4 


2.2 


1.3 


1.6 


2.97 


6.52 


41 


1.5 


50 


4.4 


2.2 


1.2 


1.6 


2.97 


6.48 


41 


1.5 


60 


2.8 






1.2 


1.94 


4.10 


38 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


44 


1.5 


60 


2.4 






1.2 


1.73 


3.89 


45 


1.5 


60 


3.5 






1.3 


2.36 


4.70 


40 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


4.45 


39 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.8 


1.1 


1.75 


3.87 


41 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.7 


1.0 


1.75 


3.82 


45 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


1.0 


1.4 


2.16 


4.77 


42 


1.5 


50 


3.6 


1.8 


1.0 


1.4 


2.43 


5.31 


37 


1.5 


50 


2.2 


1.1 


0.7 


1.0 


1.48 


3.28 


36 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


4.45 


47 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


1.2 


1.6 


2.70 


5.94 


45 


1.5 


60 


3.0 






1.0 


1.98 


3.78 


40 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 




0.8 


1.75 


3.87 


57 


1.5 


50 


6.0 


3.0 




1.6 


4.05 


8.82 


45 


1.5 


50 


4.4 


2.2 


1.2 


1.6 


2.97 


6.48 


32 


1.5 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 


36 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


0.7 


1.0 


1.75 


3.82 


35 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


4.41 



tl^ocal system 
For explanatory notes and water-he? ting schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



247 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

arc subjeci to 10% prompt payiiient discount 
mom hi y char<^c 



Commercial service 



Industrial power service 



Demand rate 

per 100 watts 

5.0 cents, 

minimum 50 cents 



Energy rate per 

kwh lor use of 

each kw of demand 



Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 



Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 



£2 



3 


S2 

ll 


i 


i 




0.5 


1.3 




1.1 




1.7 




1.0 




1.1 






0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 


0.9 






0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 


0.9 






0.5 




0.5 


1.3 






0.5 


1.2 




1.6 






0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 


1.4 






0.5 




0.8 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 



•a — 



Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 



i 


^ 


0.8 


0.5 




0.8 


0.8 


0.5 




1.0 




0.8 




0.8 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 




1.2 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 




0.4 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 




1.1 


0.8 


0.5 




1.0 




1.0 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 




0.8 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 



2.25 

2.70 
2.25 
3.15 
2.43 

2.52 
3.06 
2.97 
1.89 
2.25 

2.34 
3.33 
2.43 

3.96 
2.34 

2.79 
2.88 
2.16 
3.51 
4.23 

2.70 
2.43 
2.25 
2.97 
2.52 

2.61 
2.16 
2.70 
3.06 
3.51 

2.34 
2.70 
3.87 
2.88 
2.61 

4.95 
3.96 
1.98 
2.07 
2.79 



2.97 

3.42 
2.97 
4.05 
3.15 

3.24 
3.78 
3.69 
2.61 
2.97 

3.42 
4.05 
3.15 

4.68 
3.06 

3.51 
3.60 
2.52 
4.23 
4.95 

3.69 
3.15 
3.15 
3.87 
3.24 

3.33 
2.88 
3.42 
3.78 
4.23 

3.06 
3.42 
4.59 
3.60 
3.33 

5.67 
4.68 
2.70 
2.79 
3.51 



3.42 

4.14 
3.42 
4.95 
3.87 

3.96 
4.23 
4.14 
3.06 
3.42 

4.50 
4.50 
3.60 

5.13 
3.51 

3.96 
4.05 
2.88 
4.68 
5.40 

4.68 
3.60 
4.05 
4.77 
3.69 

3.78 
3.33 
3.87 
4.23 
4.68 

3.51 
3.87 
5.04 
4.32 
3.78 

6.12 
5.13 
3.15 
3.24 
3.96 



$ 


i 


i 


1.00 




1.4 


1.35 


2.0 




1.00 


1.5 




1.35 


2.6 




1.20 


1.6 




1.00 


1.5 




1.00 




2.2 


1.00 




2.1 


1.00 




1.0 


1.00 




1.3 


1.20 


1.4 




1.00 




2.7 


1.00 




1.6 


1.00 




3.4 


1.00 




1.6 


1.00 




2.0 


1.00 




1.6 


1.00 


1.4 




1.00 




2.5 


1.00 




2.7 


1.20 


1.9 




1.00 




1.7 


1.20 


1.7 




1.35 


2.5 




1.00 


... 


1.6 


1.00 




1.9 


1.00 




1.4 


1.00 




2.0 


1.00 




2.4 


1.00 




2.7 


1.00 




1.3 


1.00 




1.5 


1.00 




2.9 


1.20 


2.1 




1.00 




1.8 


1.00 




4.0 


1.00 




3.4 


1.00 




0.9 


1.00 




1.2 


1.00 




2.1 



0.33 

0.33 
0.30 
0.33 
0.30 

0.30 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 

0.30 
0.33 
0.33 

0.33 
0.33 

0.33 
0.33 
0.25 
0.33 
0.33 

0.30 
0.33 
0.30 
0.33 
0.33 

0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 

0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.30 
0.33 

0.50 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 



$ 


$ 


2.16 


2.61 


2.70 


3.00 


2.07 


2.34 


3.15 


3.45 


2.25 


2.52 


2.07 


2.34 


2.88 


3.33 


2.79 


3.24 


1.80 


2.25 


2.07 


2.52 


2.11 


2.38 


3.33 


3.78 


2.34 


2.79 


3.96 


4.41 


2.34 


2.79 


2.70 


3.15 


2.34 


2.79 


1.93 


2.16 


3.15 


3.60 


3.33 


3.78 


2.52 


2.79 


2.43 


2.88 


2.38 


2.65 


3.06 


3.36 


2.34 


2.79 


2.61 


3.06 


2.16 


2.61 


2.70 


3.15 


3.06 


3.51 


3.33 


3.78 


2.07 


2.52 


2.25 


2.70 


3.51 


3.96 


2.65 


2.92 


2.52 


2.97 


4.50 


5.22 


3.96 


4.41 


1.71 


2.16 


1.98 


2.43 


2.79 


3.24 



248 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rales are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



Si2 £ 



wo 



Residential service 



a 
a 

ID O 

^^ 



Rate per kwh 
for 



o 


o 


C^l 


LC 






X J3 


X^ 




Z^ 



re 3 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Richmond Hill. 

Ridgetown 

Ripley 

Riverside 

Rockland 



Rockwood ... 

Rodney 

Rosseau 

Russell 

St. Catharines . 



St. Clair Beach . 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas. . . , 



Sandwich East Twp. . 
Sandwich West Twp. 

Sarnia 

Scarborough Twp. . . . 
Schreiber Twp 



Seaforth 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout . 
Smith's Falls. . 



Smithville 

Southampton . . . 
tSouth Porcupine 

Townsite 

South River .... 
Springfield 



Stamford Twp. 

Stayner 

Stirling 

Stoney Creek . 
Stouffville. . . . 



Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville . . . 
Sturgeon Falls . 
Sudbury 



43 



No. 
40 
45 
43 
36 
36 

45 
45 
43 
36 
42 

42 
44 
42 

40 

41 
41 
40 

37 



31 



38 



i 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

D 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 



No. 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 

50 
60 
50 
50 
60 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
60 
60 

60 
50 

50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
60 
50 
60 



C 

3.4 

2.9 

2.8 

3.2 

2.6 

3.4 
2.5 
3.4 
2.2 
2.7 

3.6 
2.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.2 

4.0 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 
2.0 

3.0 
2.8 
2.2 
4.0 
2.6 

3.2 
3.2 

3.4 
6.0 
2.6 

3.2 

2.4 
2.8 
3.0 
3.4 

2.9 
2.8 
2.9 
3.2 
2.6 



1.7 

1.4 
1.6 
1.3 

1.7 

1.7 
1.1 



1.8 
1.0 

1.5 
1.6 

2.0 
2.0 
1.5 
1.5 
1.0 

1.5 
1.4 
1.1 



1.7 
3.0 
1.3 



1.2 
1.4 
1.5 
1.7 



1.4 
1.6 



1.0 

0.8 
0.9 
0.8 

1.0 

1.0 
0.7 



1.1 
0.7 

0.9 

1.1 

0.9 

0.7 

0.8 
0.8 

0.7 



1.0 
0.7 



0.7 
0.8 
0.8 
1.0 



0.8 
1.0 



i 


1.4 


1.1 


1.1 


1.3 


1.1 


1.4 


1.0 


1.4 


1.0 


1.5 


1.5 


1.0 


1.1 


1.2 


1.3 


1.6 


1.0 


1.2 


1.0 


1.0 


1.2 


1.1 


1.0 


1.5 


1.0 


1.2 


1.1 


1.4 


1.6 


1.0 


1.4 


1.0 


1.1 


1.2 


1.4 


1.2 


1.1 


1.3 


1.4 


1.2 



$ 

2.29 
1.96 
1.89 
2.16 
1.75 

2.29 
1.71 
2.29 
1.48 
2.00 

2.43 
1.35 
2.02 
2.02 
2.16 

2.70 
2.70 
2.02 
2.00 
1.35 

2.02 
1.89 
1.48 
2.70 
1.76 

2.16 
1.93 

2.29 
4.05 
1.75 

2.23 
1.62 
1.89 
2.02 
2.29 

2.00 
1.89 
2.03 
2.16 
1.84 



5.04 
3.94 
4.14 
4.72 
3.87 

5.04 
3.51 
5.04 
3.28 
4.70 

5.35 
3.01 
4.00 
4.45 
4.90 

5.89 
5.85 
4.45 
4.50 
3.01 

4.41 
4.14 
3.28 
5.40 
3.56 

4.32 
3.91 

5.04 
8.82 
3.82 

4.75 
3.55 
4.14 
4.41 
5.04 

4.16 
4.14 
4.37 

4.77 
4.00 



tLocal system 
For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



249 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industrial power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 






















5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 


1 




Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use o 

1 kw of dem 


bill 
f 


Energy rate per 

kwh for use of 

each kw of demand 


and 








T3 
C 

Q 














i 


i 
ll 




2 

3 
O 

8 


3 

O 

8 


en 




li 




U5 

1 




§ 

X! 

8 


{ 


t 


i 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


^ 


i 


i 


i 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


2.4 




0.9 


2.61 


3.42 


4.23 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


2.2 




0.8 


2.43 


3.15 


3.87 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


1.89 


2.61 


3.06 


1.00 




1.1 




0.5 


0.33 


1.89 


2.34 


2.64 


c2.3 




1.1 


2.52 


3.51 


4.50 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.07 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


2.5 




1.0 


2.70 


3.60 


4.50 


1.20 


1.7 




1.2 




0.30 


2.38 


2.65 


2.92 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°3.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.32 


4.77 


1.00 




3.0 




0.5 


0.33 


3.60 


4.05 


4.35 


°3.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.96 


4.41 


1.00 




2.6 




0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.69 


3.99 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°1.7 


0.8 


0.5 


1.98 


2.70 


3.15 


1.00 


... 


1.2 




0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.43 


2.73 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




.1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


3.5 




2.0 


3.60 


5.40 


7.20 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


2.0 




0.7 


2.25 


2.88 


3.51 


1.00 


1.5 




1.1 




0.25 


2.07 


2.29 


2.52 


2.8 




1.1 


2.97 


3.96 


4.95 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


2.9 




1.1 


3.06 


4.05 


5.04 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


°3.3 


0.8 


ll 


3.42 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°5.3 


0.8 


5.22 


5-^4 


6.39 


1.00 




4.5 




0.5 


0.33 


4.95 


5.40 


5.70 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


2.9 




1.3 


3.06 


4.23 


5.40 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.07 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°3.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.96 


4.41 


1.00 




2.5 




0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.60 


3.90 


2.4 




0.7 


2.61 


3.24 


3.87 


1.20 


1.7 




1.2 




0.30 


2.38 


2.65 


2.92 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


2.4 




1.3 


2.61 


3.78 


4.95 


1.20 


■ 2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.4 




1.2 


2.61 


3.69 


4.77 


1.35 


2.0 




1.3 




0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


3.29 



250 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



.S 

Is 


1 

E 








1 


3 


i^ 


a 


?8 


e 

3 


c 


II 


ii 






?l 


^ 


v> 


u 


E 




S 


s 






E 


3 






■ 


z 



Residential service 



Rate per kwh 
lor 












re J2 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Sunderland . 
Sundridge . . 

Sutton 

Swansea . . . . 
Tara 



Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Teeswater 

Terrace Bay Twp. 
Thamesford 



Thamesville . 
Thedford . . . 
Thessalon . . 
Thornbury . 
Thorndale. . 



fThornloe . . 
Thornton. . . 
Thorold. . . 
Tilbury .. . . 
Tillsonburg. 



tTimmins (including 
Schumacher j 

Toronto (including 
Leaside ) 

Toronto Twp 

Tottenham 

Trenton 



Tweed 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill... . 
Victoria Harbour. 
VValkerton 



Wallaceburg . . 
Wardsville . . . 
Warkworth . 
Wasaga Beach 
Waterdown . . . 



Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Waubaushene. 
V-'ebbwood . . . 



^ No. 




No. 


i 


^ 


40 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


45 


1.5 


60 


2.7 




37 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


41 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


39 


1.5 


60 


2.7 




41 


1.5 


50 


3.6 


1.8 


42 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


32 


1.5 


50 


1.8 


0.9 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


45 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


45 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


48 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


42 


1.5 


60 


3.5 




42 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


42 


1.5 


50 


4.0 


2.0 


39 


1.5 


60 


3.8 




40 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


45 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


40 


1.5 


50 


3.0 


1.5 


42 


1.5 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


** 


1.5 


60 


2.0 




37 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


43 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


34 


1.5 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


37 


1.5 


50 


1.8 


0.9 


39 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


40 


1.5 


50 


3.4 


1.7 


43 


1.5 


60 


3.2 




•^% 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


41 


1.5 


50 


2.4 


1.2 


52 




60 


3.6 




38 


1.5 


50 


2.6 


1.3 


42 


1.5 


50 


3.6 


1.8 


40 


1.5 


60 


2.6 




42 


1.5 


50 


3.2 


1.6 


35 


1.5 


60 


2.6 




45 


1.5 


50 


2.8 


1.4 


42 


1.5 


60 


3.2 




43 




60 


6.0 





0.7 
1.0 



0.8 

1.0 
0.8 
0.7 
1.0 

0.8 
0.7 
1.2 

1.0 

1.1 



0.9 
0.8 



1.0 

1.0 
0.8 
0.7 

0.7 
0.7 
1.0 

0.8 

0.7 

0.8 
1.1 

0.9 
0.8 



1.0 
1.4 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 

1.4 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 
1.4 

1.1 
1.0 
1.6 
1.3 

1.4 

1.6 
1.0 
1.3 
1.2 
1.2 



1.4 

1.4 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 

1.0 
1.0 
1.4 
1.3 
1.1 

1.0 
0.9 
1.1 
1.5 
1.2 

1.3 
1.1 
1.1 
1.2 
2.5 



1.75 
2.29 
1.82 
1.89 
1.75 

1.96 
2.43 
1.75 
1.21 
2.29 

1.89 
1.75 
2.70 
2.36 
2.16 

2.70 
2.41 
2.16 
2.02 
2.02 



2.29 

1.58 
2.16 
1.75 
1.62 

1.21 
1.75 
2.29 
2.20 
1.75 

1.62 
2.27 
1.75 
2.43 
1.84 

2.16 
1.80 
1.89 
2.16 
4.14 



3.82 
5.04 
3.62 
4.23 
3.87 

4.48 
5.31 
3.87 

2.74 
5.04 

4.14 
3.82 
5.94 
4.70 

4.77 

5.89 
4.21 
4.90 
4.45 
4.41 



5.04 

4.10 
4.77 
3.87 
3.55 

2.74 
3.82 
5.04 
4.54 
3.87 

3.55 
3.89 
3.87 
5.35 
4.00 

4.72 
3.78 
4.14 
4.32 
8.64 



i.xa! system 

For explanatory notes and water-heating schedules see pages 252 to 255. 



Statement C 



251 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject lo 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industrial power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 
























5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 






Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use of 

1 kw of dem 


bill 


Energy rate per 


and 


kwh for use of 
each kw of demand 








2 
■a 
c 

i 
















3 
O 

11 




^•2 


8 





12 

X. 


J2 


22 


CO 

xx: 

is 






8 


12 


S2 

3 
O 


i^ 


p 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


^ 


^ 


p 


^ 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


i.OO 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.5 




0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.60 


3.90 


2.4 




0.7 


2.61 


3.24 


3.87 


1.35 


2.0 




1.3 




0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


3.29 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 


.... 


0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


2.3 




1.4 


2.52 


3.78 


5.04 


1.35 


2.2 




1.4 




0.33 


2.83 


3.13 


3.43 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°1.4 


0.8 


0.5 


1.71 


2.43 


2.88 


1.00 




0.9 




0.5 


0.33 


1.71 


2.16 


2.46 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


4.0 


O.S 


0.5 


4.05 


4.77 


5.22 


1.00 




3.2 




0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.23 


4.53 


3.1 




1.3 


3.24 


4.41 


5.58 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


3.3 




1.0 


3.42 


4.32 


5.22 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


2.5 


O.S 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°3.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 




2.4 




0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.51 


3.81 


b2.1 




0.7 


2.65 


3.28 


3.91 


1.10 


2.1 




1.4 




0.38 


2.56 


2.91 


3.25 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


°1.6 


0.8 


0.5 


1.89 


2.61 


3.06 


1.00 




0.8 




0.5 


0.33 


1.62 


2.07 


2.37 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.7 




1.3 


2.88 


4.05 


5.22 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.4 




0.5 


0.33 


2.16 


2.61 


2.91 


°1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.16 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 




1.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.07 


2.52 


2.82 


3.2 




0.8 


3.33 


4.05 


4.77 


1.35 


2.8 




1.8 




0.33 


3.28 


3.58 


3.88 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.5 




0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.60 


3.90 


2.2 




1.2 


2.43 


3.51 


4.59 


1.20 


1.9 




1.3 




0.30 


2.52 


2.79 


3.06 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.0 


.... 


0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


2.2 




1.0 


2.43 


3.33 


4.23 


1.20 


2.1 




1.4 




0.30 


2.65 


2.92 


3.19 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




2.2 




0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.33 


3.63 


2.6 




1.2 


2.79 


3.87 


4.95 


1.35 


3.2 




2.1 




0.33 


3.60 


3.90 


4.19 


5.5 




2.5 


5.40 


7.65 


9.90 


1.35 


3.5 




2.3 




0.33 


3.82 


4.12 


4.42 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS 

in effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
and a minimum 



Municipality 



2^ 



Residential service 



S 



Rate per kwh 
for 



o 



Net monthly bill 
for 



Weiland 

Wellesley 

Wellington 

West Ferris Twp 
West Lome 

Weston 

Westport 

Wheatley 

Whitby 

tWhite River .... 

Wiarton 

Williamsburg . . , 

Winchester 

Windermere .... 
Windsor 

Wingham 

Wood bridge .... 

Woodstock 

Woodville 

Wyoming 

York Twp 

Zurich 



i No. 
41 
42 
43 
37 
43 

37 
38 
45 
36 
60 





1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 



1.5 



No. 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
60 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
60 
50 

50 
60 



3.2 
3.3 
2.4 
3.6 
3.0 

3.0 
2.4 
3.3 
3.0 
7.0 

2.8 
2.0 
2.6 
3.2 
2.4 

2.4 
2.8 
3.0 
3.8 
2.6 

2.6 
3.7 



i 


^ 


^ 


$ 


$ 


1.6 




0.9 


2.16 


4.72 






1.3 


2.25 


4.59 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 


1.8 


1.1 


1.5 


2.43 


5.35 


1.5 




0.9 


2.02 


4.45 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


4.41 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 






1.2 


2.21 


4.37 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


2.02 


4.41 


3.5 




1.6 


4.72 


10.17 


1.4 




1.0 


1.89 


4.23 






0.8 


1.37 


2.81 


1.3 




0.9 


1.75 


3.91 


1.6 


1.0 


1.4 


2.16 


4.77 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 


1.2 


0.7 


1.0 


1.62 


3.55 


1.4 


0.8 


1.1 


1.89 


4.14 


1.5 


0.9 


1.2 


2.02 


4.45 






1.2 


2.48 


4.64 


1.3 


0.7 


1.0 


1.75 


3.82 


1.3 


0.8 


1.1 


1.75 


3.87 






1.2 


2.43 


4.59 



6.34 
6.93 
4.81 
7.33 
6.07 

5.85 
4.81 
6.53 
5.85 
13.05 

6.03 
4.25 
5.53 
6.57 
4.81 

4.81 
5.58 
6.07 
6.80 
5.08 

5.31 
6.75 



tLoca! system 

NOTES 
Service Charges 

a Z?)<l:, per month per service when the permanently installed appliance load is under 2,000 watts and 

66^ per month when 2,000 watts or more, 
b Demand rate 8.50 per 100 watts, minimum 500. 
c Minimum demand charge 250. 

■ House Heating 

Applicable where electric energy is used to heat an entire dwelling or a portion of a dwelling in excess 
of 25 /c of the floor area. 
D PZnergy billed within regular residential structure. 



Statement C 



253 



Utilities and Local Systems 
FOR ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1961 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
monthly charge 



Commercial service 


Industrl-vl power service 


Demand rate 
per 100 watts 






















5.0 cents, 
minimum 50 cents 


Net monthly bill 

for use of 
1 kw of demand 


^ 

^ 

t 




Energy rate per kwh 

for use of 
each kw of demand 




Net monthly 

for use ol 

1 kw of dem 


bill 


Energy rate per 


and 


kwh for use of 
each kw of demand 








a; 

c 
E 

Q 




















§ 

8 




i 


Is 


(2 

3 


li 


S2 


2 

J 
l§ 


i2 
:= o 


2 

8 


J 


i2 


i 


i^ 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 





i 


t 


^ 


$5 


$ 


$ 


$ 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


2.8 




1.2 


2.97 


4.05 


5.13 


1.35 


2.0 




1.3 




0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


3.29 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 




0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 




2.0 




0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.15 


3.45 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 




2.1 




0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.24 


3.54 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.7 




0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.88 


3.18 


2.9 




1.2 


3.06 


4.14 


5.22 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°5.8 


0.8 


0.5 


5.67 


6.39 


6.84 


1.00 




5.1 




0.5 


0.33 


5.49 


5.94 


6.24 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


2.0 




0.8 


2.25 


2.97 


3.69 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.25 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 




2.3 




0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.42 


3.72 


°2 2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


2.34 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 




1.6 




0.5 


0.33 


2.34 


2.79 


3.09 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


2.52 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 




1.8 


.... 


0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.97 


3.27 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


2.43 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


3.2 




1.2 


3.33 


4.41 


5.49 


1.35 


2.5 




1.6 




0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


3.65 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


2.61 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 




1.9 




0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


3.06 


3.36 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.25 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 




1.5 




0.5 


0.33 


2.25 


2.70 


3.00 


3.4 




0.9 


3.51 


4.32 


5.13 


1.35 


3.1 




2.0 




0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


4.10 



NOTES 
Special Rates or Discounts 

*First 60 kwh of monthly consumption at 2.095, second 60 kwh and all kwh in excess of 1,000 at 1.0^. 
**Flat-rate water-heater service — Toronto: 

System-owned — First 400 watts $2.90 per month. 

Each 100 watts additional 400 per month, plus a monthl\- charge for larger tank 
sizes as follows: 

300 for 1,000- watt and 1,200- watt heaters. 
400 for 1,500-watt heaters. 
500 for 2,000-watt and 2,500-watt heaters. 
55 for heaters 3,000 watts and over. 
Customer-owned — First 400 watts $1.98 per month. 

Each 100 watts additional 400 per month. 
"Commercial customers with a connected load of under 5 kilowatts billed at residential rates. 
§Farm customers billed at standard rural rates. 
§§Farm customers billed at special rates. 



254 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 
GROSS MONTHLY ENERGY RATES 

Subject to 10% 





Schedule 


Element 




































rating 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


40 


41 


watts 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


400 


1.00 


1.04 


1.08 


1.12 


1.16 


1.20 


1.24 


1.28 


1.32 


1.36 


1.40 


1.44 


1.48 


1.52 


1.56 


1.60 


1.64 


450 


1.12 


1.17 


1.21 


1.26 


1.30 


1.36 


1.40 


1.44 


1.49 


1.53 


1.58 


1.62 


1.67 


1.71 


1.76 


1.80 


1.84 


500 


1.25 


1.30 


1.35 


1.40 


1.45 


1.50 


1.55 


1.60 


1.65 


1.70 


1.75 


1.80 


1.85 


1.90 


1.95 


2.00 


2.05 


550 


1.38 


1.43 


1.49 


1.54 


1.60 


1.66 


1.70 


1.76 


1.81 


1.87 


1.92 


1.98 


2.03 


2.09 


2.14 


2.20 


2.26 


600 


1.50 


1.56 


1.62 


1.68 


1.74 


1.80 


1.86 


1.92 


1.98 


2.04 


2.10 


2.16 


2.22 


2.28 


2.34 


2.40 


2.46 


650 


1.59 


1.66 


1.71 


1.78 


1.84 


1.91 


1.97 


2.03 


2.10 


2.16 


2.22 


2.29 


2.36 


2.41 


2.48 


2.54 


2.61 


700 


1.68 


1.74 


1.81 


1.88 


1.94 


2.01 


2.08 


2.14 


2.21 


2.28 


2.34 


2.41 


2.48 


2.54 


2.61 


2.68 


2.74 


750 


1.78 


1.84 


1.91 


1.99 


2.06 


2.12 


2.20 


2.27 


2.34 


2.41 


2.48 


2.56 


2.62 


2.69 


2.77 


2.83 


2.91 


800 


1.86 


1.93 


2.00 


2.08 


2.16 


2.22 


2.30 


2.38 


2.44 


2.52 


2.60 


2.67 


2.74 


2.82 


2.90 


2.97 


3.04 


850 


1.94 


2.02 


2.10 


2.18 


2.26 


2.33 


2.41 


2.49 


2.57 


2.64 


2.72 


2.80 


2.88 


2.96 


3.03 


3.11 


3.19 


900 


2.04 


2.12 


2.20 


2.29 


2.37 


2.44 


2.53 


2.61 


2.69 


2.78 


2.86 


2.93 


3.02 


3.10 


3.18 


3.27 


3.34 


950 


2.13 


2.22 


2.30 


2.39 


2.48 


2.56 


2.64 


2.73 


2.81 


2.90 


2.99 


3.07 


3.16 


3.24 


3.33 


3.41 


3.50 


1,000 


2.22 


2.31 


2.40 


2.49 


2.58 


2.67 


2.76 


2.84 


2.93 


3.02 


3.11 


3.20 


3.29 


3.38 


3.47 


3.56 


3.64 


1,000 3.000 


2.36 


2.46 


2.55 


2.64 


2.74 


2.83 


2.93 


3.02 


3.12 


3.21 


3.31 


3.40 


3.49 


3.59 


3.68 


3.78 


3.87 


1,500/4.500 


3.54 


3.68 


3.82 


3.97 


4.11 


4.25 


4.39 


4.53 


4.67 


4.82 


4.96 


5.10 


5.24 


5.38 


5.52 


5.67 


5.81 



Note: Gross monthly rates for all balanced element sizes over 1,000 watts are calculated as follows: 

Element rating 



Rate for 1,000-watt element X 



1.000 



Statement C 



255 



Utilities and Local Systems 

FOR FLAT-RATE WATER-HEATING 

prompt payment discount 



Number 



42 


43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


51 


52 


53 


54 


55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


60 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1.68 


1.72 


1.76 


1.80 


1.84 


1.88 


1.92 


1.96 


2.00 


2.04 


2.08 


2.12 


2.16 


2.20 


2.24 


2.28 


2.32 


2.36 


2.40 


1.89 


1.93 


1.98 


2.02 


2.07 


2.11 


2.16 


2.20 


2.26 


2.29 


2.34 


2.38 


2.42 


2.47 


2.52 


2.56 


2.60 


2.66 


2.72 


2.10 


2.15 


2.20 


2.25 


2.30 


2.35 


2.40 


2.45 


2.50 


2.55 


2.60 


2.65 


2.70 


2.75 


2.80 


2.85 


2.90 


2.95 


3.00 


2.31 


2.37 


2.42 


2.48 


2.53 


2.59 


2.64 


2.70 


2.76 


2.81 


2.86 


2.92 


2.98 


3.03 


3.08 


3.14 


3.20 


3.26 


3.32 


2.52 


2.58 


2.64 


2.70 


2.76 


2.82 


2.88 


2.94 


3.00 


3.06 


3.12 


3.18 


3.24 


3.30 


3.36 


3.42 


3.48 


3.54 


3.60 


2.67 


2.73 


2.80 


2.86 


2.92 


2.99 


3.06 


3.11 


3.18 


3.25 


3.32 


3.37 


3.42 


3.49 


3.56 


3.62 


3.68 


3.75 


3.82 


2.81 


2.88 


2.94 


3.01 


3.08 


3.14 


3.21 


3.28 


3.34 


3.42 


3.48 


3.55 


3.62 


3.69 


3.76 


3.82 


3.88 


3.95 


4.02 


2.98 


3.04 


3.12 


3.19 


3.25 


3.33 


3.40 


3.48 


3.54 


3.62 


3.68 


3.75 


3.82 


3.90 


3.98 


4.05 


4.12 


4.18 


4.24 


3.12 


3.19 


3.27 


3.34 


3.41 


3.49 


3.57 


3.63 


3.71 


3.79 


3.86 


3.93 


4.00 


4.08 


4.16 


4.24 


4.32 


4.38 


4.44 


3.27 


3.34 


3.42 


3.50 


3.58 


3.66 


3.73 


3.81 


3.90 


3.96 


4.04 


4.12 


4.20 


4.28 


4.36 


4.44 


4.52 


4.59 


4.66 


3.42 


3.51 


3.59 


3.67 


3.76 


3.83 


3.91 


4.00 


4.08 


4.16 


4.24 


4.32 


4.40 


4.49 


4.58 


4.66 


4.74 


4.81 


4.88 


3.59 


3.67 


3.76 


3.84 


3.92 


4.01 


4.10 


4.18 


4.27 


4.35 


4.44 


4.52 


4.60 


4.69 


4.78 


4.87 


4.96 


5.04 


5.12 


3.73 


3.82 


3.91 


4.00 


4.09 


4.18 


4.27 


4.36 


4.44 


4.53 


4.62 


4.71 


4.80 


4.89 


4.98 


5.07 


5.16 


5.25 


5.34 


3.97 


4.06 


4.16 


4.25 


4.34 


4.44 


4.53 


4.63 


4.72 


4.82 


4.91 


5.01 


5.10 


5.19 


5.29 


5.38 


5.48 


5.57 


5.67 


5.95 


6.09 


6.23 


6.37 


6.52 


6.66 


6.80 


6.94 


7.08 


7.22 


7.37 


7.51 


7.65 


7.79 


7.93 


8.07 


8.22 


8.36 


8.50 



256 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Forty Major Municipal 
(Arranged in descending order 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 
for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Total 
revenue 
including 

street 
lighting 



Total 

consumption 

including 

street 

lighting 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-healers) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



>, Q. 2 

2 e s 



o a 



Av- 
erage 



Toronto (including Leaside) 
Hamilton 

<^Ottawa (including Eastview 
and RockcliffePark).., 

<^Sarnia 

<^North York Twp 

^Scarborough Twp 

^-Etobicoke Twp. (including 

Thistletown) 

<#London 

<$>Windsor 

St. Catharines 

<$>Oshawa 

Kitchener 

^York Twp 

^Toronto Twp 

Brantford 

Kingston 

Sudbury 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 

Fort William 

^-Oakville-Trafalgar 

<|>East York Twp 

^Guelph 

^-Burlington 

4'New Toronto 

Gait 

^-Belleville 

#Welland 

Chatham 

<^Woodstock 

Barrie 

^Trenton 

"^Niagara Falls 

Waterloo , 

^St. Thomas 

Stamford Twp 

Stratford 

North Bay 

Brockville 

^Port Credit 



38,384,770 
17,002,076 

10,832,687 

6,734,141 

10,841,730 

8,032.843 

7,463,658 
6,331,623 
4,494,476 
3,998,556 

3,010,226 
3,9.39,183 
3,553,519 
3,355,500 
2,248,113 

2,111,063 
2,602,347 
2,095,997 
1,831,495 
1,747,195 

2,056,905 
1,969,971 
2,020,180 
2,133,385 
1,245,685 

1,325,181 
1,068,049 
1,132,171 
1,527.603 
992,628 

915,705 
731,721 
1,028,324 
967,051 
989,711 

1,098,568 
946,606 
952,392 
755,351 
608,698 



kwh 
3,250,199,229 
2,100,667,422 

1,126,244,030 

1,019,666,335 

914.285,261 

685,257,748 

660,147,132 
555,360,956 
379,348,329 
374,622,903 

347,981,665 
338,522,966 
337,462,539 
326,427,529 
211,576,615 

209,726,765 
201,246,493 
199,341,233 
193,689,357 
195,799,146 

194,635.346 
183,126,856 
177,059,490 
154,079.458 
146.034.635 

114,654,816 
114,048,240 
99,676,958 
95,323,215 
92,152,321 

89,251,565 
87,252,146 
86,540,313 
85,539.394 
80,852,309 

80,120,377 
78,517,624 
77,144,219 
76,810,925 
75,511,666 



11,830,658 
4,297,694 

4,569,588 

791.016 

5,822,678 

4,407,534 

3,775,782 
2,667,911 
1,4.52,654 
1,158,619 

1,039,077 
1,610.110 
2,132,314 
1,302,395 
924,468 

874.999 
1,514,705 
920,886 
741,289 
764.672 

960.103 
1,255,592 

841,411 
1,3.58,779 

221,869 

534,009 
528.352 
307,154 
442,539 
433.243 

421,545 
230,906 
379,080 
422,876 
485,922 

589,814 
431.214 
469,730 
314,853 
158,716, 



kwh 
940,379,960 
374,629,912 

604,238,556 

59,377,748 

526,711,019 

377,773.701 

334,144,517 

210,709,716 

130,217,000 

88,860,619 

124,813,072 
141,380,951 
216,621,823 
112,783,690 
81,623,327 

95,578,469 
135,269,891 
87,629,081 
88,868,466 
97,349,419 

76,723,188 
120,512,228 
69.739.570 
99,5.50,774 
20.511,517 

45,854,742 
60,160,166 
21,675,682 
25,107,849 
38,984,284 

42,139,512 
24,179,338 
30,271,299 
41,623,351 
37,621,854 

45,689,665 
37,. 507.517 
40,7.30,856 
31,089,410 
15,021,429 



No. 

176,770 

71,760 

79,277 
14,657 
80,046 

61,744 

49,169 
49,150 
34,555 
23,462 

17,931 
22,665 
39,229 
15,711 
15,317 

13,661 
20,940 
13,339 
12,347 
12,192 

11,303 
22,537 
11,317 
13,203 
3,679 

8,079 
9,092 
9,969 
8,210 
6,500 

6,223 
3,929 
6,839 
6.030 
7,417 

8,423 
6,132 
6,426 
5.253 
2,650 



kwh 
443 
435 

635 
338 
555 

510 

566 
357 
314 

A20 

580 
520 
460 
598 
444 

583 
538 
547 
600 
665 

566 
446 
514 
628 
465 

473 
562 
300 
255 
500 

564 
513 
369 
575 
423 

452 
510 
528 
493 

472 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



257 



Electrical Utilities 
of total consumption) 

AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate 


water- heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












c ^ 


Av- 








il 


^ 


Av- 








■2 g 


erage 








•s II 


.2 £ 


erage 






Cus- 


>. a 2 
2 S - 


cost 






Cus- 


M '<r. 15 


:hly 
impi 
usto 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aver: 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 

consu 
per CI 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


^ 


9.354,387 


639.703.200 


26,472 


2,014 


1.46 


16,221,634 


1,620,656,199 


7,079 


429,811 


19.078 


1.00 


2,524,990 


205.591,072 


8,705 


1.968 


1.23 


9.789.585 


1,502.078.370 


1,359 


287,344 


92,107 


0.65 


5,433,430 


463.919.983 


11.142 


3.470 


1.17 


476.363 


44,520,891 


185 


15,781 


20,054 


1.07 


410,423 


27.998.628 


837 


2,788 


1.47 


5.459.092 


929,671,559 


175 


117,916 


442,701 


0.59 


2,998,533 


202.834,976 


4.624 


3,000 


1.48 


1.776.769 


171,135,266 


707 


57,583 


n,800 


1.04 


1,724,846 


133,269.681 


2,827 


3,928 


1.29 


1,610,826 


161,766,366 


333 


46,597 


40,482 


1.00 


1,314,587 


94,014.083 


2,135 


3,670 


1.40 


2,097.294 


220.668,070 


749 


59,374 


24,551 


0.95 


1,477.347 


112,551,013 


2,531 


3.706 


1.31 


2.016,601 


225.200,587 


522 


58,879 


35,952 


0.90 


877.032 


67,298,057 


1,979 


2.834 


1.30 


1,860,293 


171.565.072 


771 


61,732 


18,544 


1.08 


676.239 


40,267,388 


2,363 


1,700 


1.68 


2,058,230 


240.688,096 


315 


57,903 


70,000 


0.86 


440.810 


37.384,655 


1,643 


1,896 


1.18 


1,417,008 


180,514,938 


276 


45,076 


54,503 


0.78 


759.065 


48.707.942 


1.792 


2,265 


1.56 


1,445,286 


142,997.025 


367 


40,516 


32,470 


1.01 


564.404 


44.359,107 


1,294 


2,857 


1.27 


703,866 


70,818,409 


543 


23,576 


10.868 


0.99 


419,444 


29.209,982 


585 


4,161 


1.44 


1,529.753 


181,301,843 


195 


35,972 


77,479 


0.84 


408.032 


33,561,359 


1,572 


1.779 


1.22 


847.302 


93,241,249 


295 


30,010 


26,339 


0.91 


742.130 


64,066.882 


2,110 


2.530 


1.16 


428.949 


47,673,106 


234 


14,574 


16,978 


0.90 


755,580 


45,156.193 


2.080 


1,809 


1.67 


225,448 


17,290,881 


270 


7,117 


5,337 


1.30 


460,283 


29,602,029 


1,445 


1,707 


1.55 


630,187 


78,558,923 


259 


21,287 


25,276 


0.80 


463,010 


43,529,828 


1.655 


2,192 


1.06 


560,050 


63,111,463 


59 


23,849 


89,140 


0.89 


389.753 


38,644,251 


1.567 


2,055 


1.01 


490.213 


56,083,076 


214 


20,695 


21,839 


0.87 


293.127 


20,853.486 


490 


3,547 


1.41 


767.925 


95,900,360 


195 


17,577 


40,983 


0.80 


367,590 


30,546,227 


901 


2.825 


1.20 


265.768 


28,601,468 


91 


8,705 


26,192 


0:93 


353.165 


24,260,315 


1.019 


1.984 


1.46 


735,465 


80,333,045 


139 


20,963 


48,161 


0.92 


339,135 


20,500,185 


624 


2.738 


1.65 


413,707 


33,277,099 


145 


11,380 


19,125 


1.24 


143.111 


11,446,136 


245 


3,893 


1.25 


861,924 


113,407,782 


36 


24,640 


262,518 


0.76 


209,524 


12,317,721 


856 


1,199 


1.70 


525,849 


54,397,793 


223 


17,387 


20,328 


0.97 


269,521 


22.336.922 


698 


2,135 


1.21 


236,788 


29,869,164 


157 


8,666 


15,854 


0.79 


198,360 


12.692,835 


481 


1,900 


1.56 


583,223 


63,342,181 


185 


16,490 


30,000 


0.92 


451,349 


21.825,880 


1,204 


1,511 


2.07 


556,023 


45,429,486 


259 


15,289 


14,617 


1.22 


143,745 


10,495,487 


356 


2,457 


1.37 


377,285 


40,589,850 


139 


11,635 


24,334 


0.93 


253.765 


18.170,413 


870 


1,740 


1.40 


227,371 


28,018,240 


111 


8,816 


21,035 


0.81 


90,773 


7,188,497 


242 


2,475 


1.26 


388,585 


55,070,311 


78 


10,993 


58,836 


0.71 


361,010 


29,510,416 


546 


4,504 


1.22 


239,526 


24,707,878 


50 


7,338 


41,180 


0.97 


214,943 


13,870,167 


531 


2,177 


1.55 


282,114 


28,145,662 


79 


7,882 


29,690 


1.00 


177,055 


12,628,822 


403 


2,611 


1.40 


303,232 


29,787,217 


116 


8,869 


21.399 


1.02 


224,677 


10,996,681 


612 


1,497 


2.04 


234,123 


21,581,619 


106 


7,432 


16.967 


1.08 


202,676 


13,839,028 


683 


1,689 


1.46 


265,573 


25,159,519 


152 


8,973 


13,794 


1.06 


315,484 


22.850,734 


1,129 


1,687 


1.38 


139,830 


12,314,229 


130 


4.177 


7,894 


1.14 


153,639 


12,051.498 


734 


1,368 


1.27 


263,829 


32,875,737 


49 


8,933 


55.911 


0.80 


74.846 


5,526,392 


157 


2,933 


1.35 


361,206 


54,474,245 


11 


8,204 


412,684 


0.66 



258 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 






Peak 




load 




Decem- 


Total 


ber 


customers 


1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly 
consumption 
per customer 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


7.479.475 


1,209 


516 


819.280 


203 


336 


10.890.078 


2,015 


450 


4.346.124 


810 


447 


1,196.147 


278 


359 


5.301.851 


903 


489 


5.930.416 


1.017 


486 


436.476 


258 


141 


8.080.419 


1,290 


522 


8.191.066 


1,025 


666 


256.310 


96 


222 


984,140 


176 


466 


10,005,380 


1,634 


510 


2,173,470 


451 


402 


1,524,657 


350 


363 


13,483,136 


1,655 


65J, 


13,556,406 


2,468 


458 


466,210 


104 


374 


8,199.455 


1,393 


491 


1,731,447 


310 


465 


1,566,577 


264 


495 


1,270,500 


740 


143 


3.537.777 


640 


461 


42.139.512 


6,223 


564 


980,330 


383 


213 


1.127,574 


224 


419 


819.975 


200 


342 


1,520,363 


275 


461 


4.314,385 


766 


469 


1.276,700 


249 


427 


2,314,744 


519 


372 


1,292.480 


297 


363 


1.625.074 


638 


212 


60,160.166 


9,092 


562 


2,819.346 


1,050 


224 


5,495.300 


1,009 


454 


1.280.381 


294 


363 


1,354,296 


296 


381 


2,015,639 


615 


273 


4.007,731 


618 


540 



<#> Acton 

<i>Ailsa Craig 

<t>Ajax 

<^Alexandria 

^Alfred 

Alliston 

4' Almonte 

Alvinston 

# Amherstburg 

Ancaster Twp. (including 

Ancaster) 

Apple Hill 

<#>Arkona 

#Arnprior 

<!' Arthur 

<^ Athens 

^■Atikokan Twp 

#/ Aurora 

<#>Avonmore 

<^Aylmer 

Ayr 

#■ Baden 

^tBala 

Bancroft 

Barrie 

<f/Barry's Bay 

Bath 

#Beachburg 

#/Beachville 

Beamsviile 

#tBeardmore 

#Beaverton 

<*/Beeton 

^Belle River 

^^ Belleville 

# Blenheim 

<t>tBlind River 

'%'Bloomfield 

-^Blyth 

Bobcaygeon 

4 Bolton 



No. 
4.205 

549 
7,849 
2,486 

965 

2,948 

3,316 

626 

4,414 

13,397 

400 

497 

5,505 

1,256 

960 

6.918 
8.055 

248 
4,650 
1.024 



*457 

2,535 

21.610 

1.432 

699 

536 

836 

2.481 

1,137 

1,211 

830 

1.894 

29,162 

3.134 

3.940 

661 

737 

1.273 

2,074 



o. 


kw 


1,312 


4.278 


224 


392 


2.188 


6,169 


895 


2,173 


305 


561 


1.096 


2,305 


1,096 


1,918 


330 


282 


1,440 


3,398 


1,108 


2,698 


114 


101 


188 


363 


1,779 


4,244 


505 


815 


367 


493 


1,803 


3,794 


2.724 


6,240 


116 


200 


1,536 


4,939 


379 


686 


279 


890 


824 


363 


775 


1,443 


7,204 


19,342 


412 


440 


251 


397 


215 


329 


237 


2.195 


889 


1.689 


325 


503 


569 


1.234 


316 


553 


694 


751 


9,947 


24.913 


1,179 


1.748 


1.186 


2,094 


313 


454 


332 


772 


746 


859 


657 


1.421 



87,651 
10,216 
139,895 
43,837 
16,017 

56,900 

55,268 

7.688 

90,818 

106,276 

4,206 

13,537 

101,356 

25.792 

14,442 

165,890 

158,479 

7.794 

76.484 

19.572 

17.804 
31.700 
51,266 
421,545 
13,109 

15,791 
14.030 
17.320 
49,146 
20,234 

25.243 
17,823 
30.204 
528.352 
42.830 

86.011 
13.699 
16,231 
31,636 
55,211 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



259 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(incl 


uding flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












c fc 


Av- 








35 


^ 


Av- 








•2 1 


erage 








Average of 
tomers'mon 
loads billed 


.1 E 


erage 






Cus- 


>. c. 2 

2 i ^ 


cost 






Cus- 


hly 
impi 
usto 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
const 

oer ci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per 01 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


P 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


c 


24,606 


1,459.176 


70 


1,737 


1.69 


106.864 


8,675,730 


33 


2.932 


21,908 


1.23 


3.657 


217,197 


17 


1,065 


1.68 


4,538 


235,910 


4 


146 


4,915 


1.92 


36,089 


2,364,665 


106 


1,859 


1.53 


178,710 


15,704,820 


67 


5,058 


19,533 


1.14 


20,054 


1,401,574 


67 


1.743 


1.43 


31,258 


3,006,545 


18 


833 


13.919 


1.04 


4,555 


239,285 


17 


1.173 


1.90 


8.794 


608,110 


10 


287 


5.068 


1.45 


30.254 


1,746,897 


159 


916 


1.73 


29.331 


2,783,662 


34 


886 


6,823 


1.05 


14,556 


1,126.288 


55 


1.706 


1.29 


33,934 


3,902,419 


24 


1,189 


13,550 


0.87 


6,272 


292.796 


64 


381 


2.14 


2,081 


86,983 


8 


65 


906 


2..39 


37.648 


2,374,512 


116 


1.706 


1.59 


62.058 


5,630.540 


34 


1.681 


13,800 


1.10 


19,636 


819,864 


74 


923 


2.40 


6.091 


462.289 


9 


148 


4,280 


1.32 


1,257 
2.484 


59,660 


18 


276 


2.11 














150,261 


10 


1.252 


1.65 


3,187 


146,550 


2 


84 


6,106 


2.17 


42,814 


3,289,627 


124 


2,211 


1.30 


52,244 


4,751,256 


21 


1,649 


18,854 


1.10 


7.903 


427.436 


39 


913 


1.85 


5,641 


341.025 


15 


216 


1,895 


1.65 


2,617 


188,280 


15 


1,046 


1.39 


881 


55,200 


2 


46 


2,300 


1.60 


57.378 


3,654,426 


116 


2,625 


1.57 


18,147 


932,802 


32 


845 


2.429 


1.95 


68.813 


4,638,973 


211 


1,832 


1.48 


108.960 


8,834,630 


45 


2,867 


16.360 


1.23 


2,066 


108.025 


11 


818 


1.91 


958 


26,100 


1 


45 


2,175 


3.67 


43,010 


3,399,845 


111 


2,552 


1.27 


70,343 


6,854,016 


32 


2,341 


17,849 


1.03 


10,317 


623,554 


55 


945 


1.65 


10,784 


480,799 


14 


381 


2,862 


2.24 


2,600 


164,001 


10 


1,367 


1.59 


18,946 


1,448,230 


5 


602 


24,137 


1.31 


14,155 


658,000 


78 


703 


2.15 


942 


56,800 


6 


41 


789 


1.66 


30,116 


1,430,887 


121 


985 


2.10 


14,120 


1.058,364 


14 


439 


6,300 


1.33 


253,765 


18,170,413 


870 


1,740 


1.40 


227,371 


28,018,240 


111 


8,816 


21,035 


0.81 


5.234 


384,945 


25 


1,283 


1.36 


927 


72,870 


4 


31 


1,518 


1.27 


3,607 


171,180 


26 


549 


2.11 


666 


64,680 


1 


11 


5,390 


1.03 


1,949 


97,423 


10 


812 


2.00 


8.071 


495,770 


5 


203 


8,263 


1.63 


2,015 


110,552 


10 


921 


1.82 


86,584 


11,563,210 


2 


1,936 


481,800 


0.75 


21,020 


1,205,690 


110 


913 


1.74 


10,694 


655,780 


13 


349 


4,204 


1.63 


14,736 


804,500 


74 


906 


1.83 


147 


1,600 


2 


10 


67 


9.19 


10,811 


825,140 


37 


1,858 


1.31 


24,445 


1.928,233 


13 


916 


12.360 


1.27 


2,955 


130,845 


12 


909 


2.26 


5,034 


307,000 


7 


122 


3,655 


1.64 


15,690 


856,114 


51 


1,399 


1.83 


3,609 


239.308 


5 


99 


3,988 


1.51 


269,521 


22,336,922 


698 


2,135 


1.21 


236,788 


29,869,164 


157 


8,666 


15,854 


0.79 


33,658 


1,898,299 


103 


1.536 


1.77 


25,749 


1,407,845 


26 


808 


4,512 


1.83 


53.289 


3,059,100 


172 


1,482 


1.74 


15,036 


1.086,500 


5 


368 


18,108 


1..38 


3,054 


192,594 


13 


1,235 


1.59 


1,793 


41,857 


6 


128 


581 


4.28 


5,874 


365,798 


29 


1,051 


1.61 


13,381 


1,080,285 


7 


337 


12,861 


1.24 


15,837 


723,665 


122 


494 


2.19 


8,025 


376,610 


9 


272 


3.487 


2.13 


9,860 


522,511 


27 


1,613 


1.89 


5,625 


348,975 


12 


190 


2.423 


1.61 



260 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 





Peak 






load 




Decem- 


Total 


ber 


customers 


1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



>. a 2 



Av- 
erage 



per 
kwh 



<t>Bothwell 

<$>Bowmanville . . 
Bracebridge . . . 

^Bradford 

<^Braeside 

#Brampton 

Brantford 

^Brantford Twp 

<$>Brechin 

<^Bridgeport . . . . 

<t>Brigden 

<#Brighton 

Brockville 

<#>Brussels 

#>Burford 

Burgessville . . . 
^Burk's Falls . . . 
^Burlington . . . . 
^Cache Bay 

Caledonia 

#Campbellford . . 
Campbellville . . 

Cannington 

Capreol 

<#>Cardinal 

#Carleton Place. 

#>Casselman 

<#>Cayuga 

#>Chalk River. . . 
Chapleau Twp. 

Chatham 

<#>Chatsworth.... 

Chesley 

<$>Chesterville . . . 

Chippawa 

^Clifford 

#CIinton 

^tCobalt 

#Cobden 

#Cobourg 



No. 

825 
7,242 
2,970 
2,358 

530 

19,185 
54,425 

7,824 
272 

1,695 

513 

2,427 

17,690 

853 

1,080 

260 

914 

46,374 

896 

2,265 

3,428 
216 
1,024 
2,937 
1,991 

4,699 
1,331 
910 
1,062 
3,742 

29,332 

407 

1.650 

1,252 

3,182 

559 
3,227 
2,070 

878 
9,556 



No 


kw 


330 


467 


2,471 


6,544 


1.155 


238 


833 


2,044 


162 


1,634 


6,135 


17,471 


17,184 


45,208 


2,298 


5,854 


100 


176 


461 


930 


212 


248 


1,001 


1,604 


6,036 


16.453 


377 


688 


411 


864 


100 


225 


350 


724 


13,972 


36,335 


201 


319 


820 


1,204 


1,357 


953 


93 


171 


450 


764 


995 


2,110 


666 


1,042 


1,737 


3,378 


384 


745 


374 


520 


291 


553 


991 


408 


9,673 


21,188 


169 


334 


732 


1.260 


457 


1.585 


1,049 


1,595 


225 


378 


1,246 


2,483 


763 


1,099 


395 


733 


3,515 


10,008 



$ 

11.184 

132.679 

65,142 

49,547 

7,390 

438,954 

924,468 

258,144 

3.710 

33,596 

5,944 

49,669 

314,853 

20,697 

30.266 

5,800 

19,241 

1,358,779 

8,895 

30,028 

67,507 
7,045 
22,403 
83,930 
35,376 

101,932 
22,699 
13,576 
16.939 
92,559 

442,539 

8,358 

33,191 

22,538 

58,024 

13,122 
76,905 
45,803 
16,413 
195.359 



kwh 

853.501 

14,012,898 

5,239,600 

4,435,716 

574.229 

34,686,625 

81,623,327 

16,481,272 

347,135 

2,812,039 

425,130 

4,685,532 

31,089,410 

1,703,303 

2,330,353 

476,024 

1,372,820 

99,550,774 

476,349 

2,264,222 

7,161.131 
517,954 
1,891,505 
5,885,608 
3,253,753 

8,141,636 
1,617,751 
1,013,421 
1,551,667 
1,787.715 

25.107,849 

700,530 

2,963,765 

2,063.148 

4.126.313 

1,075.010 
6,308.764 
2.885,500 
1,913,896 
19,256,801 



No. 

287 

2.285 

928 

720 

154 

5.718 

15,317 

2,137 

85 

431 

181 
920 
5,253 
337 
367 

77 

318 

13,203 

195 

679 

1,198 

85 

373 

897 

627 

1,621 
358 
322 
275 
859 

8,210 
147 
600 
413 
952 

205 

1,111 

638 

364 

3,187 



kwh 
262 
511 
471 
513 
311 

506 
444 
643 
340 

544 

196 
424 
493 
i62 
529 

515 
360 
628 
204 
278 

498 
508 
423 
547 
432 

419 
377 
262 
470 
173 

255 
397 
412 
416 
361 

437 
473 
377 
438 
504 



i 

1.31 

0.95 

1.24 

1.12 

1.29 

1.27 
1.13 
1.57 
1.07 
1.19 

1.40 
1.06 
1.01 
1.22 
1.30 

1.22 
1.40 
1.36 
1.87 
1.33 

0.94 
1.36 
1.18 
1.43 
1.09 

1.25 
1.40 
1.34 
1.09 
5.18 

1.76 
1.19 
1.12 
1.09 
1.41 

1.22 
1.22 
1.59 
0.86 
1.01 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



261 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate 


water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


service 












^ . 


Av- 








to >> 

35 


, 


Av- 








'+j S 


erage 








•o g-S 


•1 E 


erage 






Cus- 


>. a S 
2 5 2^ 


cost 






Cus- 


ige 

-s'm 
bill 


hly 
mpi 
isto 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
perci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aven 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


i 


7,896 


579,698 


32 


1,006 


1.36 


4,451 


121,520 


11 


199 


921 


3.66 


50.523 


4,393,547 


147 


2,491 


1.15 


79,085 


9,216.168 


39 


2,771 


19,693 


0.86 


47,863 


3,358,036 


205 


1,365 


1.43 


10,656 


659.592 


22 


412 


2,498 


1.62 


25,569 


1,558,223 


82 


1,584 


1.64 


25,822 


2,292,455 


31 


785 


6,163 


1.13 


658 


41,680 


6 


579 


1.58 


54,266 


5,753,030 


2 


1,516 


239,710 


0.94 


176,702 


11,862,546 


320 


3,089 


1.49 


246,171 


21,822.956 


97 


6,667 


18.748 


1.13 


408,032 


33,561,359 


1,572 


1,779 


1.22 


847.302 


93,241,249 


295 


30,010 


26,339 


0.91 


46,597 


2,636,719 


114 


1.927 


1.77 


102,080 


6,901,516 


47 


3,032 


12,237 


1.48 


2,362 


182,350 


14 


1,085 


1.30 


498 


18,816 


1 


26 


1,568 


2.65 


7,925 


545,841 


21 


2,166 


1.45 


5,342 


352,535 


9 


193 


3,264 


1.52 


4,938 


299,140 


23 


1,084 


1.65 


3,541 


135,575 


8 


154 


1,412 


2.61 


17,782 


1,188,699 


70 


1,415 


1.50 


7,302 


548,651 


11 


277 


4,156 


1.33 


153.639 


12,051.498 


734 


1,368 


1.27 


263,829 


32.875.737 


49 


8,933 


55,911 


0.80 


9,016 


503,085 


31 


687 


1.79 


7,253 


362,032 


9 


189 


3,352 


2.00 


10,259 


555,858 


37 


1,252 


1.85 


4,874 


271,395 


7 


157 


3,231 


1.80 


2,742 


136,327 


20 


568 


2.01 


2,738 


55,210 


3 


96 


1,534 


4.96 


8,858 


506,890 


28 


1.509 


1.75 


9,750 


667,340 


4 


237 


13,903 


1.46 


339,135 


20,500,185 


624 


2,738 


1.65 


413,707 


33,277,099 


145 


11,380 


19,125 


1.24 


562 


19,170 


3 


533 


2.93 


18,726 


825,256 


3 


427 


22,924 


2.27 


21,743 


1,393,188 


116 


1,001 


1.56 


11,468 


778,503 


25 


329 


2,595 


1.47 


29,243 


2,514,039 


135 


1,552 


1.16 


17,295 


1,834,759 


24 


643 


6,371 


0.94 


1,104 


71,260 


7 


848 


1.55 


608 


59,300 


1 


10 


4,942 


1.03 


8,453 


420,021 


66 


530 


2.01 


5,572 


294,660 


11 


166 


2,232 


1.89 


18,297 


1,128,447 


95 


990 


1.62 


12,751 


1,197,170 


3 


279 


33,255 


1.07 


7,766 


517,190 


34 


1,268 


1.50 


1,478 


119,640 


5 


47 


1,994 


1.23 


27,850 


1,500,118 


88 


1,421 


1.86 


44,162 


4,211,526 


28 


1,283 


12,534 


1.05 


6,907 


359.115 


20 


1,496 


1.92 


11,632 


727,615 


6 


333 


10,106 


1.60 


9,978 


624,413 


41 


1,269 


1.60 


4,505 


132,845 


11 


212 


1,006 


3.39 


4,268 


334,758 


14 


1,993 


1.27 


2,801 


253,150 


2 


94 


10.548 


1.11 


44,337 


746,434 


112 


555 


5.95 


15,679 


458,422 


20 


186 


1,910 


3.42 


451,349 


21,825,880 


1,204 


1,511 


2.07 


556,023 


45,429,486 


259 


15,289 


14,617 


1.22 


4,236 


255,440 


21 


1,014 


1.66 


773 


33,075 


1 


23 


2,756 


2.34 


15,845 


872,306 


106 


686 


1.82 


11,478 


723,042 


26 


426 


2,317 


1.59 


7,430 


497,220 


34 


1,219 


1.49 


38,312 


3,875,640 


10 


1,047 


32,297 


0.99 


18,989 


984,648 


85 


965 


1.93 


5,118 


542,502 


12 


159 


3,767 


0.94 


3,213 


207,592 


14 


1,236 


1.55 


4,120 


313,250 


6 


105 


4,351 


1.32 


32,054 


2,003,145 


108 


1,546 


1.60 


24,603 


1,788,256 


27 


699 


5,519 


1.38 


20,025 


1,058,300 


119 


741 


1.89 


9,746 


811,400 


6 


213 


11.269 


1.20 


6,615 


498,039 


25 


1,660 


1.33 


3,432 


179,340 


6 


194 


2.491 


1.91 


69,985 


5,360,645 


255 


1,752 


1.31 


170,081 


19,984,525 


73 


5.732 


22.813 


0.85 



262 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
customers 



Peak 
load 
Decem- 
ber 
1961 



Residential service 

(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



■B E 

>. a o 

o c >- 

5 O a^ 

<: (J D. 



Av- 
erage 
cost 
per 



Cochrane , 

Colborne 

■^Coldwater 

^Collingwood 

<i>Comber , 

^-Coniston 

•#Cook;stown 

#>Cottam 

<t'Courtright 

Creemore 

<^>Dash\vood 

^Deep River 

Delaware 

#Delhi 

#>Deseronto 

<^> Dorchester 

#Drayton 

<#> Dresden 

^■Drumbo 

#Dryden 

#Dublin 

#>DundaIk 

Dundas 

#Dunnville 

Durham 

^•Dutton 

<#'East York Twp. . . 

Eganville 

#>tElk Lake Townsite 
<t>Elmira 

#EImvale 

#Elmwood 

Elora 

Embro 

<f tEnglehart 

<^Erieau 

#Erie Beach 

<#.Erin 

<^Espanola 

<f' Essex 



No. 
4,459 
1,357 

750 

8,134 

583 

2,680 
643 
659 
549 

877 

416 
5,365 

409 
3,447 
1,785 

914 
633 

2,245 
400 

6,147 

275 

902 

13,253 

5,343 

2,101 

803 

69,627 

1,451 

§650 

3,284 

938 
§450 
1,493 

542 
1,685 

487 

♦154 

1,021 

5,222 

3,412 



No. 

1,320 
578 
274 

3,114 
234 

673 
250 
246 
195 
364 

184 
1,447 

135 
1,411 

625 

333 
275 
903 
171 
1,790 

116 

437 

4,208 

1,959 

849 

347 

23,529 

566 

225 

1,177 

404 
135 
541 
234 
623 

359 

135 

412 

1,341 

1,220 



kw 

2,842 

1,144 

631 
6,664 

332 

1,278 
389 
290 
196 
610 

308 
4,196 

250 
3,004 
1,039 

562 
458 

1,290 
275 

3.454 

290 

715 

9,867 

3,875 

1.593 

474 

42,905 

638 

450 

3,990 

699 
210 
884 
461 
1,103 

366 
63 

675 
2.639 
1,831 



92.633 

30.717 

14.640 

141.681 

8.205 

54.094 

12,473 

9.553 

6.596 

17.494 

11.637 
133.765 
10,918 
61,242 
30,464 

16,165 

15,178 

33,231 

9,689 

135,153 

6,029 

19,320 

239,708 

66,172 

41,531 

12.403 
1.255.592 
28.334 
11,420 
77,132 

20,819 
4,859 
35,020 
13,568 
39,628 

12,968 

4,591 

22,848 

121,171 

49,554 



kwh 


No. 


7,105,490 


1,107 


2.574,539 


476 


1.366.260 


253 


13.878.739 


2,868 


515,390 


201 


4,152.186 


655 


1.079,895 


229 


711.994 


221 


455,174 


179 


1.544.620 


303 


743.671 


174 


11,511.498 


1,311 


762.755 


118 


5.376.570 


1,231 


2.780,739 


583 


1,281,691 


315 


1,012,555 


249 


2,149,799 


811 


811,701 


159 


10,742,771 


1.659 


528,572 


102 


1.554.900 


385 


20.708.148 


3.718 


4,496.707 


1.728 


3,442.073 


702 


885,851 


318 


120.512.228 


22.537 


1.855.922 


465 


729.600 


162 


6.636.725 


1,070 


1.856.115 


365 


393.030 


125 


2,339.431 


463 


1.115,308 


188 


2,430,800 


517 


992.204 


324 


168,480 


129 


1,832,585 


372 


8,056,899 


1,253 


3,494,850 


1,081 



kwh 
535 
451 
450 
403 
214 

528 
393 
268 
212 
425 

356 
732 
539 
364 
397 

339 
339 
221 
425 
540 

432 
337 

464 
218 
409 

232 
446 
333 
375 
517 

424 
262 
421 
494 
392 

255 
109 
411 
536 



For explanation of symbols see page 2' 



Statement D 



26.'J 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 



(incl 


Commercial 
uding flat-rate 


SERVICE 

water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












= . 


Av- 








it 


c in 


Av- 






Cus- 


;hly 

imptio 

Listom< 


erage 
cost 






Cus- 


ige of 
rs'mon 
billed 


hly 

imptio 

jstomt 


erage 
cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
perci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aven 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per c\ 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


f^ 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwi. 


i 


59.870 


3.187,119 


189 


1,405 


1.88 


20,185 


1,674,682 


24 


551 


5.815 


1.21 


15,792 


753.881 


93 


676 


2.09 


5,879 


393,067 


9 


158 


3.640 


1.50 


3,704 


237.601 


16 


1,238 


1.56 


8,455 


708,848 


5 


289 


11,814 


1.19 


64,125 


4.744.420 


180 


2,196 


1.35 


91,786 


8,744,324 


66 


3.324 


11,041 


1.05 


5,210 


266.945 


25 


890 


1.95 


7,001 


277,230 


8 


239 


2,888 


2.53 


6,045 


316.310 


15 


1.757 


1.91 


1,372 


91,160 


3 


38 


2,532 


1.50 


2,492 


127.210 


16 


663 


1.96 


2,409 


114,770 


5 


90 


1,913 


2.10 


3,282 


169.580 


18 


785 


1.94 


3,868 


85,900 


7 


203 


1,023 


4.50 


2,217 


143.869 


14 


856 


1.54 


698 


62,204 


2 


18 


2,592 


1.12 


7.089 


375.230 


55 


569 


1.89 


2,644 


140,850 


6 


111 


1,956 


1.88 


1,335 


65,150 


6 


905 


2.05 


3,593 


130,950 


4 


125 


2,728 


2.74 


58.092 


3,892,245 


127 


2,554 


1.49 


10,139 


941,620 


9 


238 


8,719 


1.08 


3,275 


132,044 
2,884,954 


17 


647 


2.48 














46,001 


139 


1,730 


1.59 


36,558 


2,474,242 


41 


1,289 


5,029 


1.48 


6.436 


439,062 


24 


1,525 


1.47 


16,093 


1,115,214 


18 


632 


5,163 


1.44 


2,365 


117,134 


14 


697 


2.02 


4,537 


250,426 


4 


158 


5,217 


1.81 


3,413 


170,235 


22 


645 


2.01 


3,612 


140,853 


4 


114 


2,934 


2.56 


19,688 


1,150.060 


62 


1,546 


1.71 


44,427 


2,869,370 


30 


1,298 


7,970 


1.55 


1,230 


62,450 


9 


578 


1.97 


1,656 


45,830 


3 


73 


1,273 


3.61 


65,508 


4,176.876 


126 


2,762 


1.57 


4,083 


261,500 


5 


115 


4,358 


1.56 


3.356 


242,397 


12 


1,683 


1.38 


4,618 


176,500 


2 


121 


7,354 


2.62 


8,841 


452,053 


39 


966 


1.96 


6,140 


310,718 


13 


245 


1,992 


1.98 


143,473 


8,979,855 


406 


1.843 


1.60 


98,590 


8,198,217 


84 


3,545 


8,133 


1.20 


49.907 


3,254,216 


191 


1,363 


1.53 


88.257 


7.754.192 


40 


2,450 


16,155 


1.14 


20.036 


1,065,080 


123 


722 


1.88 


30,945 


1,631,531 


24 


980 


5,665 


1.90 


3.916 


232,387 


16 


1,210 


1.69 


7.049 


483,297 


13 


249 


3,098 


1.46 


367.590 


30,546,227 


901 


2.825 


1.20 


265.768 


28,601,468 


91 


8,705 


26,192 


0.93 


22.705 


988,865 


91 


906 


2.30 


8,410 


566,471 


10 


223 


4,721 


1.48 


7.106 


438,500 


61 


599 


1.62 


7.749 


222,400 


2 


263 


9,267 


3.48 


30.023 


1,842,746 


74 


2.075 


1.63 


88,643 


8,096,298 


33 


2.294 


20,445 


1.09 


7.630 


487,318 


31 


1.310 


1.57 


2,094 


159,429 


8 


74 


1,661 


1.31 


1.217 


80,220 


9 


743 


1.52 


2,881 


97,200 


1 


121 


8,100 


2.96 


11,772 


526,933 


72 


610 


2.23 


7,345 


470,140 


6 


209 


6,530 


1.56 


4,032 


271.635 


42 


539 


1.48 


4,431 


184.417 


4 


109 


3,842 


2.40 


19,597 


957.900 


102 


783 


2.05 


6,865 


627.300 


4 


162 


13,069 


1.09 


7,141 


493,900 


29 


1.419 


1.45 


6,881 


263.755 


6 


235 


3,663 


2.61 


426 


13,403 
432,120 


6 


186 


3.18 














7,065 


33 


1.091 


1.63 


3,653 


185.980 


7 


153 


2,214 


1.96 


40,127 


2,449,230 


86 


2.373 


1.64 


406 


10.100 


2 


22 


421 


4.02 


39,166 


2,451,539 


107 


1,909 


1.60 


20,186 


1.032,090 


32 


777 


2.688 


1.96 



264 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 





Peak 






load 




Decem- 


Total 


ber 


customers 


1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue Consumption 

I 





y 

ption 
tomer 


Cus- 


onthl 
nsum 
reus 


tomers 




S 8 K 



#Etobicoke Twp. (including 
Thistletown) 

Exeter 

Fergus 

#Finch 

•^Flesherton 

Fonthill 

<#>Forest 

#Forest Hill 

Fort William 

#Frankford 

Gait 

^Georgetown 

#'tGeraldton 

<t>Glencoe 

#Goderich 

^tGogama 

Grand Bend 

Grand Valley 

Granton 

#Gravenhurst 

Grimsby 

#Guelph 

Hagersville 

^-tHaileybury 

Hamilton 

Hanover 

•^Harriston 

<t>Harrow 

^Hastings 

#Havelock 

<$>Hawkesbury 

#Hearst 

Hensall 

•t'tHepworth 

Hespeler 

Highgate 

Holstein 

tHornepayne 

^tHudson Townsite 

Huntsville 



No. 

152,204 

3,012 

3,928 

382 

523 

2,404 

2,134 

20,266 

44,871 

1,602 

27.367 

10,311 

3,590 

1,139 

6,360 

§500 
*874 
697 
291 
3,177 

5,155 

39,011 

2,066 

2,631 

264,130 

4,378 
1,632 
1,729 
894 
1,277 

8,583 

2,366 

927 

343 

4,546 

385 

179 

§1,400 

§600 

3,120 



v'o. 


kw 


52,053 


136,970 


1,258 


2.424 


1,373 


3,791 


178 


278 


255 


489 


801 


1,425 


917 


1.595 


7,922 


15,288 


13,973 


37,395 


599 


927 


9,158 


25,058 


3.322 


8,787 


1,097 


1.539 


486 


643 


2.399 


6,377 


140 


260 


834 


632 


324 


569 


122 


133 


1.351 


2.468 


1.871 


3.454 


12,475 


34,990 


773 


1,781 


903 


1,680 


81,824 


368,668 


1,624 


4,232 


676 


1,358 


689 


1,366 


448 


518 


468 


660 


2,176 


3.838 


713 


1,489 


365 


791 


127 


180 


1,469 


5,630 


164 


218 


96 


135 


483 


761 


211 


667 


1,216 


2,577 



3,775.782 

77.260 

95.617 

8,927 

9,228 

51,836 

45,309 

563,677 

764,672 

30,841 

534,009 

215,463 

71,588 

14,381 

139.005 

11,990 
38,454 
15,003 
6,462 
56.606 

78.764 

84L411 

28.593 

67.502 

4,297,694 

83,898 
36,205 
43,183 
16,607 
22,845 

136,310 

54,634 

18,883 

6,795 

73,466 

4,367 
3,670 

48,792 
9.875 

66,614 



kwh 

334,144,517 

5,887,116 

7.170,130 

735.028 

996.003 

4.145,871 

4,572,880 

55.693,040 

97,349,419 

2,813,241 

45,854,742 

18,089.482 

4,245,600 

1,184,255 

11,682,322 

429,600 
1,888,670 
1,103,290 

392,233 
6.220,934 

6,822.826 

69.739,570 

2,208,369 

4,730,000 

374,629,912 

8,009.299 
2,935,853 
3,737,815 
1,499,042 
1,744,436 

10,233,367 

2,912,530 

1,635,255 

403,700 

5,730,278 

317,378 
298,920 

1,949,845 
463,000 

5,919,964 



No. 

49,169 

1,041 

1,193 

166 

228 

716 

842 

7,486 

12,192 

561 

8,079 

3,095 

903 

421 

2,186 

120 

706 

255 

97 

1,212 

1,581 

11,317 

600 

732 

71,760 

1.399 
612 
591 
426 
435 

2,044 
631 
288 
112 

1,308 

125 
77 
426 
17 
979 



kwh 



566 
471 
501 
369 
364 

483 
453 
620 
665 
418 

473 
487 
392 
234 

445 

298 
223 
361 
337 
428 

360 
514 
307 
538 
435 

477 
400 
527 
293 
334 

417 
385 
473 
300 
365 

212 
324 
381 
218 
504 



lM)r explanation of symbols see page 276 



Stnlemeiit I) 



265 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate 


water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












c fc 


Av- 








3:5 


, 


Av- 








•2 E 


erage 








o i-g 


1 1 


erage 






Cus- 


>. Q. 2 

2 E -A 


cost 






Cus- 


Average 
tomers'm 
loads bill 


hly 
impi 
usto 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mom 
const 
perc 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per CI 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


P 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


i 


1,314,587 


94,014.083 


2,135 


3,670 


1.40 


2,097,294 


220,668,070 


749 


59,374 


24,551 


0.95 


31.803 


1,798,390 


183 


819 


1.77 


28,534 


1,612,577 


34 


945 


3,952 


1.77 


33,681 


1,704,080 


150 


947 


1.98 


71,333 


5,360,075 


30 


2,048 


14,889 


1.33 


1,744 


89.970 


7 


1.071 


1.94 


2,932 


116,075 


5 


126 


1,935 


2.53 


4,560 


327,332 


25 


1,091 


1.39 


1,553 


110,540 


2 


65 


4,606 


1.40 


- 14,344 


795,357 


74 


896 


1.80 


4,372 


200.440 


11 


134 


1,518 


2.18 


16,649 


1,171,164 


51 


1,914 


1.42 


11,273 


1.002,221 


24 


404 


3,480 


1.12 


171,837 


14.158,900 


409 


2,885 


1.21 


10,674 


1,202,720 


27 


344 


3,712 


0.89 


389,753 


38.644.251 


1,567 


2,055 


1.01 


490.213 


56.083.076 


214 


20,695 


21,839 


0.87 


4,754 


312.523 


32 


814 


1.52 


2.280 


203.005 


6 


92 


2,820 


1.12 


209,524 


12.317.721 


856 


1,199 


1.70 


525,849 


54.397,793 


223 


17,387 


20.328 


0.97 


62,902 


4.057,366 


183 


1,848 


1.55 


147,950 


17,261.414 


44 


3,923 


32,692 


0.86 


39,747 


2,282,400 


178 


1,069 


1.74 


2,418 


89,500 


16 


72 


466 


2.70 


13,810 


927,775 


51 


1,516 


1.49 


7,993 


284,005 


14 


356 


1,691 


2.81 


45,110 


2,739,774 


148 


1,543 


1.65 


156,552 


13,541,063 


65 


4,408 


17,360 


1.16 


4,313 


131,900 


19 


579 


3.27 


5,738 


295,100 


1 


77 


24,592 


1.94 


29,731 
7,195 


1,292,715 
347,710 


128 


842 


2.30 














60 


483 


2.07 


4,890 


229,720 


9 


210 


2,127 


2.13 


1,490 


57,056 


24 


198 


2.61 


147 


480 


1 


8 


40 




28,706 


2,491,650 


109 


1,905 


1.15 


24,949 


2,418,814 


30 


973 


6,719 


1.03 


49,899 


3,220,128 


251 


1,069 


1.55 


30,063 


2.648,185 


39 


967 


5,659 


1.14 


353,165 


24,260,315 


1.019 


1,984 


1.46 


735,465 


80,333,045 


139 


20.963 


48,161 


0.92 


27,904 


1,652.370 


147 


937 


1.69 


37.133 


2,116,130 


26 


1.423 


6,782 


1.75 


39,175 


2,020,700 


162 


1,039 


1.94 


4,921 


389,300 


9 


167 


3,605 


1.26 


2,524,990 


205,591,072 


8.705 


1.968 


1.23 


9,789,585 


1,502,078,370 


1.359 


287.344 


92,107 


0.65 


31,964 


2,106,576 


186 


944 


1.52 


61,126 


5,682,818 


39 


2.257 


12,143 


1.08 


12,175 


694,587 


49 


1,181 


1.75 


23,021 


2,010,678 


15 


632 


11,170 


1.14 


23,114 


1,371,725 


85 


1,345 


1.69 


17,356 


820,140 


13 


596 


5,257 


2.12 


2,861 


215,260 


18 


997 


1.33 


2,551 


141,442 


4 


109 


2,947 


1.80 


7,947 


510.323 


30 


1.418 


1.56 


2,088 


152,415 


3 


66 


4.234 


1.37 


65,994 


3,699.826 


106 


2.909 


1.78 


12,964 


915,287 


26 


489 


2,934 


1.42 


28.402 


1.379,410 


70 


1,642 


2.06 


10,107 


491,287 


12 


265 


3,412 


2.06 


10,290 


556,252 


56 


828 


1.85 


15,332 


834,090 


21 


502 


3,310 


1.84 


2,956 
25,279 


152,500 
1,434,939 


15 


847 


1.94 














126 


949 


1.76 


157,963 


18,407,810 


35 


4,747 


43,828 


0.86 


3.330 


165,510 


35 


394 


2.01 


4,661 


166.830 


4 


137 


3.476 


2.79 


1,000 


51,350 


17 


252 


1.95 


977 


67,100 


2 


20 


2.796 


1.46 


24,628 


689,273 


56 


1,026 


3.57 


8,576 


748,800 


1 


112 


62,400 


1.15 


5,408 


271,500 


31 


730 


1.99 


19,205 


810,500 


3 


416 


22,514 


2.37 


57,742 


3,685,331 


203 


1,513 


1.57 


14.853 


1.163,520 


34 


552 


2,852 


1.28 



266 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 






Peak 




load 




Decem- 


Total 


ber 


customers 


1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 





y 

ption 
tomer 


Cus- 


X E Z: 


tomers 


1 ^.t 




2 8^ 



Ingersoll 

#Iroquois 

#Jarvis 

<t>tJellicoe Townsite 

#Kapuskasing 

#>tKeams Townsite 

#>Kemptville 

#>Killaloe Station 

t>Kincardine 

#tKing Kirkland Townsite . 

Kingston 

^Kingsville 

#Kirkfield 

^tKirkland Lake (including 

Swastika ) 

Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lambeth 

^Lanark 

^Lancaster 

Larder Lake Twp 

#Latchford 

#Leamington 

#Lindsay 

<i>Listowel 

#London 

^Long Branch 

#L*Orignal 

't'Lucan 

Lucknow 

<$>Lynden 

•^-Madoc 

-^-Magnetawan 

Markdale 

♦xMarkham 

%-Marmora 

<#-Martintown 

'^'Massey 

^tMatachewan Twp 

4 tMatheson 

^tMattawa 



No. 

7,283 

1,091 

762 

§180 

6,794 

500 
1,938 

897 
2,851 
§500 

48,432 

3,040 

178 

§18,500 
74,522 

2.127 

2,025 

900 

597 

2,007 

483 

8,930 

11,119 

3,915 

161,554 

10,814 

1,206 

932 

1,008 

527 

1,485 
254 
1.107 
4.584 
1,302 

430 

1,328 

934 

916 

3,235 



No. 


kw 


2,336 


5.314 


393 


924 


279 


419 


62 


72 


2,189 


4,070 


194 


342 


768 


1,807 


293 


350 


1,247 


2,268 


192 


283 


16,005 


43,527 


1,261 


2.238 


106 


107 


5,946 


10.170 


24,824 


71,824 


766 


1,529 


622 


1,220 


286 


384 


207 


321 


572 


1,033 


145 


160 


3,323 


6.749 


3,945 


9,414 


1,601 


3,509 


52.203 


118.268 


4.270 


7.506 


377 


451 


361 


725 


466 


747 


170 


361 


597 


1.011 


107 


98 


455 


850 


1,421 


3.635 


521 


825 


125 


179 


364 


474 


303 


272 


318 


665 


831 


1,452 



119,116 

27,494 

12,513 

2,883 

123,779 

14,593 
42,946 
16,693 
56,219 
12,946 

874,999 

46.560 

4,934 

367,245 
1,610,110 

37,829 
46,766 
10.653 
8.741 
40.830 

5,329 

144,513 

206,751 

86,113 

2,667,911 

240,764 
20,671 
24,239 
17,386 
11,282 

25,816 

5,821 

19,346 

111,161 

26,314 

5,370 
29,490 
13,668 
20,764 
64,696 



kwh 

8,093,986 

2,253,628 

809,875 

152.192 

10,522,537 

961,800 
3,850,859 

865,000 
5,474,851 

825,184 

95,578,469 

4,281,458 

312,460 

23,766,300 
141,380,951 

3,806,962 
3,392,183 
1,047,580 
814,492 
3,248,155 

345,370 

11,235,339 

19,278.905 

7,602.317 

210,709,716 

20,574,187 

1,327,954 

1,857,977 

1,524,844 

947,223 

2.562,984 
291,990 
1.783,607 
8,665,369 
2,134,388 

424,980 
1,602,320 

788,231 
1,513,900 
3,353,700 



No. 


kwh 


2,035 


331 


338 


561 


255 


265 


49 


259 


1,969 


445 


181 


443 


709 


453 


271 


266 


1,124 


406 


170 


405 


13.661 


583 


1,106 


323 


99 


263 


5,012 


395 


22,665 


520 


638 


497 


578 


489 


268 


326 


190 


357 


520 


521 


137 


210 


3,008 


311 


3,602 


446 


1,447 


438 


49,150 


357 


4,075 


421 


356 


311 


338 


458 


361 


352 


162 


487 


525 


407 


103 


236 


356 


418 


1,307 


552 


482 


38i 


109 


325 


323 


413 


260 


253 


249 


507 


705 


396 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



267 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


service 












c fc 


Av- 










c i 


Av- 








.9 E 


erage 








i-s 


•B E 


erage 






Cus- 


>. a 2 
2 E i 


cost 






Cus- 


Average 
tomers'm 
loads bill 


>. a 2 
S E i 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 

kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


P 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


c 


59,858 


3,367,865 


253 


1,109 


1.78 


133,008 


12,786,446 


48 


4,024 


22,199 


1.04 


16,128 


985,235 


51 


1,520 


1.64 


3,816 


281.061 


4 


126 


5,855 


1.36 


4,425 


228,900 


16 


1,192 


1.93 


7.188 


446.137 


8 


202 


4,647 


1.61 


2,168 


126,373 


12 


878 


1.72 


206 


3,700 


1 


9 


308 


5.57 


70,582 


4,348,818 


188 


1,928 


1.62 


9,788 


624,419 


32 


398 


1,626 


1.57 


2,657 


162,700 


12 


1,130 


1.63 


550 


27,600 


1 


15 


2,300 


1.99 


26,140 


1,943,151 


48 


3.374 


1.35 


21.026 


1,455,970 


11 


692 


11,030 


1.44 


5,763 


268.172 


20 


1.117 


2.15 


1,122 


70,630 


2 


34 


2,943 


1.59 


24,681 


1,539,176 


100 


1,283 


1.60 


41,921 


3,203,160 


23 


1,231 


11,606 


1.31 


3,613 
742,130 


230,914 
64,066,882 


22 


875 


1.56 














2,110 


2,530 


1.16 


428,949 


47,673,106 


234 


14,574 


16,978 


0.90 


28,707 


1,844,327 


120 


1,281 


1.56 


24,575 


1,521,805 


35 


1,087 


3,623 


1.61 


913 


31,430 
12,645.720 


7 


374 


2.90 














200,461 


905 


1,164 


1.59 


50,689 


4,839,200 


29 


958 


13,906 


1.05 


759,065 


48,707,942 


1,792 


2,265 


1.56 


1,445,286 


142,997,025 


367 


40,516 


32,470 


1.01 


21,338 


1,347,100 


110 


1,021 


1.58 


8,710 


581,695 


18 


361 


2,693 


1.50 


8,613 


383,896 


43 


744 


2.24 


1,475 


73,675 


1 


26 


6,140 


2.00 


2,526 


191,240 


15 


1,062 


1.32 


2,977 


221,920 


3 


111 


6,164 


1.34 


4,348 
10,950 


331,585 
587,835 


17 


1,625 
1,000 


1.31 














49 


1.86 


1,682 


179,100 


3 


31 


4,975 


0.94 


2,115 


147,190 


7 


1,752 


1.44 


5,248 


374,141 


1 


154 


31,178 


1.40 


87,853 


5,666,617 


235 


2,009 


1.55 


138,340 


12,348,646 


80 


3,809 


12,863 


1.12 


95,173 


6,453,005 


253 


2,125 


1.47 


177,409 


18,758,600 


90 


5,430 


17,369 


0.95 


40,987 


2.695.860 


117 


1,920 


1.52 


41,719 


2.972.767 


37 


1,325 


6,695 


1.40 


1,477,347 


112.551,013 


2,531 


3,706 


1.31 


2,016,601 


225.200.587 


522 


58,879 


35,952 


0.90 


65,318 


4.604,136 


171 


2,244 


1.42 


94,157 


7,728,114 


24 


2,943 


26,834 


1.22 


6,056 


393,445 


18 


1,822 


1.54 


1,133 


33,947 


3 


57 


943 


3.34 


5,834 


336,744 


18 


1.559 


1.73 


3,200 


154,300 


5 


113 


2,572 


2.07 


10,682 


643,637 


93 


577 


1.66 


11,892 


611,235 


12 


318 


4,245 


1.95 


2,275 


131,560 


5 


2,193 


1.73 


2,188 


94,285 


3 


83 


2,619 


2.32 


14,504 


1.023,538 


60 


1,422 


1.42 


5,667 


298.080 


12 


233 


2,070 


1.90 


1,054 
14,503 


48,550 
922,734 


4 


1,011 
836 


2.17 














92 


1.57 


3,541 


239,270 


7 


116 


2.848 


1.48 


47.367 


2,992,353 


94 


2,653 


1.58 


20,331 


1,132,985 


20 


667 


4,721 


1.79 


14,394 


815,522 


32 


1,333 


1.76 


2,799 


204,760 


7 


75 


2,438 


1.37 


1,919 


112,507 


14 


670 


1.71 


747 


20,650 


2 


45 


860 


3.62 


11,810 
4.593 
12,617 


601,757 
274.400 
771,900 


41 


1,223 
532 


1.96 














43 
67 


1.67 














960 


1.63 


832 


43,500 


2 


25 


1.813 


1.91 


40,605 


1.681.000 


123 


1.139 


2.42 


22,594 


1,115,600 


3 


446 


30.989 


2.03 



268 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
customers 



Peak 
load 
Decern 
ber 
1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



•2 E 

c. o 



o c 

S 8 



•^Maxville 

McGarry 

Meaford 

Merlin 

^■Merrickville 

#Midland 

Mildmay 

#Millbrook 

#>Milton 

#Milverton 

<#Mimico 

<i>Mitchell 

<#Moorefield 

<f>Morrisburij 

<#>Mount Brydges . . 

#Mount Forest 

#>Napanee 

#Neustadt 

<^Newboro 

Newburgh 

^Newbury 

#>Newcastle 

#>New Hamburg. . . . 

#tNew Liskeard 

Newmarket 

'^New Toronto 

Niagara 

<|>Niagara Falls 

#Nipigon Twp 

North Bay 

#North York Twp. 

Norwich 

^-Norwood 

<|>Oakville-Trafalgar 
<%>Oil Springs 

Omemee 

<^Orangeville 

Orillia 

^-Orono 

^Oshawa 



No. 

839 
2,904 
3,723 

607 



8,718 

869 

861 

5,488 

1,059 

17,566 
2,243 

313 
1,806 

993 

2,576 

4,507 

499 

284 

552 

334 
1,195 
2,129 
4,717 
8,087 

11,717 
2.620 

22,192 
2,687 

23.361 

257,209 

1,687 

1,077 

42,254 

481 

829 

4,693 

14,635 

845 
61,350 



No. 
317 
490 
1,527 
254 
358 

2,902 
317 
335 

1,784 
479 



917 
137 
743 
362 

1,025 

1,701 

208 

148 

193 

134 

481 

718 

1,627 

2,739 

3,960 
1,072 
7,435 
741 
7,685 

85,377 
691 
403 

11,988 
230 

312 

1,746 

5,490 

370 

19,850 



kw 

548 

1,136 

3,119 

372 

492 

9,064 
561 
529 

4,501 
886 

9,696 
2,123 

295 
1,540 

412 

2,166 

3,563 

319 

112 

278 

132 

926 

1,443 

3,603 

7,491 

28,406 
1,822 

17,283 
1,728 

17,390 

200,182 

1,029 

682 

38,780 

286 

455 
3,831 
5,625 

601 
69,959 



13,749 
37,869 
71,407 
7.805 
16,818 

137,945 
14,404 
19,225 

123,524 

27,147 

324,644 

54,345 

5,677 

38,347 

16,059 

56.442 

88,989 

7,099 

6,167 

10,862 

5,194 

22,904 

43,677 

119,833 

163,674 

221,869 
68,746 

379,080 
40,498 

469,729 

5,822,678 

37,689 

20,597 

960,103 

7,012 

14,696 
115,946 
263,381 

20,216 
1,039,077 



kwh 


No. 


1,181,464 


285 


3,102,787 


435 


6,496,609 


1,295 


583,982 


190 


1,365,275 


338 


16,561.845 


2,685 


1,352,302 


242 


1,579,256 


318 


10,203,639 


1,623 


1,835,557 


411 


32,075,290 


6,508 


4,152,996 


824 


487,797 


123 


3,950,495 


660 


954,074 


335 


5,103,940 


921 


8,590,519 


1,517 


737,240 


189 


328,941 


137 


719,769 


165 


385,708 


125 


2,023,435 


425 


3,773,038 


650 


7,713,100 


1,334 


15,388,654 


2,358 


20,511,517 


3,679 


5,800,677 


930 


30,271,299 


6,839 


4,531,421 


675 


40,730,856 


6,426 


526,711,019 


80,046 


2,913,690 


571 


1,868,666 


372 


76,723,188 


11,303 


496,183 


181 


1,196,114 


265 


9,612,710 


1,575 


27,081,500 


4,682 


1,629,410 


346 


124,813,072 


17,931 



kwh 
345 
594 
418 
256 
337 

514 
466 
414 
524 
372 

411 
420 
330 
499 
237 

462 
472 
325 
200 
364 

259 
^15 
484 
482 
544 

465 
520 
369 
559 
528 

555 
425 
419 
566 
228 

376 
509 
482 
392 

580 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



269 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












c fc 


Av- 








35 


^ 


Av- 








•2 6 


erage 








° 11 


.2 £ 


erage 






Cus- 


imp 
usto 


cost 






Cus- 


^'m S 


>. a 2 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mom 
consu 
perci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aven 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


i 


6,430 


376,870 


28 


1,122 


1.71 


3.225 


111,000 


4 


126 


2.313 


2.91 


15.019 


864,901 


52 


1,386 


1.7 A 


1.198 


71,230 


3 


26 


1,979 


1.68 


33,671 


2,297,391 


197 


972 


1.47 


43,888 


3,441,564 


35 


1,299 


8,194 


1.28 


8,746 


534,393 


60 


742 


1.64 


3,003 


117,394 


4 


90 


2.446 


2.56 


2,571 


163,170 


13 


1,046 


1.58 


3,845 


314,034 


7 


152 


3.739 


1.22 


52,836 


4,743,872 


149 


2,653 


1.11 


148,086 


18,329,259 


68 


6,830 


22.462 


0.81 


6,806 


393,047 


67 


489 


1.73 


4,172 


226,477 


8 


143 


2.359 


1.84 


4,220 


202,060 


15 


1,123 


2.09 


749 


45,400 


2 


18 


1.892 


1.65 


48,047 


3,146,671 


141 


1,860 


1.53 


65.962 


5,099.381 


20 


1,753 


21,247 


1.29 


12,518 


606,129 


52 


971 


2.07 


12,173 


612,496 


16 


407 


3,190 


1.99 


113,236 


8,578,218 


260 


2,749 


1.32 


58,460 


4,656.350 


40 


1,959 


9,701 


1.26 


18,409 


1,016,105 


68 


1,245 


1.81 


42,564 


3.139.095 


25 


1,178 


10,464 


1.36 


1,700 


92,690 


12 


644 


1.83 


4,616 


322,850 


2 


121 


13,452 


1.43 


20,108 


1,486,624 


74 


1,674 


1.35 


7.712 


623,897 


9 


262 


5,777 


1.24 


4,979 


223,053 


22 


845 


2.23 


5,992 


223,480 


5 


213 


3,725 


2.68 


27,273 


1,869,710 


80 


1,948 


1.46 


17,766 


1,211,780 


24 


591 


4,208 


1.47 


49,050 


3.635,360 


149 


2,033 


1.35 


34.665 


3,003,944 


35 


1.324 


7,152 


1.15 


1,474 


83,340 


17 


409 


1.77 


2.140 


155,430 


2 


89 


6,476 


1.38 


1,204 


56,668 


11 


429 


2.12 














3,919 


149,250 


24 


518 


2.63 




3.358 


153,250 


4 


105 


3,193 


2.19 


1,290 


76,060 


8 


70J^ 


1.70 


206 


4,560 


1 


12 


380 


4.53 


12,864 


805,891 


45 


1,0 U9 


1.60 


10,583 


856,188 


11 


294 


6,486 


1.24 


13.720 


777,881 


50 


1,296 


1.76 


21,807 


1,479,728 


18 


630 


6,851 


1.47 


82,111 


4,159,700 


275 


1.261 


1.97 


47,578 


3,333,400 


18 


1.139 


15,432 


1.43 


123,246 


8,141,902 


332 


2,043 


1.51 


87,016 


8,041,628 


49 


2.605 


13,676 


1.08 


143,111 


11,446,136 


245 


3,893 


1.25 


861,924 


113,407.782 


36 


24.640 


262,518 


0.76 


24,540 


1,376,411 


126 


910 


1.78 


6,783 


433.472 


16 


214 


2,258 


1.56 


361,010 


29,510,416 


546 


4,504 


1.22 


239,526 


24.707.878 


50 


7.338 


41.180 


0.97 


23,067 


2,086,391 


62 


2,804 


1.11 


12,740 


1.821.686 


4 


361 


37.952 


0.70 


315,484 


22,850,734 


1,129 


1,687 


1.38 


139,830 


12,314,229 


130 


4,177 


7,894 


1.14 


2,998.533 


202,834,976 


4,624 


3,000 


1.48 


1,776,769 


171,135,266 


707 


57,583 


1U,800 


1.04 


16,148 


781,545 


110 


592 


2.07 


3.767 


185,932 


10 


123 


1,549 


2.03 


6,346 


406,626 


26 


1,303 


1.56 


4,114 


193,510 


5 


175 


3,225 


2.13 


293,127 


20,853,486 


490 


3,547 


1.41 


767.925 


95,900,360 


195 


17.577 


40,983 


0.80 


1,573 


66,770 


16 


348 


2.36 


8,168 


878,216 


33 


175 


2,218 


0.93 


5,087 


220,258 


42 


437 


2.31 


3,834 


276,685 


5 


89 


4,611 


1.39 


37,676 


2,535,045 


123 


1,718 


1.49 


32,516 


2,671,621 


48 


1.343 


4,638 


1.22 


168,675 


12,980,088 


666 


1,624 


1.30 


301,006 


30,801,552 


142 


11.955 


18,076 


0.98 


5,303 


343,026 


21 


1,361 


1.55 


2,991 


229.652 


3 


96 


6,379 


1.30 


440,810 


37,384,655 


1,643 


1.896 


1.18 


1,417,008 


180.514,938 


276 


45.076 


54,503 


0.78 



270 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 





Peak 






load 




Decem- 


Total 


ber 


customers 


1961 


No. 


kw 


90.604 


194,655 


296 


432 


6,228 


12,505 


328 


568 


619 


1,287 


1,977 


3,614 


503 


943 


2,068 


2,529 


1,397 


2,956 


2,023 


4,447 


15,043 


38,332 


1,319 


1,900 


519 


1,054 


112 


145 


1,795 


3,992 


195 


677 


842 


4,366 


14,061 


45,389 


480 


266 


526 


408 


4,704 


7,357 


2,818 


13,262 


1,574 


2,464 


1,084 


1,186 


2,774 


8,047 


513 


1,588 


839 


1,566 


298 


317 


1,138 


1,019 


369 


690 


1,742 


3,688 


3,328 


9,027 


62 


59 


168 


287 


175 


409 


452 


586 


1,117 


1,820 


340 


982 


2,601 


4,816 


347 


724 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 





y 

ption 
Lomer 


Cus- 


2 S § 


tomers 


c S 3 




2 8 K 



^Ottawa (including Eastview 
and RockclififePark). . . 

Otterville 

<^Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

#Parkhill 

#Parry Sound 

<#>Penetanguishene 

#Perth 

Peterborough 

^Petrolia 

<^Pickering 

<|t'+Pickle Lake Landing 

Townsite 

^Picton 

#Plattsville 

#Point Edward 

Port Arthur 

^Port Burwell 

<§>tPort Carling 

Port Colborne 

#Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

#Port Hope 

<#Port McNicoU 

#Port Perry 

#Port Rowan 

#Port Stanley 

<t>tPowassan 

<f>Prescott 

'^Preston 

^Priceville 

Princeton 

#Queenston 

4-Rainy River 

#tRedLakeTwp 

#Red Rock 

-^Renfrew 

^Richmond 



No. 

289,236 

767 

17,732 

748 

1,518 

5,790 
1,135 
6,137 
4,664 
5,663 

46,803 
3,670 
1,752 

§250 
4.739 

484 

2,762 

43,384 

766 

♦492 

14.949 
6.736 
3,037 
1,733 
8,100 

1,056 

2,291 

789 

*1.457 

1,042 

5,255 

11,543 

150 

418 

506 

1,140 
2,568 
1,772 
8,461 
1,188 



4,569.588 

14.394 

353,553 

14,383 

31,565 

106,556 
28,785 

133,771 
64.458 
99,734 

920,886 
52,194 
42,379 

6,253 
101,858 

11,380 
30,441 
741,289 
19,437 
27,587 

194,190 

158,716 

49,060 

49,944 

182,408 

20,384 
46.988 
10,626 
52,488 
25,691 

88,094 

215,976 

2,745 

8,726 

12.180 

39.477 
70.996 
21,949 
148,045 
25,443 



kwh 


No. 


kwh 


604.238.556 


79,277 


635 


1.256.280 


239 


438 


34,071.452 


5,778 


491 


1,124.370 


255 


367 


2.940.385 


505 


485 


8,123,927 


1,734 


390 


2.193,775 


444 


412 


10,572,846 


1,880 


469 


6,924,111 


1,284 


449 


9,843,336 


1,839 


446 


87.629,081 


13,339 


547 


3,320.836 


1,105 


250 


2.912.733 


485 


500 


390,762 


82 


397 


9,497,585 


1.471 


538 


1,002,000 


181 


461 


2,578,875 


749 


287 


88.868.466 


12,347 


600 


734.206 


451 


136 


1,409,100 


459 


256 


14,513,338 


4,125 


293 


15,021,429 


2,650 


472 


3,522,865 


1,344 


218 


3,402,559 


891 


318 


15,989.174 


2,586 


515 


1,679,006 


503 


278 


4.563.485 


787 


483 


720,510 


266 


226 


3,426,980 


1,079 


265 


1,844,200 


293 


525 


9,587,970 


1,622 


493 


18,486,042 


3,061 


503 


130,730 


55 


198 


767,066 


129 


496 


1,234,565 


168 


612 


1,519,769 


419 


302 


4,157,000 


892 


388 


2,500,097 


315 


661 


14.415,187 


2,352 


511 


2,173,225 


336 


539 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



271 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


service 












c ^ 


Av- 








35 


C flj 


Av- 








•B E 


erage 








g-S 


.2 £ 


erage 






Cus- 


>? ^ 2. 
2 2^ 


cost 






Cus- 


^>2 


2 E <« 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aven 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


(i 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


^ 


5,433,430 


463,919,983 


11.142 


3,470 


1.17 


476,363 


44,520.891 


185 


15,781 


20,054 


1.07 


5,620 


310,940 


50 


518 


1.81 


2,189 


106.715 


7 


71 


1,270 


2.05 


131.163 


10,019,550 


308 


2,711 


1.31 


143,865 


12,749.616 


142 


5.696 


7,482 


1.13 


8,441 


434,230 


65 


557 


1.94 


3,239 


231.043 


8 


85 


2,407 


1.40 


16,097 


985,848 


95 


865 


1.63 


11,040 


856.510 


19 


466 


3,757 


1.29 


33,392 


2,296,112 


206 


929 


1.45 


50,567 


4,525.344 


37 


1,984 


10,192 


1.12 


13,820 


743.723 


45 


1,377 


1.86 


12,603 


711.680 


14 


372 


4.236 


1.77 


56.968 


3.552,057 


165 


1,794 


1.60 


26,525 


2,135.132 


23 


769 


7,736 


1.24 


22,397 


1.902,883 


90 


1,762 


1.18 


38.582 


4.429,789 


23 


1,420 


16,050 


0.87 


47,150 


3,971,045 


141 


2,347 


1.19 


44,932 


4.446.580 


43 


1,825 


8,617 


1.01 


460,283 


29,602,029 


1.445 


1,707 


1.55 


630,187 


78.558.923 


259 


21,287 


25,276 


0.80 


35,721 


1.745,336 


178 


817 


2.05 


42,990 


2,067.948 


36 


1,077 


4,787 


2.08 


9,455 


695.297 


30 


1.931 


1.36 


5.639 


456.050 


4 


187 


9,501 


1.24 


2.785 


162.099 


29 


466 


1.72 


660 


39.200 


1 


13 


3,267 


1.68 


65,974 


4,553,048 


288 


1.317 


1.45 


27.628 


1.943,809 


36 


908 


4.500 


1.42 


1.704 


77,400 


11 


586 


2.20 


15.315 


1.462,500 


3 


392 


40,625 


1.05 


17,057 


1,232,954 


63 


1,631 


1.38 


128,401 


12,727,544 


30 


4,219 


35,354 


1.01 


463,010 


43.529,828 


1,655 


2,192 


1.06 


560.050 


63,111,463 


59 


23,849 


89,140 


0.89 


4,891 


220.755 


25 


736 


2.22 


507 


3.750 


4 


39 


78 




15,430 


729.500 


61 


997 


2.12 


1,446 


121,500 


6 


53 


1,688 


1.19 


115.110 


6,404,806 


491 


1.087 


1.80 


87,128 


7,586,248 


88 


2,793 


7,184 


1.15 


74,846 


5,526,392 


157 


2.933 


1.35 


361,206 


54.474,245 


11 


8,204 


412,684 


0.66 


30,319 


1.869,979 


193 


807 


1.62 


48,145 


4.693.295 


37 


1,446 


10,570 


1.03 


27,227 


1.406.793 


179 


655 


1.94 


12,794 


725,308 


14 


327 


4,317 


1.76 


57,480 


4.056.427 


144 


2,347 


1.42 


155,955 


16,341.549 


44 


4.616 


30,950 


0.95 


3,063 


192,410 


8 


2,004 


1.59 


28,568 


1.426,320 


2 


909 


59.430 


2.00 


12.341 


889.783 


38 


1.951 


1.39 


5.414 


333,906 


14 


231 


1.988 


1.62 


5.937 


382.432 


29 


1,099 


1.55 


703 


28,010 


3 


26 


778 


2.51 


11.087 


623,890 


42 


1.238 


1.78 


7,391 


305,704 


17 


323 


1,499 


2.42 


12.653 


700,600 


72 


811 


1.81 


968 


34.700 


4 


34 


723 


2.79 


38,192 


2,695,157 


102 


2,202 


1.42 


35,176 


3.388.110 


18 


1,263 


15,686 


1.04 


51,409 


3.274.911 


153 


1,784 


1.57 


231,000 


19.482.072 


114 


7.804 


14,241 


1.19 


810 


46.500 
206.271 


7 
36 


554 

477 


1.74 
1.74 














3,582 


1.432 


62,165 


3 


55 


1,727 


2.30 


5,372 


399,909 
455.890 


<-7 


4,761 
1,310 


1.34 














12.740 


29 


2.79 


3,274 


166,873 


4 


57 


3,477 


1.96 


46.009 


2.862.103 


215 


1.109 


1.61 


10,612 


400,100 


10 


280 


3,334 


2.65 


13.208 


1.044.807 


24 


3.628 


1.26 


1,582 


181,000 


1 


56 


15,083 


0.87 


55,396 


4,166,268 


187 


1,857 


1.33 


81,822 


8,413,405 


62 


3,033 


11,308 


0.97 


8.161 


490,973 


11 


3,719 


1.66 






























272 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 





Peak 






load 




Decem- 


Total 


ber 


customers 


1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



o c 



Av- 
erage 
cost 



^Richmond Hill 

Ridgetown 

#Ripley 

^Riverside 

#>Rockland 

^Rockwood 

Rodney 

^Rosseau 

#>Russell 

St. Catharines 

<t>St. Clair Beach 

<#St. George 

St. Jacobs 

<#>St Mary's 

<$>St. Thomas 

#Sandwich East Twp 

<$>Sandwich West Twp 

#>Sarnia 

<$>Scarborough Twp 

<i>Schreiber Twp 

<^Seaforth 

<$>Shelburne 

<#>Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 

Smith's Falls 

Smithville 

Southampton 

^tSouth Porcupine Townsite 

^tSouth River 

^-Springfield 

Stamford Twp 

<t>Stayner 

<#>Stirling 

#>Stoney Creek 

#Stouffville 

Stratford 

<#>Strathroy 

Streetsville 

#Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 



No. 

17,242 

2,560 

443 

17,911 

2,980 

857 

1,105 

231 

556 

83,736 

1,446 

765 

686 

4,515 

22,191 

21,954 

28,436 

50,265 

208,864 

2,210 

2,192 
1,295 
8,625 
2,692 
9,209 

871 

1,769 

§5,700 

1,032 

517 

30,470 
1,658 
1,296 
6,387 
3,216 

20,536 
5,110 
5,180 
6,328 

79.281 



STo. 


kw 


4,845 


11.203 


1,056 


1,554 


218 


359 


5,442 


8,186 


728 


1,270 


290 


488 


452 


604 


129 


111 


206 


338 


26,140 


87,471 


430 


736 


287 


549 


245 


560 


1,675 


10,842 


7,936 


16,835 


6,247 


7,440 


7,871 


14,335 


15,669 


134,646 


64,904 


163,880 


675 


1,476 


891 


1,904 


585 


1,010 


3,207 


8,086 


949 


1,890 


3,382 


8,077 


374 


559 


1,199 


1,089 


1,940 


2,607 


330 


251 


182 


272 


9,141 


17,617 


676 


1,227 


546 


1,105 


2,006 


4,357 


1,096 


2,333 


6.967 


16.978 


1,822 


3,829 


1.504 


3.627 


1.650 


2.796 


23.290 


45.413 



368,387 
33,814 
10,750 

296,458 
40,652 

19,410 

13,936 

5.317 

9.749 

1.158.619 

32,041 

11,303 

13.265 

105.555 

485.922 

366.506 

570.063 

791,016 

4,407,534 

39.437 

46.503 
29.199 

121.168 
72.536 

177.455 

13.540 
42,558 
99.357 
14.841 
8,393 

589.814 
30.881 
30,231 

144,348 
84.095 

431.214 

96,995 

103,558 

101,138 

1,514,705 



kwh 


No. 


28,642,641 


4,585 


2.399,451 


859 


898,300 


199 


21,026,183 


5,295 


3,471,353 


687 


1,479,981 


270 


1.147.798 


359 


305.470 


121 


1.008,864 


190 


88.860.619 


23,462 


2,071,067 


413 


1,207,980 


254 


1,116,072 


195 


8,859,117 


1,537 


37,621,854 


7,417 


17,248,881 


5,954 


33,952.615 


7,474 


59,377,748 


14,657 


377,773,701 


61,744 


4,606,157 


634 


3,950,465 


782 


2,373.630 


528 


12,168,675 


2,868 


5,084.822 


805 


17,553,254 


2,902 


959,963 


275 


3.181.355 


1,058 


6.517,900 


1,656 


479,499 


303 


738,487 


172 


45,689,665 


8,423 


2,845,999 


606 


2,722,445 


485 


13,229,639 


1,898 


6,280,992 


1,015 


37,507,517 


6,132 


8,577,500 


1,623 


7,586,964 


1,319 


7,475,269 


1,547 


135,269,891 


20,940 



kwh 
521 
233 
376 
331 
421 

457 
266 
210 
442 

Jt20 

418 
396 
477 
480 
423 

241 
379 
338 
510 
605 

421 
375 
354 
526 
504 

291 
251 
328 
176 
358 

452 
397 
468 
581 
516 

510 
440 
479 
403 
538 



tNine months' operation. 

For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



273 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(;including flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












C OJ 


Av- 








3:S 


^ 


Av- 








■B s 


erage 








^ i-S 


•2 E 


erage 






Cus- 


>, a 2 
2 § ^ 


cost 






Cus- 


ige 

rs'm 
bill 


S E ^ 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per CI 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aven 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per c\ 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


^ 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


6 


123,714 


8,092,715 


205 


3.290 


1.53 


95,634 


7,247,386 


55 


2,655 


10,981 


1.32 


26,612 


1,512,300 


167 


755 


1.76 


30,262 


1,943,140 


30 


899 


5,398 


1.56 


3,091 


170.020 


16 


886 


1.82 


1,919 


98,200 


3 


67 


2,728 


1.95 


50,325 


3.443,039 


115 


2,495 


1.46 


44,688 


3,241,068 


32 


1,520 


8,440 


1.38 


10,657 


690,170 


37 


1,554 


1.54 


1,591 


155,968 


4 


72 


3,249 


1.02 


3,731 


223.190 


19 


979 


1.67 


1,321 


49,500 


1 


42 


4,125 


2.67 


8,269 


574,313 


82 


584 


1.44 


6,794 


306,270 


11 


247 


2,320 


2.22 


1,913 
2,207 


106,450 
160,931 


8 


1,109 


1.80 














13 


1,032 


1.37 


623 


36,200 


3 


37 


1,006 


1.72 


676,239 


40,267,388 


2,363 


1,700 


1.68 


2,058,230 


240,638,096 


315 


57,903 


70,000 


0.86 


3.766 


216.560 


11 


1,641 


1.74 


2,941 


109.450 


6 


115 


1,520 


2.69 


4,877 


397,611 


26 


1,274 


1.23 


6,143 


501,320 


7 


205 


5.968 


1.23 


8,394 


469,076 


41 


953 


1.79 


6,330 


234,612 


9 


254 


2,172 


2.70 


28,310 


1,854.847 


95 


1,627 


1.53 


351,226 


50,231,055 


43 


9,122 


97,347 


0.70 


177,055 


12,628.822 


403 


2,611 


1.40 


303,232 


29,787,217 


116 


8,869 


21,399 


1.02 


113,471 


5,880,510 


232 


2.112 


1.93 


121,608 


5,565,233 


61 


3,138 


7,603 


2.19 


191,807 


11,342,702 


327 


2,891 


1.69 


119,664 


7,987,753 


70 


2.799 


9,509 


1.50 


410,423 


27,998,628 


837 


2,788 


1.47 


5,459,092 


929,671,559 


175 


117.916 


442,701 


0.59 


1,724,846 


133,269,681 


2,827 


3,928 


1.29 


1,610,826 


161,766,366 


333 


46.597 


40,482 


1.00 


12,044 


1,028,095 


40 


2,142 


1.17 


3,236 


423,200 


1 


98 


35,267 


0.76 


24.135 


1.455.772 


86 


1.411 


1.66 


19,414 


1.367.423 


23 


683 


4,954 


1.42 


12,451 


802.470 


44 


1,520 


1.55 


6,037 


318,810 


13 


252 


2,044 


1.89 


100.788 


7,541.809 


257 


2,445 


1.34 


157,850 


16.211,918 


82 


5.207 


16,476 


0.97 


45.268 


1,858.997 


137 


1,131 


2.44 


11,540 


1,150.340 


7 


222 


13,695 


1.00 


112,684 


8.899.430 


448 


1,655 


1.27 


47,071 


5,033,039 


32 


1,691 


13,107 


0.94 


12.542 


605.782 


84 


601 


2.07 


13,465 


785,937 


15 


412 


4,366 


1.71 


18,986 


986.254 


127 


647 


1.93 


18,090 


1,095,480 


14 


513 


6,521 


1.65 


48,728 


2,612.356 


276 


789 


1.87 


3,832 


257,700 


8 


126 


2,634 


1.49 


6.444 


246,865 


23 


1,193 


2.61 


4,776 


246,238 


4 


93 


6.840 


1.94 


1,489 


115,560 


7 


1,376 


1.29 


1,604 


53,125 


3 


96 


1.476 


3.02 


224,677 


10,996.681 


612 


1,497 


2.04 


234,123 


21,581,619 


106 


7,432 


16,967 


1.03 


11,247 


738,158 


52 


1.008 


1.52 


9,435 


823,082 


18 


363 


3,811 


1.15 


9,357 


556,217 


43 


1,078 


1.68 


7,272 


491,212 


18 


301 


2,274 


1.48 


37,519 


2,787,941 


90 


2,581 


1.35 


8,819 


569,509 


18 


350 


2,637 


1.55 


30,925 


1.580.803 


67 


1,966 


1.96 


13,346 


595,503 


14 


402 


3,545 


2.24 


202,676 


13,839,028 


683 


1,689 


1.46 


265.573 


25,159,519 


152 


8,973 


13,794 


1.08 


45,125 


3.168.864 


145 


1,821 


1.42 


61,179 


4.610,304 


54 


2,194 


7,115 


1.33 


38,501 


2,172,343 


161 


1,124 


1.77 


42,994 


4,148.992 


24 


1,209 


14,406 


1.04 


41,564 


2,527,243 


87 


2,421 


1.64 


6,479 


529,046 


16 


183 


2.755 


1.22 


755,580 


45,156,193 


2,080 


1,809 


1.67 


225.448 


17,290,881 


270 


7,117 


5.337 


1.30 



274 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 



Peak 
load 
Decern 
Total ber 

customers 1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



>. a 2 



^Sunderland 

#Sundridge 

Sutton 

<^Swansea 

<i>Tara 

Tavistock 

■^Tecumseh 

#Teeswater 

<#>Terrace Bay Twp 

<^Thamesford 

^-Thamesville 

#Thedford 

^Thessalon 

Thornbury 

#>Thorndale 

^tThornloe 

Thornton 

<^Thorold 

<#Tilbury 

<$>Tillsonburg 

<t>tTimmins (including 

Schumacher) 

Toronto (including Leaside) 

^Toronto Twp 

#>Tottenham 

^Trenton 

<$>Tweed 

#Uxbridge 

#.Vankleek Hill 

Victoria Harbour 

#>Walkerton 

<^Wanaceburg 

VVardsville 

<t>Warkworth 

#>Wasaga Beach 

Waterdown 

#>Waterford 

Waterloo 

#Watford 

Waubaushene. 

Webbwood 



No. 

593 

796 

1.301 

9,512 

491 

1.220 
4,462 
884 
1.922 
1,074 

1.041 

749 

1,788 

1,141 

417 

193 

323 

8,602 

3,086 

6,605 



§32,000 
661,785 

63,175 
752 

12,945 

1,818 
2,374 
1,723 
1.036 
3.933 

7,957 
331 
537 
*506 

1,858 

2,234 
21,665 

1,234 

§1.400 

560 



No. 
262 
298 
894 
3,528 
233 

513 
1,341 
360 
438 
387 

441 
329 
519 
539 
136 

40 

104 

2,674 

1,042 

2,519 



9,760 

210.321 

16,491 

273 

4,249 

641 
912 
556 
503 
1,350 

2,748 
151 
238 

1,034 
593 

812 
6,640 
529 
447 
149 



kw 

458 

392 

1,072 

6,606 

489 

900 
1,559 

770 

1,532 

888 

823 
540 
790 
1,062 
266 

45 

153 

14,379 

1,489 

5,932 



16,162 

613,270 

57,711 

468 

15.954 

1.274 

1,815 

782 

396 

3,389 

8,099 
216 
338 
307 

1.180 

1.171 

19.096 

1,402 

328 

176 



12.546 
16.165 
34.624 
187,025 
10,742 

28,749 
69,670 
17,333 
33,550 
29,107 

15,306 
14,208 
32,638 
26,571 
9,830 

2,470 
5.665 

143.840 
38,249 

116.477 



606.369 

11.830.658 

1,302,395 

15,616 

230,906 

26,447 
46.944 
26.864 
20.237 
69.123 

84,507 
5.280 
10,704 
29,875 
41,866 

42,870 
422,876 
26.815 
15,236 
11.313 



kwh 

1,158.462 

1.105.250 

2,856.000 

19,415,142 

945,090 

2.393.974 
4,019,781 
1,522,915 
4,943.025 
2,170,237 

1,097,619 
1.289,382 
1,886,943 
1.743.280 
731.543 

158,040 

439,430 

10,924,623 

2.458,830 

9,032,442 



42.890.300 

940,379,960 

112,783,690 

1,420.445 

24,179,338 

3.183.414 
4.538.879 
1.822.893 
1.187,788 
6.233,535 

6.801.405 

400,987 

923.583 

1.237,370 

3.480,944 

2,933,448 
41,623,351 

2.268.501 
899,006 
418.741 



No. 
239 
269 
731 
3.371 
210 

403 
1.278 
325 
407 
365 

387 
297 
434 
436 
128 

29 
91 

2.396 
928 

2,198 



8,431 

176,770 

15,711 

247 

3.929 

570 
823 
506 
466 
1.232 

2.425 
117 
223 
829 
501 

770 
6.030 
471 
419 
121 



kwh 
404 
342 
326 
480 
375 

495 
262 
390 
1.012 
495 

236 
362 
362 
333 
476 

454 
402 
380 
221 
342 



424 
443 
598 
479 
513 

465 

460 
300 
212 
422 

234 
286 
345 
124 
579 

317 
575 
401 
179 
288 



For explanation of symbols see page 276. 



Statement D 



275 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 


















(including flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power 


SERVICE 












c fc 


Av- 








35 


c fc 


Av- 








"B s 


erage 








° i"^ 


■2 H 


erage 






Cus- 


1" ll 


cost 






Cus- 


§il5 


hly 
impi 
jsto 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 

kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Aven 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


^ 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


i 


3,687 


196,725 


19 


863 


1.87 


3,428 


211,446 


4 


111 


4.405 


1.62 


8,077 


436,270 


26 


1,398 


1.85 


1,287 


58,300 


3 


42 


1,619 


2.21 


23,167 


1,378,195 


152 


756 


1.68 


5.463 


277,290 


11 


173 


2,101 


1.97 


67,552 


4,996,064 


137 


3,039 


1.35 


66.293 


7,604,209 


20 


2,017 


31,684 


0.87 


3,317 


211,710 


17 


1,038 


1.57 


7.588 


816,530 


6 


183 


11,341 


0.93 


11,875 


604,414 


101 


499 


1.96 


9.444 


598,170 


9 


279 


5,539 


1.58 


15,755 


896,661 


52 


1,437 


1.76 


10.859 


871,512 


11 


303 


6,602 


1.25 


5,421 


313,585 


27 


968 


1.73 


11.646 


994,310 


8 


352 


10,357 


1.17 


15,757 


1,616,520 


29 


4,645 


0.97 


4,065 


636,000 


2 


116 


26.500 


0.64 


3,446 


171,030 


17 


838 


2.01 


11,103 


994,986 


5 


238 


16,583 


1.12 


9,217 


623,696 


37 


1,405 


1.48 


18,159 


873,150 


17 


691 


4,280 


2.08 


4,296 


286,460 


25 


955 


1.50 


3,432 


333,700 


7 


102 


3,973 


1.03 


20,353 


995,401 


79 


1.050 


2.04 


4,462 


295,936 


6 


99 


4,110 


1.51 


13,603 


618.215 


84 


613 


2.20 


17,388 


1,132,995 


19 


570 


4.969 


1.53 


1,063 


50,104 


6 


696 


2.12 


2,180 


80,206 


2 


86 


3,342 


2.72 


1,418 


49,300 

43,230 

3,089,172 


11 


373 


2.88 














1,245 


13 


277 


2.88 














47,824 


232 


1,110 


1.55 


380,502 


53,188,219 


46 


10,076 


96,355 


0.72 


25,492 


1,528,654 


87 


1,464 


1.67 


29,287 


1.371.010 


27 


1,135 


4,232 


2.14 


102,367 


6,950,600 


268 


2,161 


1.47 


74,244 


6,043,807 


53 


2.315 


9,503 


1.23 


318,359 


18,813,400 


1,295 


1,211 


1.69 


29,384 


1,842,400 


34 


832 


4,516 


1.59 


9.354.387 


639,703,200 


26,472 


2,014 


1.46 


16,221,634 


1,620,656,199 


7,079 


429,811 


19,078 


1.00 


419.444 


29,209,982 


585 


4,161 


1.44 


1,529,753 


181,301,843 


195 


35,972 


77,479 


0.84 


3.797 


203,845 


21 


809 


1.86 


2,009 


173,281 


5 


55 


2,888 


1.16 


90,773 


7,188,497 


242 


2.475 


1.26 


388,585 


55,070,311 


78 


10,993 


58,836 


0.71 


12,398 


1,072,519 


57 


1,568 


1.16 


7,770 


677,361 


14 


369 


4,032 


1.15 


16,844 


1,061,994 


65 


1,362 


1.59 


24,738 


1,362,011 


24 


865 


4,729 


1.82 


10,439 


605,542 


39 


1,294 


1.72 


4,849 


156,537 


11 


219 


1,186 


3.10 


4,776 


215,992 


35 


514 


2.21 


718 


39,640 


2 


19 


1,652 


1.81 


34,673 


2,291,382 


98 


1,948 


1.51 


33,887 


2,831,500 


20 


1.099 


11,793 


1.20 


62,334 


4,761,220 


232 


1,710 


1.31 


235.587 


28,861,277 


91 


7,282 


26,430 


0.82 


5,937 

2,385 

26,483 


314,082 

148,226 

1,175,330 


34 


770 


1.89 














15 


823 


1.61 














204 


480 


2.25 


372 


12,000 


1 


13 


1,000 


3.10 


13,655 


737.570 


75 


820 


1.85 


4.517 


264,090 


17 


166 


1.295 


1.71 


11,343 


652,720 


30 


1,813 


1.74 


11,813 


588,8:^0 


12 


394 


4,089 


2.01 


214,943 


13,870,167 


531 


2.177 


1.55 


282,114 


28.145,662 


79 


7.882 


29,690 


1.00 


13,104 


736,208 


45 


1,363 


1.78 


29.950 


2,318,738 


13 


912 


14,864 


1.29 


5,200 


281,930 


25 


940 


1.84 


2,662 


93,350 


3 


65 


2,593 


2.85 


5,501 


159,314 


27 


492 


3.45 


586 


52,700 


1 


10 


4,392 


1.11 



276 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Municipality 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
customers 



Peak 
load 
Decern 
ber 
1961 



Residential service 
(including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 





li 

>. a o. 


Cus- 


onthl 
nsum 
r cusi 


tomers 




S 8 ^ 



Av- 
erage 
cost 
per 
kwh 



#WelIand 

Wellesley 

^Wellington 

<#West Ferris Twp 
#VVest Lome 

<t> Weston 

#Westport 

Wheatley 

#Whitby 

<t>tWhite River 

^Wiarton 

Williamsburg. . . 

<^ Winchester 

<^Windermere .... 
<t>Windsor 

^Wingham 

<^Woodbridge .... 

<t> Woodstock 

Woodville 

^Wyoming 

<$>York Twp 

Zurich 



No. 

35,963 

644 

1,007 

5,428 

1,150 

9,394 
713 

1.336 

12.895 

818 

2,039 

350 

1,381 

ni8 

114.970 

2,875 

2,325 

20,303 

394 

889 

124.429 
718 



No. 

10,635 

287 

508 

1,947 

439 

3,715 
301 
488 

3,846 
264 

793 
140 
574 
121 
37,305 

1,078 
780 

6,995 
200 
341 

41,066 
305 



kw 

25,691 

420 

603 

4,366 

1,087 

9.719 

422 

853 

12,468 

495 

1,384 
251 

1.211 

100 

80.547 

2.566 

2,227 

19,085 

266 

422 

68,917 
496 



307,154 
14,962 
19,853 

138.497 
18.811 

210,499 
12,104 
20,099 

238.660 
26.074 

45,810 

4,840 

29,546 

5,230 

1,452,654 

59.057 

52,778 

433.243 

9.372 

10,534 

2,132,314 
15,619 



kwh 
21.675,682 
1.090.820 
1,839,764 
9,876,382 
1.306,694 

19.234,817 
1.151.940 
1,336,142 

21.360.145 
1,013,739 

3,758,938 
552,470 

2,506.192 

318,430 

130,217,000 

6,072,407 

4,897,143 

38,984,284 

619,939 

804,577 

216,621,823 
1,085,280 



No. 


kwh 


9,969 


300 


227 


400 


475 


323 


1,814 


454 


392 


278 


3,319 


483 


275 


349 


397 


280 


3,491 


510 


208 


406 


711 


441 


104 


443 


519 


i26 


109 


243 


34.555 


314 


959 


528 


720 


567 


6,500 


500 


159 


325 


310 


216 


39,229 


460 


246 


368 



1.42 
1.37 
1.08 
1.40 
1.44 

1.09 
1.05 
1.50 
1.12 
2.57 

1.22 
0.88 
1.18 
1.64 
1.12 

0.97 
1.08 
1.11 
1.51 
1.31 

0.98 
1.44 



# New municipal retail rate structure 

■%> and with small commercial customers transferred to residential billing 

t Local system 

* E.xcluding summer population 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



277 



Utilities and Local Systems 
AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1961 





Commercial 


SERVICE 
















(including flat-rate water-heaters) 






Industrial power i 


SERVICE 










c fc 


Av- 








35 


c V; 


Av- 








"B 2 


erage 








o o-S 


o 1 


erage 






Cus- 


>, a 2 
S E § 


cost 






Cus- 


^ >' 2 


hly 
mpl 

iStO 


cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Mont 
const 
perc 


per 
kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


tomers 


Averc 
tomei 
loads 


Mont 
consu 
per ci 


per 
kwh 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kwh 


^ 


$ 


kwh 


No. 


kw 


kwh 


# 


198.360 


12,692,835 


481 


; , .900 


1.56 


583,223 


63,342,181 


185 


16,490 


30,000 


0.92 


6,161 


321,470 


53 


505 


1.92 


2,503 


114,590 


7 


81 


1,364 


2.18 


3.865 


213,014 


18 


986 


1.81 


4,502 


228,362 


15 


172 


1,269 


1.97 


51,045 


3,072,962 


118 


2,170 


1.66 


52,296 


5,226,030 


15 


1,352 


29,034 


1.00 


9.813 


505,987 


35 


1,205 


1.94 


29,094 


1,946,721 


12 


760 


13,519 


1.49 


136,384 


10,072,056 


358 


2,345 


1.35 


155,313 


14,012,290 


38 


4,257 


30,729 


1.11 


6,479 


445,950 


24 


1,548 


1.45 


358 


5,476 


2 


29 


228 


6.54 


18.875 


924,420 


76 


1,014 


2.04 


17,120 


809,627 


15 


479 


4,498 


2.11 


92,225 


6,444,212 


310 


1,732 


1.43 


233,761 


27,466.472 


45 


7,003 


50,864 


0.85 


16,319 


688,100 


55 


1,043 


2.37 


6,121 


435,400 


1 


75 


36,283 


1.41 


19,531 


1.248,722 


66 


1,577 


1.56 


11,082 


761,056 


16 


357 


3,964 


1.46 


4,363 


303,848 


35 


723 


1.44 


261 


16,690 


1 


6 


1,391 


1.57 


11.449 


762,491 


44 


876 


1.50 


22,901 


2,461,235 


11 


593 


18,646 


0.93 


2.740 


148,760 


12 


1,033 


1.84 















877.032 


67.298,057 


1.979 


2,834 


1.30 


1,860,293 


171,565,072 


771 


61,732 


18,544 


1.08 


24,818 


1,717,683 


83 


1,725 


1.44 


36,553 


2,876,313 


36 


1,270 


6,658 


1.27 


17,426 


1,193,105 


48 


2,071 


1.46 


37,660 


3,463.639 


12 


1,106 


24,053 


1.09 


143.745 


10,495,487 


356 


2,457 


1.37 


377,285 


40,589.850 


139 


11,635 


24,334 


0.93 


3,860 


154,559 


38 


339 


2.50 


1,279 


42.830 


3 


39 


1,190 


2.99 


4,597 


310,105 


24 


1,077 


1.48 


8,748 


442,975 


7 


307 


5,274 


1.97 


564,404 


44,359,107 


1,294 


2,857 


1.27 


703,866 


70,818,409 


543 


23,576 


10,868 


0.99 


9,836 


412,566 


54 


637 


2.38 


2,062 


133,450 


5 


4S 


2.224 


1.55 



NOTE 

The figures shown in italics under the heading "Monthly consumption per customer" have 
been estimated to allow for the transfer of small commercial customers to residential service 
and/or certain power service customers to commercial service. 



278 



Index 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



A.M.K. 


1. — Association of Municipal 


M.E.U 




Electrical Utilities 


mni 


bhp 


— brake horsepower 




cfs 


— cubic feet per second 


X.O.P. 


C.L.C. 


— Canadian Labour Congress 


O.M.E 


ehv 


— extra-high voltage 




G.S. 


— Generating Station 


R.O.A. 


hp 


— horsepower 


R.P.D. 


Jet. 


—Junction 


rpm 


kv 


— kilovolt(s) 


s.o.s. 


leva 


— kilovolt-anipere(s) 


s.s. 


kvar 


— kilovar(s) 


T.S. 


kw 


— kilowatt(s) 


Twp. 


kwh 


— kilowatt-hour(s) 





. — Municipal Electrical Utilities 

— minimum 

— minute (20-min) 

— Northern Ontario Properties 
A. — Ontario Municipal Electric 
Association 

— Rural Operating Area 

— Rural Power District 

— revolutions per minute 

— Southern Ontario System 

— Switching Station 

— Transformer Station 

— Township 



Ajax. 



52, A 



INDEX 

In the index all page references to tables or graphs are in italic type figures. The code letters 
refer to statements in the text as follows: 

A = Statements "A" and "B" — Financial Statements of the Municipal Electrical Utilities 

C = Statement "C" — Rates and Typical Bills for Electrical Service in Municipal Electrical 
Utilities and Local Systems 

D = Statement "D" — Customers, Revenue, and Consumption in Municipal Electrical Utilities 
and Local Systems 

P = Statement of the Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 

5 = Statement of Sinking Fund Equity 

A 

A. W. Manby T.S. and Service Centre, 

see Manby, A. W., T.S. 

Abitibi Canvon G.S 9, 61, 63, 73, 75, 81 

82, 85, 91, 103, 144 

Abitibi Jet 82 

Abitibi Power & Paper Company, 

Limited IS, 103 

Abitibi River iv, 9, 11, 5<?, 60, 61 

75, 76, 103, 144 
Abrasives industry, power and energy 

supplied ....'. '. A3, 44 

Academy of Lighting Arts 38 

Accident prevention 97 

Accidents, electrical 56 

Accounting system of municipal 

electrical utilities 42 

Act, Provincial, to provide for the 

transmission of power 1 

Acton A 184 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Adam Creek 74 

Adam Creek Control Dam 73 

Adjustments, annual, to cost of power 

see Cost of power 
Administrative buildings, 

expenditures on 22 

see also X.O.P., S.O.S. , and 
Amalgamated Sx'stems 
Advances from Province of Ontario. 27, 29, 34 

Aeolian vibration 85 

Agnico Mines Limited 173 

Agriculture 5 

Aguasabon G.S 16, 103, 144 

Ailsa Craig A 184 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Air conditioning 62 



184 C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 

Alexander G.S 103, 144 

Alexandria A 184 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Alfred S^, A 184 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Allied Construction Council 96 

Alliston 52, A 184 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Allowance for providing step-down 

transformation 233 

Almonte 54, yl 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Aluminum Company of Canada, 

Limited 173 

Alvinston A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Amalgamated Systems 6 

Financial statements 156-161 

Amalgamation of Niagara and 

West Central Regions 2 

Amalgamation of the Southern Ontario 
System & Northern Ontario 

Properties iii, iv, 6, 19 

American Standards Association 97 

Arnherstburg A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Amortisseur winding failure 16 

Analysis of primary loads by types 

of industry 43 

Ancaster Twp A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Anchors for ehv transmission towers 91 

Anechoic test room 85 

Annexation of rural areas by 

municipalities 48 

Annual sunniiary 6 



Index 



279 



Apple Hill A 185 C 234 D 25^ 

P 118 S 136 

Appliance dealers 36 

Appliance servicing 36 

Application of funds 23 

Approvals Council of C.S.A 56 

Architects, Ontario Association of 39 

Arkona A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Arnprior A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Arthur A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Assets of the Commission 6, 21 

see also N.O.P., S.O.S., and 
Amalgamated Systems 
Assets, fixed, of the Commission. . .6, 22, 23 
see also N.O.P., S.O.S., Amalgamated 
Systems and Rural electrical ser\Mce 
Assets of the municipal electrical 

utilities 182-231 

Assistance, Provincial, for rural 

construction 27, 29, 45, 46 

Association of Municipal Electrical 

Utilities of Ontario 55, 57 

Athens A 185 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Atikokan Iwp A 228 C 234 D 258 

P 150 S 154 
Atomic Energy of Canada 

Limited 55, 61, 64, 65, 68 

Auburn G.S 102 

Aurora A 186 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Automatic equipment 96 

186 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

A 186 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

186 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 



Beardmore 
Beaverton . 



Avonmore A 

Aylmer 

Ayr 51, /I 



B 



Baden A 186 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Bala C234 D 258 

Balance sheets — Commission 26, 28, 156 

municipal 182-231 

Bancroft A 186 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Bargaining 96 

Barrett Chute G.S 102, 110 

Barrie 62, A 187 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 

Barrie T.S 68, 69 

Barry's Bay A 187 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Base-metals mining industry, power 

and encrg\- supplied 44 

Bath ' A 187 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Beachburg 41, .1 187 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Beachville A 187 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 
Beamsville A 187 C 234 D 258 

P 118 S 136 



Beck, Sir Adam, -Niagara 

Generating Stations 

Beck, Sir Adam, -Niagara 

G.S. No. 1 

Beck, Sir Adam, -Niagara 

G.S. No. 2 

Pumping-Generating Station . 

Beeton A 187 

Belle River 4 187 

Belleville 53, 54, A 188 

Belts, motor \ ehiclc safety 

Big Chute G.S ' 

Big Eddy G.S 

Bingham Chute G.S 

Blading strain 

Blasting control 

Blenheim A 188 



Blind River 
Bloom field . 



C 2.U n 25S 

A 187 C 231 I) 2 58 
P IIS S 136 



60 



102, 110 



A 188 

Blyth S\, A 188 

Bobcaygeon A 188 

Bolton A 188 

Bonds issued by the 

Commission 

Bonus rate for water-heating . . . 

Borrowing 

Bothwell A 189 



Bowmanville 
Bracebridge . 
Bradford .... 
Braeside .... 



A 189 

A 189 

A 189 

A 189 



Brampton 52, .4 189 

Brampton R.O.A 

Brant T.S 

Brantford 51, 66, .4 189 

Brantford Twp 4 189 



Brantford T.S 

Brechin A 189 



Bridgeport 4 190 

Bridgc-t\pe transmission towers 
Brigden.' A 190 

Brighton A 190 

Brockville 54, .4 190 

Bronte 

Bronte T.S 



. . . .102, 110 

16, 102 

C 234 D 2SH 
P 118 S 136 
C 231 D 258 
P 118 S 136 
C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 

93 

102 

102 

103 

91 

89 

C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 
C 234 D 258 
C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 
C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 
C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 
C 234 D 258 
P 118 S 136 

.27, 29, 32-5 

37 

V, 23 

C 236 D 260 
P 118 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 118 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 118 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 118 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 136 

98 

66 

C 236 I) 260 
P 120 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 136 

66 

C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 136 
C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 137 

70 

C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 137 
C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 137 
C 236 D 260 
P 120 S 137 

68 

68 



Code letters A, C, D, with page references, represent each of the statements so designated. 
ot Primary Power, and S Sinking Fund Equity. 



P repre.sents Cost 



280 



Index 



Bronze Medallion standard ^6 

Brussels 5\, A 100 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Buchanan, E. V., T.S 66 

Building materials industry, power 

and energy supplied 44 

Bundle conductors 83, 85, 86 

Burford S\, A WO C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Burgessville \ P>1 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Burk's F'alls \ P) I C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Burlington A P)l C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Buttonville T.S 67 



CAN DU, see Douglas Point Nuclear 
Power Station 

Cable, underground 17, 69, 70 

Cache Bay \ 228 C 236 D 260 

P 150 S 154 

Calabogie 102 

Caledonia S\, A 191 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Cameron Falls G.S 63, 103, 144 

Campbellford 4 IV 1 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Campbellville 4 PJl C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Canada Cement Company, Limited 173 

Canada Crushed & Cut Stone Limited. .173 

Canadian Allis-Chalmers Limited 79 

Canadian Electrical Codes 56 

Canadian General F21ectric Company 

Limited. '. .64, 80 

Canadian Industries, Limited 173 

Canadian Niagara Power Company, 

Limited 102 

Canadian Rock Salt Company Limited. . 173 

Canadian Standards Association 56 

Canadian Union of Operating Engineers . .96 
Canadian W'estinghouse Company Limited .80 

Cannington A 191 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Capacity, dependable peak i\', 9 

all systems 3, 6, 103, 104 

defined 101 

increase 9, 10 

sources of purchased power 102, 103 

see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 
Capacity of generating resources. . . . 102, 103 

Capital, net — of the Commission 2\, 22 

see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 

of municipal electrical utilities 182-231 

Capital construction program 22 

Capital expenditure, see Expenditure 
Capital investment, see Assets, fixed, of 
the Commission, M.E.U., and Rural 
electrical service 

Capreol i 228 C 236 D 260 

P 150 S 154 

Cardinal 4 191 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Caribou Falls G.S 103, 144 

Carillon Development 54, 89 

Carleton Place A 191 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 



Casselman A 192 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Cayuga 4 192 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Cement industry, power and 

energy supplied 44 

Central Region. . . 18, 46, 52, 62, 67, 167, 169 
Chalk Riyer A 192 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Chalk River T.S 68 

Chapleau G.S 103 

Chapleau Twp A 228 C 236 D 260 

Chatham A 192 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Chats Falls G.S 102, 110 

Chatsworth A 192 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Chemical industry, power and 

energy supplied 43, -^-Z 

Chenaux G.S 102, 110 

Cherry wood S.S 13, 68 

Chesley A 192 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Chesterville 4 193 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Chippawa 4 193 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Chippawa-Grass Island Pool 63 

Clark, H. R 98 

Clifford A 193 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Clinton 51, .4 193 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 

Clinton R.O.A 51 

Cobalt C 236 D 260 

Cobalt mining, power and 

energy supplied 44 

Cobden A 193 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Cobourg 54, A 193 C 236 D 260 

P 120 S 137 
Cochrane 55, 90, A 228 C 238 D 262 

P 150 S 154 

Cochrane District 75 

Colborne A 193 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 
Coldwater 4 193 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Coldwater project 87 

Collingwood A 193 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Colombo Plan 56 

Comber 4 194 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Commercial service 106 

defined 162, 232 

municipal systems 177 , 235-277 

rural. .....' ... . .46, 164, 166-70 

Commission-owned facilities, see Local 
systems, and Rural electrical 
service 

Commissions, advisorx- 1 

Communications — power and 

energy supplied 44 

.see also N.O.P., S.O.S., and 
Amalgamated Systems 

Computer, electronic 20 

Conciliation Board 97 

Concrete 88 

Conductor stringing 86, 87 

Conductor suspension assembly 86 



Index 



281 



Coniston i 22<S' C 23^ D 262 

P ISO S 154 

Coniston G.S 103 

Consumption, enerj^y — a\erage per 

customer 170, 176 

direct industrial customers 42 

municipal s\stems 176, 177, 256-77 

rural ser\ice 170 

Contractors 39 

Cookstown A 104 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Cooksville T.S 67 

Coral Rapids 75, 76 

Cornwall 69 

Corona 86, 87 

Coronaphone 94 

Cost, average, per kw 21 

municipal systems 176, 177 , 256-77 

rural ser\'ice 170 

Cost-contract utilities 30, 31, 41, 42 

Cost of power X"^, 30,31 

adjustments, annual 30, 31 

statements of, N.O.P 150-3 

S.O.S llQ-35 

Cost of pro\iding service 21 

N.O.P 31 

R.P.D 30, 31 

S.O.S 30 

Cost of service defined 4 

Cottam A 104 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Courtright A 104 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Creemore A 104 C 238 D 262 

P 120 S 137 

Crowland Twp 51 

Crystal Falls G.S. 103 

Customers, direct industrial 30, 31, 44 

power and energ\- supplie \. ... .44, 105, 107 

134, 152 
Customers, number of — 

direct industrial .2,20, 21, 23,25,40,42,45 

municipal 182 

rural 46, 47, 166-70 

ser\ed by municipal s\stems. .176, 256-77 

ultimate 6 

C>anamid, power and energy supplied . . . .44 



D 



Dashwood A 104 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 

Data processing, electronic 20 

Davis, William Grenville, M.L.A \- 

Deaths attributable to electrical causes. . . . 56 

Debt, long-term of the Commission 21 

see also N.O.P. & S.O.S.— liabilities 
of the municipal electrical 

utilities 182-231 

DeCew Falls G.S 102, 110 

Deep River A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 

Delauare 4 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 

Delhi i 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 
Deli\eries of power and energy in 

wholesale quantities 39, 40, 105 



Demand, see Requirements 
Dependable peak capacity, see Capacit\- 

dependable peak 
Depreciation, accumulated — Commission. .22 
see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 

municipal 182-231 

Deseronto A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 

Des Joachims G.S 64, 102, 110 

Detroit Edison Companv 13, 60, 102 

Detweiler T.S ' 66, 68 

Development program 58. 50 

Diesel-electric generating facilities 103 

Direct industrial customers, see 
Customers, direct industrial 
Distribution line, see Line 

Distributors of electrical equipment 36 

Dobson, Dr. W. P v, 62 

Domestic service, see Residential service 
Dorchester A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 

Dorchester R.O. A 48 

Douglas Point Nuclear Power 

Station. . . .v, 6, 55, 58, 61, 65, 68, 70, 88 

89, 91, 110 
Dravton A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 
Dresden A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 
Drumbo A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 
Drvden A 220 C 238 D 262 

P 150 S 154 

Dryden Chemicals Limited 173 

Dryden T.S. . 82 

Dryers, electric clothes 36 

Dual-element water-heaters 37 

Dublin S\, A 105 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 137 

Duncan, James S v 

Dundalk A 106 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 
Dundas 51, 66, A 106 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Dundas T.S 66 

Dunnville A 106 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 
Durham Si, A 106 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Dutch elm disease 18 

Dutton A 106 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 



E. V. Buchanan T.S., see Buchanan, 
E. v., T.S. 

Ear Falls G.S 103 

East Central Region. . . . .46, 53, 68. /^V, 160 

Eastern Ontario Division iii, 1, 110 

Eastern Ontario System 6 

Eastern Region. . 18, 46, 49, 54. 68, 97, 168 160 

East\iew, see Ottawa 

East York Twp 4 106 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Economic power despatch 93 

Economic trend in Canada i\', 9 

E:ganville 1 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 



Code letters A, C, D, with page references, represent each of the statements so designated, 
of Primary Power, and S Sinking Fund Equity. 



P represents Cost 



282 



Index 



Ehv studies 85-87 

Khv transmission \, 63, 71. 82, 83, 91 

Electric heating. .37, 38, 51, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62 
Electric Heatintj Association of Ontario . . .37 

Electrical maintenance 16 

Electrochemical industr>-, power 

and energy supplied 44 

Electrometallurgical industr\-, power 

and energ\- supplied 43, 44 

Electronic data processing 20 

Elk Lake Townsite C 238 D 262 

Elliott Chute G.S 103 

Elmira 66, .1 1Q7 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Elmvale A 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Elmwood A 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Elora 51. 66, .1 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Embro A 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Employee training 95, 96 

Employees, number of 96 

Employment statistics 6, 95, 96 

Energy — 

consumption, see Consumption 

produced for commercial load 3,6, 10, 

103 104 
see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 

purchased 6, 10, 102-4 

requirements, see Requirements 
supplied — to Commission 

customers 2, 4, (5, 106 

primary, in wholesale quantities. . . .105 

to direct industrial customers. .43, 44, 

105, 107, 134, 152 

to interconnected systems. '^-^, 105, 107 

to municipal systems. 105, 106, 118-35, 

150-3 

to R.P.D 105, 107, 134, 152 

for use in Ontario 10 

secondary — for export. ... 13, 30, 31, 134 

in wholesale quantities 44, 105, 

134, 152 

Engineering graduates appointed 95 

Englehart C 238 D 262 

English Rixer 60 

Epoxy resin 92 

Epoxy systems 93 

Equity in Ontario Hydro systems, 
see M.E.U. — equit>' 

Erieau . .A 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Erie Beach 1 197 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Hriii A 107 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 

Espanola A 220 C 238 D 262 

P 150 S 154 

Essa T.S 68, 70, 71 

Essex A 108 C 238 D 262 

P 122 S 138 
Ethyl Corporation of Canada Limited. . . 173 

Etobicoke Twp A 108 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Eugenia G.S 63, 9H, 102 

Europe 83 

Excise Tax Act 11 

Executive Council of th^ Province 

of Ontario 1 



Exeter A 108 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Expenditure — capital v, 22, 23, 50 

municipal 182-231 

nuclear research 23 

Export, 60-cycle secondary energy. J6>, 31, 134 

Export licences 11 

Extra-high-voltage studies 85-87 

Extra-high-voltage transmission. . .v, 63, 71, 

82, 83, 91 



Falconbridge Nickel Mines, Limited 173 

False set in cement 89 

Faradav Uranium Mines Limited 173 

Farm service 20, 50, 106, 164, 166-70 

Farm service rates 50, 57 

Fergus 66, .1 108 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

F^ilms of Commission activities 55 

Financial features of the Commission 4 

Financial operations — of the Commission . . 21 
of the municipal electrical utilities. ... 1 76 
F'inancial position, summary of — 

all systems 23 

municipal electrical utilities 179 

Finch A 108 C240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Fires due to electrical causes 56 

Fixed-rate utilities 41 , 42 

Fixture distributors 39 

Fixture manufacturers 39 

Flat-rate water-heater ser\ice 234-277 

Flesherton A 108 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Fluorescent lighting 84 

Fluorochlorohydrocarbon 91 

Fly ash 88 

Fonthill A 109 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 
Forest A 100 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 
Forest Hill 52, A 190 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Forestry 18 

Fort Frances 60 

Fort William n,82, A 220 C 240 D 264 

P 150 S 154 

Fountain Falls G.S 103 

Frankford A 100 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Frankford G.S 102 

French River 2 

Frequency of accidents 97, 98 

Frequency standardization. .23, 24, 29, 30, 31 

Freshet 11 

Frontenac T.vS 68 

Fuel-electric generating facilities, see 

Thermal-electric generating facilities 

Funded debt .32-5 

exchange di.scount and premium. .115, 148 
see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 



Galetta G.S 102 

Gait 5\, A 100 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Gathercole, George Edward v 

Gatineau Power Company 102 



Index 



283 



Generating stations 50*, 102, 103 

see also individual listings 
" " N.O.P. & S.O.S.— assets 
George W. Rayner G.S., see Rayner, 

George W., G.S. 
Georgetown A 199 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Georgian Bay Division iii, 1, 110, 112 

Georgian Bay Region. . . .46, 52, 68, 167, 169 

Georgian Bav Svsteni 6 

Geraldton ..'...'. C 240 D 264 

Ghana 56 

Glencoe A 199 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 
Glen Williams, see Georgetown 
Goderich 5\, A 199 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 

Gogama C 240 D 264 

Gold Medallion standard 37 

Gold mining industry, power 

and energy supplied 44 

Government of Ontario, see Ontario, 

Province of 
Government services, power 

and energy supplied 44 

Governor General in Council 11 

Grain elevators, power and energy 

supplied 44 

Grand Bend A 199 C 240 D 264 

P 122 S 138 
Grand Valle\- A 200 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Grantham Twp 51 

Grant-in-aid, see Assistance, 

Provincial for rural facilities 
Granton A 200 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 
Gravenhurst A 200 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Gray, James Joseph 173 

Great Lakes 90 

Great Lakes Power Corporation, 

Limited 15, 103 

Grimsbv A 200 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 
Guelph 5\, A 200 C240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Guelph T.S 66 

Guide to the Report 7 



H 



Hagersville A 200 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Hagues Reach G.S 102 

Hailevbur\- C 240 D 264 

Hamilton 5\, 66, A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Hamilton — Gage T.S 66 

—Lake T.S 66 

—Mohawk T.S 66 

Hamlet service. .46, 49, 50, 106, 164, 166-70 

Hanmer, T.S 71, 82 

Hanna Chute G.S 102 

Hanover 6H, A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Hanover G.S 102 

Hanover T.S 68, 70 



Hardware corona 86 

Harmon G.S 6, 5^', 61, 71 , 74, 75 

Harriston A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Harrow I 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Hastings A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Havelock A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Hawkesbur\- 54, .4 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Health of emplovees 99 

Hearn, Richard L., G.S.. . . iv, 5, 9, 5<?, 61, 64, 
88, 91, 94, 96, 102, 110 

Hearst SS, A 229 C 240 D 264 

Heating, electric. . . .37, 38, 51, 52, 54, 57, 62 

Heely Falls G.S. 102 

Helicopter operations 18 

Hepatitis 100 

Her Majesty the Queen in right of 

the Province of Ontario 173 

Hensall A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

Hepworth C 240 D 264 

Hespeler A 201 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 138 

High P^allsG.S 102 

Highgate A 202 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 139 

High-lift concrete placement 89 

Highlights of 1961 film 55 

Hinchinbrooke S.S 93 

Holden Otto, G.S 102, 110 

Holstein A 202 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 139 

Hornepayne C 240 D 264 

Hornepa^•ne G.S 103 

Hound Chute G.S 103 

House-heating 38, 234-55 

Hudson Townsite C 240 D 264 

Humberstone Twp 51 

Huntsville 4 202 C 240 D 264 

P 124 S 139 
Huronian Compau)-, Limited and 

International Nickel Compan>- of 

Canada, Limited 173. 

Hydro-electric energy generated 10, 104 

Hvdro-electric generating 

facilities \..102, 103, 110, 144 

Hydro-electric resources 59. 104 

H\-dro-Electric Power Commission 
of Ontario, The — 

established 1 

financial features 4 

legislation 1.172 

membership 1 

power supph- 2,4 

svstems 2 



1 

Ice conditions, technicjue for meeting 70 

Ice used in concrete mi.\ 88 

Indian Chute G.S 103 

Industrial customers, see Customers, 
direct industrial 



Code letters A, C, D, with page references, represent each of the statements so designated. 
of Primary Power, and S Sinking Fund Equity. 



P rt>presents Cost 



284 



Index 



Industrial power service 39, 106 

defined 163, 232 

municipal s\stenis 177, 235-77 

rural 46, 164, 165, 166-70 

IngersoU i 202 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 139 

Inspection 56 

Insulation, thermal 91 

1 nsulators 86 

I nterchaneje — between operating 

systems. . . . 24, 25, 30, 31, 104, 134, 152 
Interconnected systems. 2, 4, 14, 21, 42, 44, 45 
Interconnections with neighbouring 

utilities 59, 69 

Interim rates 5, 19, 20, 110-35, 151 

International Nickel Company of 

Canada Limited 173 

International Falls, Minnesota 60 

International Joint Commission 13, 63 

Interruptible energ\^ 11 

Inter-system account 21 

Inventor\- management and control . . . .v, 93 

Iran 56 

Iroquois A 202 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 

Iroquois Falls 75 

Island Falls 75 



J 



f. Clark Keith G.S., see Keith, 

J. Clark, G.S. 

lames Bav watershed 71, 75, 82 

larick, R.' E 98 

larvis 4 202 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Jellicoe Townsite C 242 D 266 

Joint Works Committee — 

St. Lawrence Development 13 



K 



Kagawong G.S 15, 103 

Kakabeka Falls G.S 103 

Kapuskasing IS, A 229 C 242 D 266 

P 150 S 154 

Kapuskasing T.S 81 

Kearns Townsite C 242 D 266 

Keith, J. Clark, G.S 60, 96, 102, 110 

Kemptville A 203 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Kenora T.S 60 

Killaloe station A\, A 203 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 
Kincardine . . .6, 61, 65, 66, A 203 C242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 

King Kirkland Townsite C 242 D 266 

Kingston 53, 54, 69, A 203 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 
Kingsville ..A 203 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Kipling G.S 6, 5<?, 61, 71, 74, 75 

Kirkfield ...A 203 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Kirkland Lake C 242 D 266 

Kirkland Lake T.S 59 

Kitchener S\, A 203 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 



L 



Labour Relations 96 

Labour Relations Act 97 

Lac Seul 11 



Lake Abitibi 75 

Lakefield ... .4 203 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Lakefield G.S 102 

Lake Huron 8, 61, 65 

Lake Nipissing 2 

Lake Ontario 13, 64 

Lake St. Joseph 11,16 

Lakeview G.S iv, 5, 17, 55, 58, 61, 64, 67 

68, 69. 70, 110 
Lambeth . . .A 203 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Lanark 4 204 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Lancaster. . A 204 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 
Lands and Forests, Department of, 

Ontario 63 

Larder Lake Twp 1 220 C 242 D 266 

P 150 S 154 
Latchford . . A 220 C 242 D 266 P 150 S 154 
Leamington.. 4 204 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Lebanon 56 

Legislature of the Pro\ince of 

Ontario 1, 45, 171 

Liabilities, long-term, see Debt, 

long-term, and N.O.P. & S.O.S. 

Lieutenant-Governor in Council 1 

Lighting 39 

Lindsay 54, T 204 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 

Line maintenance 17 

Line — rural distribution A, 6, 47, 166-0 

transmission 50 

Line trucks, radial-arm IZ- 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian 

Corporation Limited 173 

Listowel 4 204 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Little Abitibi River 75, 76 

Little Long G.S 6, 5^. 61. 71, 73, 74 

75, 83, 91, 99, 100, 144 

Little Long Rapids 74 

Live-line tools 92 

Load iv, 6, 9, 10, 36, 104 

direct industrial customers 42, 43, 44 

interconnected systems 44 

municipal systems 25H-77 

peak-defined 41 

rural 49 

see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 
Local distribution svstems. . .4, 21,40,41. 105 
106, 176, 177, 234-55, 258-77 
see also N.O.P. & S.O.S.— assets 

London 41, 48, 51 , A 204 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 

London R.O.A 48 

London Twp. Hvdro SNstem 41 

Long Branch . . .' '. . .A 205 C 242 D 266 

P 124 S 130 
L'Orignal. . A 205 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Lower Nine Mile Rapids 75, 76 

Lower Sturgeon G.S 103 

Low-lift concrete placement 89 

Lucan 4 205 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 

Lucknow. . .A 205 C 242 D 266 P 124 S 130 
Lynden A 205 C 242 D 266 P 126 S 130 



M 



Macaulay, Robert W., M.L.A v 

Maclaren-Quebec Power Companv 102 

Madoc A 205 C 242 D 266 P 126 S 130 

Magnetawan 4 205 C 242 D 266 

P 126 S 130 



Index 



285 



Maintenance of the systems 16 

Management staff, training 95 

Manby, A. VV., Service Centre 62, 84 

Manbv, A. W., T.S 17, 67, 69, 70 

Manitoba 16, 58, 90 

Manitoba Hvdro-Electric Board. . 16, 60, 103 

Manitou Falls G.S 103, 144 

Manpower data processing 20 

Manpower planning and development 95 

Manufacturers of electrical equipment. . . .36 
Manufacturing industry, power and 

energy supplied 44 

Marathon Corporation of Canada 

Limited 16, 173 

Markdale 53, A 205 C 242 D 266 

P 126 S 13Q 

Marketing 36 

Markham dl , A 205 C 242 D 266 

P 126 S 130 

Markham R.O.A 52 

Marmora. . .A 206 C 242 D 266 P 126 S 139 

Martindale, R. H.. T.S 71, 81, 82 

Martin town A 206 C 242 D 266 P 126 S 130 
Massey. . . . .A 220 C 242 D 266 P 150 S 154 

Mastic coating in undercoating 92 

Matabitchuan G.S 103 

Matachcwan Twp C 242 D 266 

Matheson C 242 D 266 

Mattagami River. . . . iv, 6, 58, 61, 71, 73, 74 

Mattawa C 242 D 266 

Mattawa Ri\er 2 

Matured sinking fund, see Sinking fund 
Maxville . ..A 206 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 139 
McGarrv . . .A 220 C 244 D 268 P 150 S 154 

McVittie G.S 103 

Meaford 4 206 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 130 

Mechanical maintenance 16 

Medallion homes 36, 37 

Medallion standards 54 

Medical services 99 

Memorandum of Understanding — 

St. Lawrence Development 13 

Mental health 99 

Merlin A 206 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 130 

Merrickville A 206 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 139 

Merrickville G.S 102 

Merritton 41, 51 

Metropolitan Toronto, see Toronto 

Meversburg G.S 102 

Michigan 58, 60 

Midland \ 207 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 139 

Mildma\- ... .1 207 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 139 
Millbrook A 207 C 244 D 26"^ P 126 S 130 
Milling industry, power and 

energv supplied 44 

Milton . . .'. .A 207 C 244 D 26H P 126 S 130 
Milverton ..A 207 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 130 

Mimico A 207 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 130 

Mining industry, power and 

energy supplied iv, 44 

Minnesota 60 

Minnesota — Ontario Paper Company. ... 1 73 

Mission Rixer 71 

Mississagi River iv, 5, 9, 58, 61. 71, 72 

Mitchell 5\, A 207 C244 D 268 

P 126 S 139 
Mitchell R.O.A 48. 49. 51 



Mobile cranes 17 

Mobile substations 16 

Model of transmission line section 87 

Montreal River 60 

Moorefield 51 , A 207 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 130 

Moose Lake T.S 82 

Moose River 75 

Morrisburg .A 207 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 130 

Mount Brx'dges 1 208 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 

xMount Forest A 208 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 

Municipal distribution systems 256-77 

Municipal electrical service 175 

Municipal electrical utilities iv, 1, 2, 4 

6, 19, 20, 21, 23, 35, 37, 38, 40, 41 

accounts 182-231 

added in 1961 41 

assets 182-231 

assets, fixed 182-231 

commercial service 177, 235-77 

cost, average, per kwh . . . . 176, 177, 256-77 

cost-contract 30, 31 

cost of power 30, 31, 118-37, 150-3 

customers served. . .6, 176, 182-231, 256-77 

debt. .. 182-231 

depreciation 182-231 

energv — consumption 176, 177, 256-77 

supplied 105, 106, 118-37, 150-3 

equity in Ontario Hydro systems. . 182-231 

financial operations 1 79 

financial statements 182-231 

fixed-rate 41 

industrial power service 177, 235-77 

line 18 

loads 258-77 

power supplied 118-37, 150-3, 258-77 

rates — interim 110-135, 151 

retail. _ 234-55 

residential service 234-76 

revenue 182-231 

Muskeg 90, 91 



X 



Napa nee i 208 C 244 D 

.\ational Energy Board . . . . 
National Energy Board Act 
National Research Council. 
Neustadt .. A 208 C 244 D 
Newboro ... .1 208 C 244 D 
Newburgh 54, ^ 

Newburv.. .1 200 C 244 D 
Newcastle ...1 200 C 244 D 
New I lamburg A 



.New Liskearcl 

Newmarket.. 4 200 C 244 D 

Newpost Creek 

New Toronto 1 



.New York 

Niagara. .. ■ A 200 C 244 D 

Niagara Division 

Niagara F'alls 59, 

C244 D 



268 P 126 S 140 

11 

11 

89. 173 

268 P 126 S 140 
268 P 126 S 140 
208 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 
268 P 126 S 140 
268 P 126 S 140 
200 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 
. . . .C 244 D 268 
268 P 126 S 140 

75 

200 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 

58, 69 

268 P 126 S 140 

iii, \,110 

60, 63, 69, .1 209 
268 P 126 S 140 



Code letters A, C, D, with page references, represent each of the statements so designated. P represents Cost 
of Primary Power, and S Sinkine Fund Equity. 



286 



Index 



Niagara Mohawk Power 

Corporation 13, 59, 60, 102 

Niagara Parks T.S 60 

Niagara Region . v, 46, 49, 51, 66, 97, 167, 169 

Niagara River iv, 9, 11, 102, 110 

A'iagara S>stem 6 

Nichols Chemical Conipanx', Limited. ... 173 

Nipigon Twp A 220 C 244 D 268 

P 150 S 154 

Xipissing G.S 103 

Non-metals mining industr}-, power 

and energy supplied 44 

Noranda Mines, Limited 173 

North America 83 

North Bay .A 230 C 244 D 268 P 150 S 154 

Northeastern Division 2, 11, 15, 18, 54, 59 

60, 61, 144 

Northeastern Region 6, 169 

Northern Ontario Properties. . . iii, iv, 1, 2, 6 
14, 19, 24, 25, 41 

advances from the Province 29, 35 

assets 28, 144-7 

assets, fi(xed 28, 144-7 

assistance. Provincial 29 

balance sheet 28-29 

capacitv, dependable peak 10, 14, 15 

103, 104 

capital 29 

cost of providing service 25, 31, 150-3 

defined 2 

depreciation 25, ^'?, 31, 148 

energy — produced for commercial 

load 10, \S, 103, 104 

purchased 15, 103, 104 

secondary 16, 25, J/ 

supplied in wholesale 

quantities 16, 105, 150-3 

transferred 24, 25, 104, 134, 152 

frequency standardization 25, 31, 148 

funded debt 33-5 

liabilities 29 

load 10, 14, 15, 16 

operation 14-16 

operations, financial 25 

statement of 31 

power — produced for commercial 

load 70, 14, 15, 16, 103, 104 

purchased 14, 15, 103, 104 

supplied in wholesale quantities 105 

transferred \S,30, 31, 104, 134, 152 

progress on power developments 71 

refunds to cost-contract 

municipal utilities ?/, 151, 153 

requirements — primary energy 10 

primary peak 10, U, \S, 105 

reserves — statements of 148, 149 

withdrawals from 24, J/ 

resources W, 14, 15, 103, 105 

revenue 25, J7 

rural, see Rural electrical service 

sinking fund equity 154 

transformer stations 81-3 

transmission lines 81-3 

Northwestern Division ... .2, 10, 11, 15, 16, 44 

55, 60, 82, 144 

Northwestern Region 18, 82, 169 

North York Twp 68, A 200 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 

Norton Company 173 

Norwich. . . .A 209 C 244 D 26H P 126 S 140 
Norwood . . . A 210 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 140 



Nuclear Power Demonstration. . 



Nuclear research provision. 



6,55,5^ 

61, 64, 99 

23, 117, 119-37 

149, 150-3 



Oakville-Trafalgar A 210 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 

Ogoki Diversion 110 

Oil Springs .A 210 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 140 
Omemee. .. A 210 C 244 D 268 P 126 S 140 

Ontario, Province of 1, 5, 8, 21, 45, 46 

account 28 

Ontario Educational Association 

Convention 55 

Ontario Hydro Employees Union 97 

Ontario Hydro W.P. Dobson Research 

Laboratory, see Research laboratory 
Ontario-Minnesota Pulp & Paper 

Company 60, 103, 1 73 

O.M.E.A iii 

Ontario Northland Railway 79 

Ontario Power G.S 102, 110 

Ontario School Trustees' and 

Ratepayers' Association 55 

Operating results by systems 24 

Operations Advisory Committee — 

St. Lawrence Ri\er 13 

Operation Eskimo 36 

Operations — aids to 93 

statements of, Commission 30, 31 

municipal 182-231 

Operations research 20, 93 

Orange^•ille 68, 70, A 210 C 244 D 268 

P 126 S 140 

Order in Council 173 

Orenda Engines Limited 173 

Orillia 52, A 210 C 244 D 268 

P 128 S 140 

Orono A 211 C 244 D 268 P 128 S 140 

Oshawa A 211 C 244 D 268 P 128 S 140 

Ottawa .68, A 211 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Ottawa — National Research T.S 68 

— Overbrook T.S 68 

—Slater T.S 68 

Ottawa River 6, 1 1, 61, 64, 89 

Ottawa Valley Power Company 102 

Otter Rapids G.S iv, 5, 9, 15, 58, 61, 71 

75-81, 83, 88, 91, 99, 144 
Otterville. . A 211 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 
Otto Holden G.S., see Holden, Otto, G.S. 
Output, total generated and purchased. ... 11 

net — of all resources 10, 104 

— of Commission stations. . . . 102-3, 104 
— of sources of purchased power. . . . 102 

103, 104 

Owen Sound 68, A 211 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 



Paisley .53, A 211 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Pakistan 56 

Palmerston 68, A 211 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 
Paper industry, 

power and energv supplied 44 

Paris . . .51, .4 21l' C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Parkhill A 211 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Parrv Sound i 212 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 



Index 



287 



Peak capacity, see Capacity, 

dependable peak 
Peak load, see Load 
Peak requirements, see Requirements 
Peaking arrangements — 

St. [>avvrence River 13 

Pelham Twp 51 

Penetanguishene A 212 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 

Permits, inspection 56 

Perth A 212 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Personnel planning 95 

Peterborough S^, A 212 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 

Petrolia A 212 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Pickering. . .A 212 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 
Pickle Lake Landing Tovvnsite. . C 246 D 270 
Picton . . 54, A 213 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Pinard T.S 81, 82 

Pine Portage G.S 103, 144 

Pipeline installations 17 

Plantagenet R.O. A 48 

Plantpower 39 

Plastics 89,92 

Plattsville . ..1 213 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Point Edward A 213 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 

Pollution, air 94 

Porcupine T.S 82 

Port Arthur 5S, A 230 C 246 D 270 

P 150 S 154 

Port Arthur T.S 82 

Port Arthur— Birch T.S 82 

Port Burwell A 213 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 

Port Carling C 246 D 270 

Port Colborne A 213 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 
Port Credit.. 4 213 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Port Dalhousie 41, 51 

Port Dover ..4 213 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 140 

Port Elgin 6, 61, 65, A 213 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 140 

Port Hope 54, A 213 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 141 

Port McXicoll 53, A 214 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 141 
Port Perry. .A 214 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 
Port Rowan A 214 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 

Port Stanlev A 214 C 246 D 270 

P 128 S 141 

Powassan C 246 D 270 

Power — 

produced for commercial load 3, 10, 102, 103 
see also X.O.P. & S.O.S. 

purchased 3, W, 12, 14, 15, 102-5 

requirements, see Requirements 

resources .3, 10, 12, 14, 15 

supply 1 

to direct industrial customers 44, 134, 152 

to municipal systems 118-37, 150-3 

258-77 

to R.P.D 134, 152 

Power Authorit\' of the State of 

New York.' iv, 9, 13, 60, 63, 69, 102 

Power Commission Act, The 

Amendment 1, 4, 45, 56, 172 

Power de\'elopment program 58, 59 

Power-factor survevs 39 



Power-line carrier amplifiers 93 

Prepaid sinking fund, see Sinking fund 
Prescott 54, A 214 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 

Preston A 214 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 

Priceville . . A 215 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 
Princeton. . .T 215 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 

Progress on power developments 63, 71 

Province of Ontario, see Ontario, Province of 
Provincial — advances, see Advances from 

Province of Ontario 
grants, see Assistance, Provincial, for 

rural facilities 

Provincial Legislature i\ , 1 

Public relations 55 

Public speaking contest 55 

Public Utilities Act, The 4 

Pulp and paper industry iv, 44 

Purchased energy and power, sec Energy, 

and Power 



Q 

Quality, Triple Seal of 37 

Quarrying industry, power and 

energv supplied 44 

Quebec...' 58, 59, 60, 75 

Quebec Hydro-P^lectric 

Commission 54, 59, 89, 102, 103 

Quebec suppliers 14, 59 

Queen Elizabeth \Va\ 69 

Queenston . .A 215 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 
Queenston-Chippawa Development, see 

Beck, Sir Adam, -Niagara G.S. No. 1 



R 



R. H. Martindale T.S., see 
Martindale, R. H., T.S. 

Ragged Rapids G.S 102 

Rainv Lake 90 

Rainv River 55, A 230 C 246 D 270 

Ranney F'alls G.S. 102 

Rate — house-heating 38 

of growth, long-term, all systems ^■, 9 

stabilization 25 

Rates 4, 19, 21, 56 

interim 119-35, 150 

municipal retail 234-255 

rural 163-4 

Rates Committee of the A.M.E.U 57 

Rat Rapids G.S 103 

Rayner, George W'.. G.S 72, 103, 144 

Rebates to cost-contract municipal 

utilities 21, 30, 31, 110-37, 150-3 

Red Lake Townsite C 246 D 270 

Red Rock . .A 230 C 246 D 270 P 150 S 154 

Red Rock Falls G.S iv, 5, 9, 15, 58, 61 

72, 80. 103, 144 

Reforestation 18 

Regions, reports from 51 

Regulation Plan 1958C— 

St. Lawrence Ri\er 13 

Regulations made under The Power 

Commission Act 56 

Relocation of high-voltage 

transmission lines 17 

Renfrew A 215 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 



Code letters A, C, D, with page references, represent each of 
of Primary Power, and S Sinking Fund Equity. 



the statements so designated. P represents Cost 



288 



Index 



Requirements — primary energy 10 

primary power 6, 10, 15, 16 

thermal-electric energy 11 

see also N.O.P. & S.O'.S. 
Research Laboratory, 

Ontario Hydro \V.P. Dohson. . . y, 62, 84 

Reser^■e generating capacitx- iv 

Reser\es 

pro\ision ?0, 31 

statements of. N.O.P MS, 149 

S.O.S 116, 117_ 

Reseryes of power W, 105 

Residential serxice 106 

defined 162, 232 

municipal sxstems 177, 234-76 

rural ' 46, 164, 166-70 

Resin, epo.w 92 

Resources. .' v, 3, 6, 10, 103, 104 

see also Capacitx', dependable peak 
" " N.O.P. & S.O.S. 

Retail distribution of electricit\- 40 

Retail rates 5 

Reyenue of the Commission 6, 21 

see also N.O.P. & S.O.S., and Rural 
electrical seryice 

of municipal electrical utilities lHZ-231 

Rewiring, time-payment plan 37 

Richard L. Hearn G.S., see Hearn, 

Richard L., G.S. 
Richmond . .A 215 C 246 D 270 P 128 S 141 

Richmond Hill bl, A 215 C 248 D 272 

P 128 S 141 

Richmond Hill R.O.A 52 

Richview T.S 67, 68, 93 

Ridgetown. .4 215 C 248 D 272 P 128 S 141 

Rio Algom Mines Limited 173 

Ripley A 215 C 248 D 272 P 128 S 141 

Riverside ... .4 215 C 248 D 272 P 128 S 141 
Robert H. Saunders-St. Lawrence G.S., 
see Saunders, Robert H., 
-St. Lawrence G.S. 
Rockland. . A 216 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 
Rockwood . .A 216 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Rodney A 216 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Rolphton.. .6, 61, 64 

Ross L. Dobbin T.S., see Dobbin, 

Ross L., T.S. 
Rosseau ... ..4 216 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Rubber paint 92 

Rural electrical serxice 7, 2 1 , 40, 45-50, 162-170 
assets, fixed. . . . . . .22, 26, 28, 46, 112, 146 

assistance, Provincial 46, 27, 20 

classes of service 46, 162-170 

consumption, average, per customer. 50, 170 

cost, average, per kwh 50, 170 

cost of proxiding service W, 31, 48 

customers, number of. . .46, 47, 48, 166-70 

energy — consumption 106, 170 

supplied 49-50. 105, 107 

expenditure on facilities. . .22, 5(>, 113, 147 

line, miles of primarx' 46, 47, 166-9 

load groxvth 49 

operating areas 48, 107, 165-9 

map facing page 166 

power supplied 49, 134, 152 

Tates 45, 48, 50, 162-5 

rex-enue 30, 31, 50 

Rural Hvdro-Electric Distribution 

Act,' The 5,45 

Rural Power District 1, 20, 21, 48 

see also Rural electrical service 
Russell 1 216 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 



St. Catharines. . . A\, 5\, A 216 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 
St. Clair Beach A 217 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 
St. George. A 217 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 
St. Jacobs ..A 217 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 
St. Lawrence International 

Board of Control 13 

St. Lawrence Power Project 110 

St. Lawrence River 11. 13, 102, 110 

St. Laxvrence T.S 60, 69, 93 

St. Mary's 5\, A 217 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 
St. Thomas ./I 217 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

St. Thomas T.S 66 

Sales and retirements 22 

Sales of energy, see Energy — supplied 

Sales program ix', 36-9 

Sandwich East Twp A 217 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 
Sandwich West Twp A 217 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 

Sandy Falls G.S 103 

Sarnia . . 60, A 217 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 
Saunders, Robert H., -St. Lawrence 

G.S 14, 63, 80, 89, 102 

Scarborough Twp A 217 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 

Scarborough T.S 67 

Scheduling of poxver resources 20 

Scholarships awarded by the Commission .56 

School-house at Cameron Falls 63 

Schreiber Twp A 230 C 248 D 272 

P 150 S 154 
Schumacher, see Timmins 
Seaforth 51, A 218 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Seat belts 93 

Secondarx- energy 10, 21. 30, 31, 39 

40, 45, 105, 134, 152 

Serxice buildings 62, 63 

Service buildings and equipment, see 
N.O.P. & S.O.S.— assets, fixed 

Services to customers 55, 56 

Sex^erity index of accidents 97 

Seymour G.S 102 

•Shelburne . A 218 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Sidney G.S 102 

Sills Island G.S 102 

Silver Falls G.S 16, 17, 103, 144 

Silxer mining industry, poxver and 

energy supplied 44 

Simcoe ..'. ..A 218 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Simpson, Benjamin 98 

Sinking fund — of the Commission . 19, 21, 24 
see also N.O.P. & S.O.S. 
equity of municipal electrical 

utilities 182-231 

Sioux Lookout A 230 C 248 D 272 

Sir Adam Beck-Niagara G.S., see 

Beck, Sir Adam, -Niagara G.S. 
Sleet conditions, technique for meeting. 70, 71 
Smith's Falls SA, A 218 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 

Smith's Falls T.S 69 

Smithville ..A 218 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Smoky F'alls 74 

Source of funds ^^ 

Southampton A 218 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 



Index 



289 



Southern Ontario S\steni iii, iv, 1, 2, 6 

11, 12, 13, 15, 19,23, 24, 41, 42, 43 
44, 59, 60, 61, 66, 93 

advances from the Province 27 , 34 

assets 26 

assets, fixed 26, 1 10-3 

assistance. Provincial 27 

balance sheet 26-7 

capacity, dependable peak./6>, 12, 102, 104 

capital 27 

cost of pro\iding service. 23, 25, 30, 118-35 

defined 1 

depreciation 2\, 26, 30, 1/4 

energ> — produced for coniniercial 

load 10, 102, 104 

purchased 102, 101 

secondary 12, 24, 26 

supplied in wholesale quantities 105 

transferred 104, 134, 152 

frequencv standardization 30, 59, 115 

funded debt 27, 32-5 

liabilities 27 

load 10, 12, 104 

operation 12-14 

operations, financial 24-5 

statement of 30 

power — export 11 

produced for commercial load 10, 12 

purchased .12, 102, 104 

supplied in wholesale quantities 105 

transferred 24, 25, 30, 31, 134, 152 

progress on p(jwer developments 63 

refund to municipal electrical 

utilities 30, 119-37 

requirements — primary energy 10 

primary peak 10, 12, 105 

reserv^es — provision 23, 30 

statements of 116, 117 

resources 76>, 12, 13, 102, 104 

revenue 24, 30 

rural, see Rural Electrical Service 

sinking fund equity 27, 138-45 

transformer stations 66-9 

transmission lines 69-71 

South Falls G.S 102 

South Porcupine Townsite C 24S D 272 

South River. . 15, 41, 54, A 231 C 248 D 272 

P 150 S 154 

South Ri\er Power Company 15 

Space-heating, electric 37, 38, 51, 52 

54, 57, 62 

Spacer-damper 85 

Spraying for brush control 18 

Springfield. ./I 219 C 24H D 272 P 130 S 141 

Stabilization of Rates Reserve 21, 23, 24 

27, 29, 116-7, 14H-9 
Staff, see Kmolovment statistics 

Stamford Twp. . ' A 219 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 

Standard accounting procedures 42 

Statutes of Ontario, 1950, Re\ised 1 

Stayner. . . .A 219 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 
Steel industry, power and energy supplied.-/-/ 

Stereoplotter 63 

Stewartville G.S 102, 1 10 

Stinson G.S 103 

Stirling 4 219 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Stoney Creek i 219 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 



Storage conditions 11 

Stouffvillc 67, .1 219 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 

Strain, blading, in steam-turbines 91 

Stratford 5] , A 219 C 248 D 272 

P 130 S 141 

Stratford R.O.A 49, 51 

Strathroy . . ..4 219 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Stream-flows j 1 

Street lighting 20, 51, 54, 106, 177, 178 

Streetsville .A 219 C 248 D 272 P 130 S 141 

Stress, thermal 91 

Strike, VV. Ross, Q.C 55 

Stringing ground cable by helicopter 18 

Sturgeon Falls 4 231 C 248 D 272 

P 150 S 154 

Sudbury 9, 61, 63, 82, 85 

A 231 C 248 D 272 P 150 S 154 

Sudbury District 75 

Sulphur dioxide 94 

Summer service 46, 106, 164, 165-70 

Sunderland .A 220 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142 
Sundridge. . .A 220 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142 

Sunshine Special 36 

Supervisory training 95 

Surplus, hydro-electric energy. . 16, 30, 31, 59 

Surplus, N.O.P. statement of 21, 22, .?/ 

Survey work 18, 63 

Sutton A 220 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142 

Swansea. . . .A 220 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142 

Swastika, see Kirkland Lake 

Svstems 1 



Tara A 220 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142 

Tavistock 51, A 220 C 250 D 274 

P 130 S 142 
Tecumseh . .A 221 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142 
Teeswater . ..1 221 C 250 D 274 P 130 S 142^ 

Telemetering 93 

Temiskaming District 75 

Terrace Bav Twp. . . .55, A 231 C 250 D 274 

P 150 S 154 
Thamesford 1 221 C 250 D 274 

P 130 S 142 
Thamesville A 221 C 250 D 274 

P 130 S 142 
Thedford ...A 221 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 
Thermal-electric energy generated. .. 10, 104 
Thermal-electric generating 

facilities 59, 102, 110, 144 

Thessalon 12, A 231 C 250 D 274 

P 150 S 154 
Thistletown, see Ftobicoke Twp. 
Thornbury .A 221 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 
Thorndale . .A 221 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

Thornloe C 250 D 274 

Thornton. . A 221 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 
Thorold . .. .A 222 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

Thorold Twp 51 

Thunder Bay G.S v, 6, 58, 61, 71, 82, 98 

Thunder Bay System iii, 6, 20, 153 

Tilbury A 222 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

Tillsonburg \ 222 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 

Timmins 82, 90, 91, C 250 D 274 

Timmins T.S 81 



Code letters A, C, D, with page references, represent each of the statements so designated, 
of Primary Power, and S Sinking Fund Equity. 



P represents Cost 



290 



Index 



Toronto. . iv, 9, 52, 60, 62, 64, 67, 68, 71, 82, 94 
A 222 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

Toroiito-Bathiirst T.S 67 

-Glongro\e T.S 17 

-Loaside T.S 17, 113, 116 

-Leslie T.S.... 68 

-I^iinininede T.S 67 

-Sheppard T.S 67 

-Teraulav T.S 67 

'i\)ronto Power G.S 102, 110 

Toronto Region, see Central Region 

Toronto Tup 67, .1 222 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 

Torsion-t\pe dampers 85 

Tottenham .A 222 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

Tower maintenance 18 

'IVafalgar Twp., see Oak\ille- Trafalgar 

'Training, technical 96 

Transfer of power 

and energy 30, 31, 104, 134, 152 

Transformer stations 22, 59 

see also indi\idual listings 
'• " \. O. P. & S.O.S.— assets, fixed 

Transformers, on-site repairs 16 

Transmission line 22, 50 

c.xtra-high-voltage 2, 63, 71, 82, 83, 91 

total mileage 6, 61 

see also N.O.P. & S.O.S.— assets, fixed 

Transmission towers, guyed, v-type 83 

Transport equipment 98 

Transportation services, power 

and energy supplied 44 

'Tree pruning and remo\al 18 

Trenton 4 223 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

'Trethewey Falls G.S 102 

'Tweed A 223 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

'Twin Falls 75 

U 

Ultimate customers served by the 

Commission and municipal 

electrical utilities 40 

Undercoating 92 

Underground cable, see Cable 

Underground facilities 51, 52 

Underwater coatings 92 

Uniform rural rates 45, 58 

Unit tripping of power resources 13 

United Nations 56 

United States 9, 60 

I 'nivac 1 1 computer 93 

Upper Notch G.S 103 

Uranium mining industry, power 

and energy supplied 44 

Urethane thermal insulation 91 

( xbridge . ..A 223 C 250 D 274 P 132 S 142 

V 

\aiikleek Hill A 223 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 

\ar\ed clay 90 

X'ibration studies 91 

\ictoria Harbour I 223 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 

\'in\l protecti\e coating 93 

V'oltage gradient 87 



W 

VValkerton . . A 223 C 250 
VVallaceburg 

Wardsville...4 223 C 250 
Warlvworth 

W'asaga Beach 52, 

Waterdown.^ 224 C 250 
Waterford. .A 224 C 250 
Water-heating, electric. . 

sales 

Waterloo 51, 

Watford.. ..A 224 C 250 
VV^aubaushene 



Wawaitin G.S 

Webbwood .A 231 C 250 
Welland 51, 

Wellesley. ..A 225 C 252 
Wellington 54, 

West Central Region. 2, 46 
Western Region. . .18, 46, 
West Ferris Twp 

West Lome . A 225 C 252 

Weston A 225 C 252 

Westport. ..A 225 C 252 
Wheatley....4 225 C 252 
Whitby. 52, A 226 C 252 

Whitedog Falls G.S 

White River 

Wiarton . . . .A 226 C 252 
Williamsburg 

Willowdale 

Winchester ./I 226 C 252 
Windermere 



Windsor 51, 60, 66, 

Windsor-Crawford T.S. . 
Wingham 53, 



Wiring, substandard 
Woodbridge 



Woodstock 51, 

Woodville ..^ 227 C 252 
Workmen's compensation 

World War H 

Wyoming... yl 227 C 252 



D 274 P 132 S 142 
A 223 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 
D 274 P 132 S 142 
A 224 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 
A 224 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 
D 274 P 132 S 142 
D 274 P 132 S 142 
. . : ..^9, 57, 232-277 

37, 39 

A 224 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 
D 274 P 132 S 142 
A 225 C 250 D 274 

P 132 S 142 

103 

D 274 P 150 S 154 
A 225 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 142 
D 276 P 132 S 142 
A 225 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 142 
,48, 51,66, 7(J^, 169 
48,51,66, 166, 169 
A 231 C 252 D 276 

P 150 S 154 
D 276 P 132 S 142 
D 276 P 132 S 142 
D 276 P 132 S 142 
D 276 P 132 S 142 
D 276 P 132 S 142 

103, 144 

. . . 60, C 252 D 276 
D 276 P 132 S 142 
A 226 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 142 

62 

D 276 P 132 S 143 
A 226 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 143 
A 226 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 143 

66 

A 227 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 143 

56 

A 227 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 143 
A 227 C 252 D 276 

P 132 S 143 
D 276 P 132 S 143 

98 

46 

D 276 P 132 S 143 



York Twp. . A 227 C 252 D 276 P 132 S 143 



Zurich A 227 C 252 D 276 P 132 S 143 



m,j,l^iZ SE-^T. APRlll^n 



Gov. Doc, Ontario. li/dro-Electric 
Ont Pov;er Commission. 

H Aniiu&l report 

V. 53-54(1960-61) 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
LIBRARY 






m 



mm 



l3SS'^« 












■,i\!'i*!,iW 



lilii 

'-'mm 



>f.m